Race Street (1948)

76-77 or 79 mins | Drama | 22 June 1948

Director:

Edwin L. Marin

Writer:

Martin Rackin

Producer:

Nat Holt

Cinematographer:

J. Roy Hunt

Production Designers:

Albert D'Agostino, Walter E. Keller

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

After production on this picture was completed, HR announced that the title was being changed from Race Street to Jackpot . By the time of the picture's release, however, the title had been changed back to Race Street . According to HR , William Henry tested for the "heavy" role. Some scenes in the picture were shot in San Francisco, according to HR ... More Less

After production on this picture was completed, HR announced that the title was being changed from Race Street to Jackpot . By the time of the picture's release, however, the title had been changed back to Race Street . According to HR , William Henry tested for the "heavy" role. Some scenes in the picture were shot in San Francisco, according to HR . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
3 Jul 1948.
---
Daily Variety
23 Jun 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Jun 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 47
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 47
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 47
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 47
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 48
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Jun 48
p. 4207.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Jun 48
p. 4214.
New York Times
23 Aug 48
p. 13.
Variety
23 Jun 48
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Dore Schary in Charge of Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the serial story "Race Street" by Maurice Davis in Turf and Sport Digest (Dec 1945, Jan--Mar 1946).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Love That Boy," music and lyrics by Don Raye and Gene DePaul
"I'm in a Jam with Baby," music by Ray Heindorf and Moe Jerome, lyrics by Ted Koehler.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Jackpot
Release Date:
22 June 1948
Production Date:
18 August--late September 1947
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
29 July 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1763
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76-77 or 79
Length(in feet):
7,081
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12683
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When San Francisco bookmaker Hal Towers confides in his boss, racketeer Dan Gannin, that a syndicate is trying to force him to pay protection money, Dan reminds him about their recent pledge to get out of the gambling racket. Although Dan offers his best friend a chance to invest in his new, legitimate nightclub, Hal insists on fighting the syndicate. Dan cautions Hal, who is lame, to be careful, but before the night is over, Dan and another childhood friend, police detective Barney Runson, find the bookie lying dead at the bottom of his apartment stairs. Concerned for his friend's safety, Barney warns Dan not to seek vengeance on Hal's killers, but allow the law to pursue justice. Dan's associates, however, expect him to retaliate for Hal's murder, and Dan obeys the rules of gangster protocol by not revealing anything about the case to Barney. When Dan goes home that night, he is greeted by two well-dressed men who present themselves as "insurance salesmen." Anxious to discover who is behind the syndicate, Dan agrees to consider their protection offer, but the next day, the men see Barney at Dan's office and, assuming he is talking to the police, leave in a huff. Once again, Dan refuses Barney's request for information, and later criticizes his girl friend, Robbie Lawrence, for nagging him about being careful. After dropping Robbie home that night, Dan is accosted by two thugs, who blindfold him and take him to see their boss. Without revealing his identity, the boss gives Dan another chance to join the syndicate, but Dan refuses. Unaware that Robbie is sitting in the room with the ... +


When San Francisco bookmaker Hal Towers confides in his boss, racketeer Dan Gannin, that a syndicate is trying to force him to pay protection money, Dan reminds him about their recent pledge to get out of the gambling racket. Although Dan offers his best friend a chance to invest in his new, legitimate nightclub, Hal insists on fighting the syndicate. Dan cautions Hal, who is lame, to be careful, but before the night is over, Dan and another childhood friend, police detective Barney Runson, find the bookie lying dead at the bottom of his apartment stairs. Concerned for his friend's safety, Barney warns Dan not to seek vengeance on Hal's killers, but allow the law to pursue justice. Dan's associates, however, expect him to retaliate for Hal's murder, and Dan obeys the rules of gangster protocol by not revealing anything about the case to Barney. When Dan goes home that night, he is greeted by two well-dressed men who present themselves as "insurance salesmen." Anxious to discover who is behind the syndicate, Dan agrees to consider their protection offer, but the next day, the men see Barney at Dan's office and, assuming he is talking to the police, leave in a huff. Once again, Dan refuses Barney's request for information, and later criticizes his girl friend, Robbie Lawrence, for nagging him about being careful. After dropping Robbie home that night, Dan is accosted by two thugs, who blindfold him and take him to see their boss. Without revealing his identity, the boss gives Dan another chance to join the syndicate, but Dan refuses. Unaware that Robbie is sitting in the room with the boss, Dan is then beaten up by the thugs. After Barney has Dan released from the hospital, he questions Robbie at her apartment and comments that her face looks familiar to him. Dan then advises his bookmakers not to fight the syndicate, but allow him to take care of the problem. The next day, Dan's sister Elaine, a singer at his nightclub, begs Dan to stop his crusade, but he insists on finding Hal's killer. Unable to convince Dan to cooperate with him, Barney takes him to an old vaudeville theater and shows him a photograph of Robbie, a former showgirl, with husband Phil Dixon, the syndicate boss. Although Robbie, who told Dan she was a war widow, insists that she hasn't seen Dixon in years, Dan knows she is lying as he had smelled her perfume in Dixon's office the previous night. When confronted with the truth, Robbie confesses her deception but insists that Dixon forced her to betray him. Then, pledging her love to Dan, she agrees to leave San Francisco with him that night. As Dan is leaving Robbie's apartment, however, he overhears the desk clerk relaying a telephone call from her to Dixon and eavesdrops on the conversation. Now sure of Robbie's double-cross, Dan returns home, where he is put under protective custody by Barney. As Barney and Dan are leaving, Al, one of Dan's bookies, stops them at gunpoint and declares his allegiance to the syndicate. Dixon then arrives and is about to take Dan and Barney away when Dan instigates a fight. During the mêlée, Dan intercepts a bullet meant for Barney, who then knocks out Dixon. After Barney acknowledges his friend's sacrifice, Dan dies in his arms. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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