The Voice of the Turtle (1948)

103 mins | Comedy-drama | 21 February 1948

Director:

Irving Rapper

Writer:

John Van Druten

Producer:

Charles Hoffman

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Rudi Fehr

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The cast of John van Druten's original play comprised only three characters: "Sally," "Bill" and "Olive." The play was still running on Broadway when the film opened. According to a 19 Apr 1946 HR news item, Jean Arthur was first offered the lead in the picture. Margaret Sullavan, who starred in the Broadway production, was also tested, according to an 8 Aug 1946 HR news item. A 23 Feb 1947 NYT news item reports that van Druten was to have directed the film, but chose not to, and that the play's Broadway producer, Alfred de Liagre, who was to produce the film as well, left the project because of casting disagreements. According to information included in the MPAA/PCA file on the film at the AMPAS Library, PCA director, Joseph I. Breen obected to John van Druten's play as "a story of illicit sex, without sufficient compensating moral values." In a 3 Jun 1946 letter to Warner Bros. executive Jack L. Warner, Breen advised that "in order to bring this story within the provision of the Production Code, it will be necessary affirmatively to establish that there has been no illicit sex affair between Bill and Sally ." The film was shown on television under the title One for the Book ... More Less

The cast of John van Druten's original play comprised only three characters: "Sally," "Bill" and "Olive." The play was still running on Broadway when the film opened. According to a 19 Apr 1946 HR news item, Jean Arthur was first offered the lead in the picture. Margaret Sullavan, who starred in the Broadway production, was also tested, according to an 8 Aug 1946 HR news item. A 23 Feb 1947 NYT news item reports that van Druten was to have directed the film, but chose not to, and that the play's Broadway producer, Alfred de Liagre, who was to produce the film as well, left the project because of casting disagreements. According to information included in the MPAA/PCA file on the film at the AMPAS Library, PCA director, Joseph I. Breen obected to John van Druten's play as "a story of illicit sex, without sufficient compensating moral values." In a 3 Jun 1946 letter to Warner Bros. executive Jack L. Warner, Breen advised that "in order to bring this story within the provision of the Production Code, it will be necessary affirmatively to establish that there has been no illicit sex affair between Bill and Sally ." The film was shown on television under the title One for the Book . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Dec 1947.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 46
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 46
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 47
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 47
p. 23.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Dec 47
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
15 Mar 47
p. 41.
New York Times
23 Feb 1947.
---
New York Times
26 Dec 47
p. 22.
Variety
31 Dec 47
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Voice of the Turtle by John van Druten, as produced by Alfred de Liagre, Jr. (New York, 8 Dec 1943).
MUSIC
"Londonderry Air," traditional.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
One for the Book
Release Date:
21 February 1948
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 December 1947
Production Date:
22 February--early May 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 October 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1477
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
103
Length(in feet):
9,241
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12344
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Flighty New York actress Sally Middleton is in love with love. When theatrical producer Kenneth Bartlett gently breaks off their affair in the winter of 1944, a broken-hearted Sally vows that she will never fall in love again. Sally's friend, actress Olive Lashbrooke, takes a different approach to romance. For her, love is a game, and the more players the better. Several months after the end of Sally's affair, Olive arranges to meet her current love interest, Sgt. Bill Page, at Sally's apartment. While she is waiting, Olive calls for her messages and learns that Comm. Ned Burling, a higher-ranking admirer, is in town for one weekend only. Choosing the commander over the sergeant, Olive pretends that Ned is her estranged husband and stands Bill up. To no avail, Bill tries to get another date and finally invites Sally to dinner next-door at the same romantic French restaurant that she frequented with Kenneth. While Bill and Sally are eating, Olive arrives with Ned, but hastily retreats when she spots them together. Later, Olive, whose memories of Ned have turned out to be better than the reality, telephones Sally to question her about Bill. By the time Sally finishes her call, Bill has fallen asleep. Because it is late and raining and difficult to find a room in the city, Sally offers Bill her couch, and he gratefully accepts. The next morning, when Bill awakens, Sally has left for an audition. She gets the part and tries to telephone Bill to explain that the playwright is reading the play to her. He, however, does not answer the phone for fear that ... +


Flighty New York actress Sally Middleton is in love with love. When theatrical producer Kenneth Bartlett gently breaks off their affair in the winter of 1944, a broken-hearted Sally vows that she will never fall in love again. Sally's friend, actress Olive Lashbrooke, takes a different approach to romance. For her, love is a game, and the more players the better. Several months after the end of Sally's affair, Olive arranges to meet her current love interest, Sgt. Bill Page, at Sally's apartment. While she is waiting, Olive calls for her messages and learns that Comm. Ned Burling, a higher-ranking admirer, is in town for one weekend only. Choosing the commander over the sergeant, Olive pretends that Ned is her estranged husband and stands Bill up. To no avail, Bill tries to get another date and finally invites Sally to dinner next-door at the same romantic French restaurant that she frequented with Kenneth. While Bill and Sally are eating, Olive arrives with Ned, but hastily retreats when she spots them together. Later, Olive, whose memories of Ned have turned out to be better than the reality, telephones Sally to question her about Bill. By the time Sally finishes her call, Bill has fallen asleep. Because it is late and raining and difficult to find a room in the city, Sally offers Bill her couch, and he gratefully accepts. The next morning, when Bill awakens, Sally has left for an audition. She gets the part and tries to telephone Bill to explain that the playwright is reading the play to her. He, however, does not answer the phone for fear that his presence in her apartment will damage her reputation. Her eagerness to return to Bill is so distracting that the playwright sends her home. Overnight, spring arrives, prompting Bill to quote a passage from the Bible about "the voice of the turtle." When Sally complains that turtles do not have voices, Bill explains that the passage refers to the turtledove, a sign of spring. Later, Bill asks Sally to get tickets for the latest hit musical, which Kenneth produced. Sally is reluctant to call Kenneth, but after Bill kisses her, she overcomes her qualms and is able to obtain two house seats. Olive and Ned are also at the play. Feeling secure with Bill, Sally is able to be friends again with Kenneth. That night, Bill again plans to stay with Sally, but when she explains that she has given up on love, he leaves for a hotel, after telling her that he loves her. The next morning, Olive telephones Bill at the hotel, and when he does not answer because he has already left for Sally's, she suspects that he has spent the night with Sally and hurries over to confirm her suspicions. Through a ruse, Bill contrives to convince Olive that he arrived after she did. Olive then invites him to lunch and dinner, but he turns her down. Later, Sally is called to rehearse with the lead in her new play. She returns home to find her apartment filled with flowers. Later, Bill asks her to marry him. After Sally admits that she loves him, they sit down to eat the dinner Bill has ordered from the restaurant next door. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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