The Golden Stallion (1949)

67 mins | Western | 15 November 1949

Director:

William Witney

Writer:

Sloan Nibley

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Tony Martinelli

Production Designer:

Frank Hotaling

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a Var news item, dated 4 Sep 1946, the film's original story was written by James Macar, but he is not credited onscreen, and the extent of his contribution to the released film has not been determined. Modern sources include Karl Hackett in the ... More Less

According to a Var news item, dated 4 Sep 1946, the film's original story was written by James Macar, but he is not credited onscreen, and the extent of his contribution to the released film has not been determined. Modern sources include Karl Hackett in the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Nov 1949.
---
Daily Variety
25 Oct 49
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Oct 49
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 49
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 49
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Oct 49
p. 65.
Variety
4 Sep 1946.
---
Variety
26 Oct 49
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Golden Stallion" and "There's Always Time for a Song," music and lyrics by Sid Robin and Foy Willing
"Night on the Prairie," music and lyrics by Nathan Gluck and Anne Parentean, Spanish lyrics by Aaron Gonzales
"Down Mexico Way," music and lyrics by Eddie Cherkose, Sol Meyer and Jule Styne.
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 November 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 October 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2602
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor
Duration(in mins):
67
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
13900
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On the plains spanning the Mexican-American border region, a gang of smugglers tracks a herd of wild horses roaming freely across the border. They praise the lead horse, whom they call the "bell" mare, and then lasso another horse, which has been branded with a large "X." After they remove the horse's false horseshoe, they open it up and retrieve a small bag of diamonds inside. They then deliver the diamonds to their boss, Oro City Hotel proprietor Jeff Middleton. Meanwhile, rancher Roy Rogers and his men visit their friend, Stormy Billings, owner of the Circle B Ranch. Roy plans to lease the ranch, where he will train roping horses for the local cattle companies, and reveals that he will draw his stock from the wild herd roaming the border. Later, when Roy and his men corner the herd in a canyon, Roy removes the saddle from his horse Trigger and sends him into the herd to calm the other horses. The gang attacks suddenly, however, and Trigger is swept away by the stampeding herd. Roy and his men return to the ranch and tell Stormy's friend, Pepita "Pepi" Valdez, that they are in no mood for the square dance that she has arranged for later. Before long, Trigger returns to the Circle B and coaxes the lead wild mare into the fenced yard. Overjoyed, Roy leads the mare into the stable, and the dance begins on a happy note. Soon, however, Middleton's henchman Art enters the stable and tries to grab the mare. The mare becomes frightened, knocks Art backward, killing him, and then gallops away. Roy discovers Art's corpse, ... +


On the plains spanning the Mexican-American border region, a gang of smugglers tracks a herd of wild horses roaming freely across the border. They praise the lead horse, whom they call the "bell" mare, and then lasso another horse, which has been branded with a large "X." After they remove the horse's false horseshoe, they open it up and retrieve a small bag of diamonds inside. They then deliver the diamonds to their boss, Oro City Hotel proprietor Jeff Middleton. Meanwhile, rancher Roy Rogers and his men visit their friend, Stormy Billings, owner of the Circle B Ranch. Roy plans to lease the ranch, where he will train roping horses for the local cattle companies, and reveals that he will draw his stock from the wild herd roaming the border. Later, when Roy and his men corner the herd in a canyon, Roy removes the saddle from his horse Trigger and sends him into the herd to calm the other horses. The gang attacks suddenly, however, and Trigger is swept away by the stampeding herd. Roy and his men return to the ranch and tell Stormy's friend, Pepita "Pepi" Valdez, that they are in no mood for the square dance that she has arranged for later. Before long, Trigger returns to the Circle B and coaxes the lead wild mare into the fenced yard. Overjoyed, Roy leads the mare into the stable, and the dance begins on a happy note. Soon, however, Middleton's henchman Art enters the stable and tries to grab the mare. The mare becomes frightened, knocks Art backward, killing him, and then gallops away. Roy discovers Art's corpse, and later, Middleton accuses Trigger of being the killer. When the authorities order that Trigger be destroyed, Roy "confesses" to killing Art in order to spare his companion. Roy is then ordered to pay a $5,000 fine and serve a number of years in jail, while the authorities auction off Trigger to the highest bidder: Middleton's henchman Ben. Some time later, the gang teaches Trigger to lead the wild herd back and forth across the border so that they can continue their diamond smuggling. Soon Stormy writes to tell Roy that after the "bell" mare gave birth to a colt, Trigger brought his offspring to live with them at the ranch. Since then, she says, the colt, which they named Trigger, Jr., has grown substantially. Three years later, when Roy is released on parole, the sheriff, who believes in Roy's innocence, agrees to help him stage his own escape and death. After the gang learns of Roy's "escape," they go to the ranch to wait for his arrival. From their hiding place, the gang sees Roy ride up, but before they can act, the sheriff also arrives and shoots at Roy with blanks. Satisfied that he is dead, the gang leaves, and later, captures the branded horse. Instead of the diamonds, however, the gang discovers sand inside. Then, to the gang's amazement, Roy appears, captures them and then lassos Trigger, taming him once again. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.