The Strawberry Roan (1948)

78 mins | Western | August 1948

Director:

John English

Producer:

Armand Schaefer

Cinematographer:

Fred Jackman Jr.

Editor:

Henry Batista

Production Designer:

Harold MacArthur

Production Company:

Gene Autry Productions
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HISTORY

The film's end credits include the following written acknowledgment: "This picture was made under the supervision and with the cooperation of the American Humane Association." This was Gene Autry's first color musical western under his independent production contract with Columbia. Some scenes were filmed in Sedona and Flagstaff, ... More Less

The film's end credits include the following written acknowledgment: "This picture was made under the supervision and with the cooperation of the American Humane Association." This was Gene Autry's first color musical western under his independent production contract with Columbia. Some scenes were filmed in Sedona and Flagstaff, AZ. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Mar 1948.
---
Daily Variety
16 Apr 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Apr 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 47
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 47
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 48
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Feb 48
p. 4067.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Apr 48
p. 4137.
Variety
28 Apr 48
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd eng
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Cinecolor supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Angel Song," words and music by Gene Autry, Curt Massey and Mary Hillard
"Texas Sandman," words and music by Allan Roberts and Doris Fisher
"When the White Roses Bloom (In Red River Valley)," words and music by Paul Herrick and Allie Wrubel
+
SONGS
"The Angel Song," words and music by Gene Autry, Curt Massey and Mary Hillard
"Texas Sandman," words and music by Allan Roberts and Doris Fisher
"When the White Roses Bloom (In Red River Valley)," words and music by Paul Herrick and Allie Wrubel
"The Strawberry Roan," traditional, arranged by Fred Howard, Nat Vincent and Curley Fletcher.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1948
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 15 July 1948
Production Date:
18 June--18 July 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Gene Autry Productions
Copyright Date:
4 March 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1488
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Cinecolor
Duration(in mins):
78
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12614
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When the cowboys of the Bar B ranch capture a magnificent wild roan stallion, Joe Bailey, the owner's son, asks his father Walt to let him keep the horse, which he names Champ. While trying to break the stallion, Joe is thrown and trampled by the terrified horse. When the doctor declares that Joe may be crippled for life, Walt decides to kill his son's attacker, but Gene Autry, the ranch foreman, aided by Joe's sister, Connie, frees the steed. Walt and the ranchhands pursue the stallion, and when they corner him on a high cliff, he leaps rather than be captured again. Climbing down to the foot of the cliff, Gene locates the injured horse and dresses his wounds. Back at the Bar B, Gene learns that Joe has lost his will to recover and tries to instill confidence in the boy. In the valley below the cliff, Gene builds a corral for the injured horse and nurses him back to health, eventually making friends with him. Once Champ is fully recovered, Gene returns him to the wilds to assume his position as leader of the herd. One day, Champ appears at the ranch, lifting Joe's spirits. When Walt tries to capture the horse, Gene mounts him and gallops off and Connie's mare Sweetheart follows them. As soon as Gene returns to the ranch riding Sweetheart, Walt orders him to return the roan. Gene refuses, and Walt fires him and accuses him of rustling. After Gene tells Connie that Joe's dream of riding Champ is the motivation he needs to walk again, Connie gives Gene Sweetheart. Months later, Walt posts a reward for Gene and the roan. During ... +


When the cowboys of the Bar B ranch capture a magnificent wild roan stallion, Joe Bailey, the owner's son, asks his father Walt to let him keep the horse, which he names Champ. While trying to break the stallion, Joe is thrown and trampled by the terrified horse. When the doctor declares that Joe may be crippled for life, Walt decides to kill his son's attacker, but Gene Autry, the ranch foreman, aided by Joe's sister, Connie, frees the steed. Walt and the ranchhands pursue the stallion, and when they corner him on a high cliff, he leaps rather than be captured again. Climbing down to the foot of the cliff, Gene locates the injured horse and dresses his wounds. Back at the Bar B, Gene learns that Joe has lost his will to recover and tries to instill confidence in the boy. In the valley below the cliff, Gene builds a corral for the injured horse and nurses him back to health, eventually making friends with him. Once Champ is fully recovered, Gene returns him to the wilds to assume his position as leader of the herd. One day, Champ appears at the ranch, lifting Joe's spirits. When Walt tries to capture the horse, Gene mounts him and gallops off and Connie's mare Sweetheart follows them. As soon as Gene returns to the ranch riding Sweetheart, Walt orders him to return the roan. Gene refuses, and Walt fires him and accuses him of rustling. After Gene tells Connie that Joe's dream of riding Champ is the motivation he needs to walk again, Connie gives Gene Sweetheart. Months later, Walt posts a reward for Gene and the roan. During that period, Gene breaks Champ to the saddle, and Sweetheart and Champ fall in love. One day, Sweetheart, now in foal, is chased by wolves and jumps into an icy lake and falls ill from exposure. When Gene goes to the ranch for medicine, he is spotted by Walt, who then forms a posse to pursue him. Connie and Joe follow in a wagon, and the posse closes in on Gene just as Connie arrives to help deliver Sweetheart's colt. After Connie beseeches Gene to escape before her father can apprehend him, Gene promises to leave after completing one last task. Gene rides Champ to the wagon in which Joe is waiting for Connie, leaves the horse with the boy and walks away. Overcoming his fear, Joe mounts the stallion and gallops off. Just then, Walt sights the horse, and thinking that the rider is Gene, fires his gun, wounding Joe. Gene follows in the wagon and informs Walt that he has shot his own son. Realizing what a fool he has been, Walt asks Gene to return to the ranch as foreman. Joe, who is only slightly wounded, then gives Champ to Gene, declaring that he will train Champ's colt. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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