Whispering Smith (1949)

88 mins | Western | 18 February 1949

Director:

Leslie Fenton

Cinematographer:

Ray Rennahan

Editor:

Archie Marshek

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Walter Tyler

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

A pre-production news item in the LAT stated that Sidney Biddell would be producing this film and that Marion Parsonnet would be writing the screenplay with Karl Lamb; however, Biddell and Parsonnet's contribution to the released film has not been confirmed. According to Par News , for the first time in Hollywood history, a full-scale Western town was built for the film on a studio backlot. The five-acre set included 2,000 feet of railroad track. Locomotives from 1870 that were owned by Paramount were converted from wood-burning to oil for use in the film. Technical advisor Herman H. Larsen was formerly the general manager of Union Pacific Railroad, headquartered in Omaha, NE. Paramount publicized the film as Alan Ladd's first Western and first film in Technicolor. The NYT review remarked, "Considering the law of gravitation and the parabolic course of Alan Ladd, it had to be that this star performer would land, sooner or later, into a Western film." The film marked Brenda Marshall's return to the screen following a three-year absence from the screen to rear her children after her marriage to actor William Holden.
       Frank H. Spearman's novel has been the basis of other motion pictures, beginning in 1916 with the Mutual Film Corp. release Whispering Smith , directed by J. P. MacGowan, starring himself as the title character, with Helen Holmes and Paul C. Hurst. Mutual also released a sequel to the first film in 1916, again directed by MacGowan and starring him, Holmes and Hurst. Universal released a film entitled Money Madness in 1917 which featured the character of ... More Less

A pre-production news item in the LAT stated that Sidney Biddell would be producing this film and that Marion Parsonnet would be writing the screenplay with Karl Lamb; however, Biddell and Parsonnet's contribution to the released film has not been confirmed. According to Par News , for the first time in Hollywood history, a full-scale Western town was built for the film on a studio backlot. The five-acre set included 2,000 feet of railroad track. Locomotives from 1870 that were owned by Paramount were converted from wood-burning to oil for use in the film. Technical advisor Herman H. Larsen was formerly the general manager of Union Pacific Railroad, headquartered in Omaha, NE. Paramount publicized the film as Alan Ladd's first Western and first film in Technicolor. The NYT review remarked, "Considering the law of gravitation and the parabolic course of Alan Ladd, it had to be that this star performer would land, sooner or later, into a Western film." The film marked Brenda Marshall's return to the screen following a three-year absence from the screen to rear her children after her marriage to actor William Holden.
       Frank H. Spearman's novel has been the basis of other motion pictures, beginning in 1916 with the Mutual Film Corp. release Whispering Smith , directed by J. P. MacGowan, starring himself as the title character, with Helen Holmes and Paul C. Hurst. Mutual also released a sequel to the first film in 1916, again directed by MacGowan and starring him, Holmes and Hurst. Universal released a film entitled Money Madness in 1917 which featured the character of Whispering Smith, portrayed by Charles H. Mailes. That film was directed by Henry McRae (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20 ; F1. 2893, 3037 and 4926). Producers Distributing Corp. released Whispering Smith in 1926, directed by George Melford and starring H. B. Warner and Lilyan Tashman (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2. 6286). A serial entitled Whispering Smith Rides was produced by Universal in 1927. Sol Lesser produced a film entitled Whispering Smith Speaks in 1936, a Twentieth Century-Fox release directed by David Howard, starring George O'Brien and Irene Ware. This film, like the 1952 British film released by RKO, Whispering Smith vs. Scotland Yard , was based on the character Whispering Smith, but not on Spearman's novel. An NBC television series that was also based on the character and inspired by the novel ran from 15 May--18 Sep 1961 and starred Audie Murphy, Guy Mitchell and Sam Buffington. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Dec 1948.
---
Daily Variety
6 Dec 48
p. 3, 14
Film Daily
9 Dec 48
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 47
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 47
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 48
p. 4, 8
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 49
p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
7 Feb 1947.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Dec 48
p. 4410.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Dec 48
p. 4418.
New York Times
15 Feb 49
p. 28.
Variety
8 Dec 48
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Railroad tech adv
Prod mgr
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Whispering Smith by Frank H. Spearman (New York, 1906).
SONGS
"Auld Lang Syne," words by Robert Burns, music Scottish traditional.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 February 1949
Production Date:
mid April--mid June 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 February 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2128
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
88
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12494
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the Rocky Mountain division of a western railroad, the Barton brothers, Blake, Leroy and Gabby, a trio of thieving assassins, murder a guard on the Cheyenne express train. Railroad detective Luke Smith, called "Whispering" for his secretive way of investigating, is assigned to the case. In a night manhunt, Luke jumps a train and is reunited with an old friend, Murray Sinclair, who is in charge of the railroad's wrecking crew. A fire up ahead causes the train to stop as the Bartons shoot a depot operator. Arriving on the scene, Luke shoots Gabby and Leroy dead, but Blake escapes. In the mêlée, Luke is shot, but is saved by a harmonica in his pocket that was given to him by Murray's wife Marian, with whom he was once in love. Because his arm was nicked, Luke recuperates at Marian and Murray's ranch and discovers that Murray is involved with nefarious rancher Barney Rebstock and his gang. One day, Marian, who still loves Luke, tells him he should have married her five years earlier, even though he did not think he had enough to offer a wife. Believing Rebstock is hiding Barton in nearby Williams Canyon, Luke goes to town and gives him two days to run Barton out of the canyon. A gunfight follows, in which Luke kills Barton and is nearly killed by Rebstock's partner, Whitey Du Sang, whose involvement proves Rebstock's alliance with Barton. Marian, who has convinced Murray to stop the fight, arrives too late, and runs to Luke in relief, proving to Murray that his best friend and his wife are still in love. Later, ... +


In the Rocky Mountain division of a western railroad, the Barton brothers, Blake, Leroy and Gabby, a trio of thieving assassins, murder a guard on the Cheyenne express train. Railroad detective Luke Smith, called "Whispering" for his secretive way of investigating, is assigned to the case. In a night manhunt, Luke jumps a train and is reunited with an old friend, Murray Sinclair, who is in charge of the railroad's wrecking crew. A fire up ahead causes the train to stop as the Bartons shoot a depot operator. Arriving on the scene, Luke shoots Gabby and Leroy dead, but Blake escapes. In the mêlée, Luke is shot, but is saved by a harmonica in his pocket that was given to him by Murray's wife Marian, with whom he was once in love. Because his arm was nicked, Luke recuperates at Marian and Murray's ranch and discovers that Murray is involved with nefarious rancher Barney Rebstock and his gang. One day, Marian, who still loves Luke, tells him he should have married her five years earlier, even though he did not think he had enough to offer a wife. Believing Rebstock is hiding Barton in nearby Williams Canyon, Luke goes to town and gives him two days to run Barton out of the canyon. A gunfight follows, in which Luke kills Barton and is nearly killed by Rebstock's partner, Whitey Du Sang, whose involvement proves Rebstock's alliance with Barton. Marian, who has convinced Murray to stop the fight, arrives too late, and runs to Luke in relief, proving to Murray that his best friend and his wife are still in love. Later, Luke visits his old friends, Bill and Emmy Dansing, who run the town boardinghouse, and discusses with Bill the possibility that Murray has been funding his ranch by illegal means. Luke's suspicions are confirmed when, at the scene of a railroad wreckage, Murray orders his wrecking crew to fill his wagon with the spoils--much of which is salvageable. After George McCloud, the new division superintendent, orders Murray to unload the "loot" and is backed up by Luke, Murray and his crew defiantly smash the goods, and are fired. Luke admits to McCloud that Murray is stubborn, but agrees to appeal to the railroad president on his behalf to have him reinstated. Luke's request is denied, however, and Murray childishly blames Luke, who leaves town that night without even a good-bye from Murray. Rebstock then makes Murray his partner, and together they sabotage the railroad, derailing trains and stealing transported goods. Murray also begins frequenting the saloon in the evenings and consorting with friendly saloongirls. One night, Marian frankly tells Murray that his friends are wicked men, but he ignores her pleas. The railroad has, meanwhile, hired Luke to investigate the recent thefts, and he returns that night and comforts Marian. In the saloon, Luke tells Murray that everyone knows he was responsible for a recent theft of cattle, and offers to cover for him if he will break with Rebstock. Murray jealously accuses Luke of trying to steal Marian, and slugs him. Marian later tells Luke that she is leaving Murray, but Luke advises her to take Murray away instead so that he has a chance to reform. Murray agrees to leave after one last deal with Rebstock, and that night, during a train hold-up, Whitey kills a guard as Murray looks on. The next day, Luke, Bill and the sheriff lead a posse in search of the killer, and Whitey is identified. Marian tells Luke that Murray never came home after riding out with Rebstock the previous night. Meanwhile, Rebstock distributes the robbery's profits and pays Murray for his ranch. After Murray leaves, Whitey shoots Rebstock and absconds with the money. The posse locates the gang, and during a shootout, Murray is hit in the shoulder. Later, Luke kills Whitey, but allows Murray to escape. Murray returns to the ranch and, finding Marian packing, accuses her of running away with Luke. He then knocks her to the floor and orders her to prepare the buckboard. She finds Luke and Bill waiting in the barn, and Luke sends her with Bill to get a doctor. When Murray tries to shoot Bill and Marian, Luke shoots him in his side. Back in the house, Murray apologizes, while hiding a gun in his shirt. When Luke goes to fix him a drink, Murray pulls his gun on him, but is beaten to the draw by Luke. As his friend lays dying, Luke tells him he would have played it differently, but the only cards he had were the ones Murray dealt him. Murray dies, and Luke slowly rides away from the ranch. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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