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HISTORY

Although all HR production charts list Norbert Brodine as the film's directory of photography, only Joseph LaShelle is credited onscreen. According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department and the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, this production was initiated by actress Ida Lupino. In Sep 1947, the studio purchased the rights to an original story and screenplay entitled Dark Love from Lupino, who had commissioned them from writers Margaret Gruen and Oscar Saul. Included in the $130,000 purchase price were the acting services of Lupino, which cost $100,000. When, in an early draft of the script "Jefty" was depicted as an older man, studio chief Darryl F. Zanuck proposed Charles Bickford for the role, and Widmark for "Pete." Victor Mature and Lee J. Cobb were also considered for the roles of Pete and Jefty, respectively.
       Road House was director Jean Negulesco's first film for Twentieth Century-Fox after a long career at Warner Bros. Negulesco went on to have a long, successful career at Twentieth Century-Fox making such films as Three Came Home (1950), Titanic (1953) Three Coins in the Fountain (1954) and The Best of Everything (1959). According to studio records, the scenes in the roadhouse's bowling alley were shot at a real alley located near the studio. A contemporary source claims that Louis Bacigalupi played the role of the drunk who interrupts "Lily's" act, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A radio adaptation of the story was broadcast on the Screen Guild Players program on 2 ... More Less

Although all HR production charts list Norbert Brodine as the film's directory of photography, only Joseph LaShelle is credited onscreen. According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department and the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, this production was initiated by actress Ida Lupino. In Sep 1947, the studio purchased the rights to an original story and screenplay entitled Dark Love from Lupino, who had commissioned them from writers Margaret Gruen and Oscar Saul. Included in the $130,000 purchase price were the acting services of Lupino, which cost $100,000. When, in an early draft of the script "Jefty" was depicted as an older man, studio chief Darryl F. Zanuck proposed Charles Bickford for the role, and Widmark for "Pete." Victor Mature and Lee J. Cobb were also considered for the roles of Pete and Jefty, respectively.
       Road House was director Jean Negulesco's first film for Twentieth Century-Fox after a long career at Warner Bros. Negulesco went on to have a long, successful career at Twentieth Century-Fox making such films as Three Came Home (1950), Titanic (1953) Three Coins in the Fountain (1954) and The Best of Everything (1959). According to studio records, the scenes in the roadhouse's bowling alley were shot at a real alley located near the studio. A contemporary source claims that Louis Bacigalupi played the role of the drunk who interrupts "Lily's" act, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A radio adaptation of the story was broadcast on the Screen Guild Players program on 2 Jun 1949 and starred Lupino, Lloyd Nolan and Richard Widmark. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Oct 1948.
---
Daily Variety
22 Sep 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Sep 48
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 48
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 48
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 48
pp. 3-4.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 48
pp. 8-9.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Sep 48
p. 4311.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Oct 48
p. 4333.
New York Times
8 Nov 48
p. 24.
Variety
22 Sep 48
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Tech adv
Tech adv
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Fighting instructor
SOURCES
SONGS
"One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)," music by Harold Arlen, lyrics by Johnny Mercer
"Again," music by Lionel Newman, lyrics by Dorcas Cochran
"The Right Kind," music by Lionel Newman, lyrics by Don George and Charles Henderson.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dark Love
Release Date:
November 1948
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 6 November 1948
Production Date:
22 March--11 May 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
31 October 1948
Copyright Number:
LP2199
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
95
Length(in feet):
8,557
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13093
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Pete Morgan manages Jefty's Road House for his longtime friend, Jefty Robbins, who inherited the place from his father. Jefty is attracted to Lily Stevens, his new singer, but Pete thinks she is just another in a long string of girls he will eventually have to send on her way. Jefty, however, is convinced that Lily is different, even though she is playing hard-to-get with him. Although Pete tries to pay Lily off and put her on a train, she is not about to leave and makes a successful debut at the club, accompanying herself on piano. Jefty asks Pete to teach Lily how to bowl in the roadhouse's alley but she shows little interest in the sport and quite a bit more in Pete. Susie Smith, the club's cashier who is fond of Pete, soon becomes jealous of Lily. Before Jefty leaves on a hunting trip with some friends, he tells Lily that she is not like any other girl he has ever met. Lily then tries to join Pete for a boat ride on a lake, but he refuses to take her as she is Jefty's girl. When Lily contradicts that notion, Pete arranges to pick her up later. Susie also goes along, although the women's friendship is decidedly frosty. Later, Pete comes to Lily's rescue when a drunk causes a scene at the club. Afterward, Lily tells Pete about her childhood and they are soon engaged in a passionate kiss. Pete confesses that he loves her, and it is obvious she feels the same way about him. Their idyll is interrupted when Jefty returns from his hunting trip and shows Pete a marriage licence he ... +


Pete Morgan manages Jefty's Road House for his longtime friend, Jefty Robbins, who inherited the place from his father. Jefty is attracted to Lily Stevens, his new singer, but Pete thinks she is just another in a long string of girls he will eventually have to send on her way. Jefty, however, is convinced that Lily is different, even though she is playing hard-to-get with him. Although Pete tries to pay Lily off and put her on a train, she is not about to leave and makes a successful debut at the club, accompanying herself on piano. Jefty asks Pete to teach Lily how to bowl in the roadhouse's alley but she shows little interest in the sport and quite a bit more in Pete. Susie Smith, the club's cashier who is fond of Pete, soon becomes jealous of Lily. Before Jefty leaves on a hunting trip with some friends, he tells Lily that she is not like any other girl he has ever met. Lily then tries to join Pete for a boat ride on a lake, but he refuses to take her as she is Jefty's girl. When Lily contradicts that notion, Pete arranges to pick her up later. Susie also goes along, although the women's friendship is decidedly frosty. Later, Pete comes to Lily's rescue when a drunk causes a scene at the club. Afterward, Lily tells Pete about her childhood and they are soon engaged in a passionate kiss. Pete confesses that he loves her, and it is obvious she feels the same way about him. Their idyll is interrupted when Jefty returns from his hunting trip and shows Pete a marriage licence he has obtained in his and Lily's names. When Jefty phones Lily to tell her they are going to be married, she balks at his presumptuousness. Pete and Lily then discuss how they are going to tell Jefty about their romance, and Pete finally volunteers to speak with Jefty. When Pete tells Jefty that he and Lily are planning to be married, Jefty throws him out. Pete leaves Jefty a note stating that he and Lily are leaving that night and that he has taken $600 owed to him. As the couple waits at the railroad station, two policemen arrive and take them to be interviewed by their captain. Jefty claims that the entire week's receipts have been taken from the roadhouse's safe, but Pete insists he took only $600. After Susie states that the receipts totaled $2,600, Pete is held for trial and Lily accuses Jefty of framing him. Later, Pete is tried and found guilty of grand larceny. Before sentencing, Jefty talks to the judge in private and persuades him to parole Pete into his custody. The judge announces that Pete will be on probation for two years, but will have his job back and will be obligated to repay Jefty from his paycheck. Pete and Lily realize that Jefty has them trapped. Later, Jefty informs them that he, Pete, Lily and Susie are going to spend a few days at his hunting cabin. Pete tells Lily he wants to cross the Canadian border, which is only fifteen miles from the cabin, with her. Lily refuses to go, however, as she feels that violating the terms of his parole will only land Pete in more trouble. Once at his cabin, Jefty taunts Pete and Lily with the possibility of their escaping to Canada, and that night, when they are all outside, Jefty starts fooling around with his rifle. After Lily accuses Jefty of taking the missing money and setting Pete up, Jefty hits her. Pete retaliates by fighting Jefty and knocking him out. Lily then decides that she will go with Pete to Canada, and they set off on foot through the woods. Susie, meanwhile, discovers a deposit envelope for the receipts in Jefty's coat pocket and runs after Pete. When Susie gives the envelope to Pete, she is shot in the arm by a pursuing Jefty. In the fog-enshrouded lakeside, Pete then cranks up the motor on a boat and sends it off empty. After Jefty wastes bullets shooting at the boat, Pete tries to grab his gun, and a fight ensues. Lily gets possession of the gun and shoots Jefty when he threatens to hit her with a rock. As Jefty dies, he reminds Pete that he once told him that Lily was different. Dawn breaks as Pete, Lily and Susie head out of the woods and back to civilization. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.