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HISTORY

The opening credits identify the nightclub used for location shooting as the Blue Angel Night Club in New York City. The closing credits include the following acknowledgment: "This picture was filmed with the obvious good will of many famous stars. The producers wish to thank them." A 28 Mar 1949 HR news item noted that producer Harry Lee Danziger and the staff at Eastern Sound Laboratories in New York City "devised a collapsible dolly and special hangers for lights" for interior shooting. According to a Dec 1948 article in AmCin , the picture was shot entirely without sound. Danziger and his brother, Edward J. Danziger, had been using a highly successful technique of sound dubbing to dub foreign films and decided to use it for Jigsaw , their first feature production. The HCN noted "a recording defect which makes the sound fuzzy, occasionally unintelligible, and frequently out of synchronization with the players' lips." AmCin reported that the producers' search for "natural settings" led them to New York, where "not a single set was built for the entire production. Even the props were those found on the locations." Locations included the interior of the Brooklyn Museum, a Fifth Avenue pet shop, a night club, a large restaurant "of unique design," an apartment house interior and a warehouse. Jigsaw marked the screen directing debut of Fletcher Markle, who, along with Winifred Lenihan and many other cast members, had worked mainly in radio. Franchot Tone and Jean Wallace were married at the time of the production, but divorced shortly ... More Less

The opening credits identify the nightclub used for location shooting as the Blue Angel Night Club in New York City. The closing credits include the following acknowledgment: "This picture was filmed with the obvious good will of many famous stars. The producers wish to thank them." A 28 Mar 1949 HR news item noted that producer Harry Lee Danziger and the staff at Eastern Sound Laboratories in New York City "devised a collapsible dolly and special hangers for lights" for interior shooting. According to a Dec 1948 article in AmCin , the picture was shot entirely without sound. Danziger and his brother, Edward J. Danziger, had been using a highly successful technique of sound dubbing to dub foreign films and decided to use it for Jigsaw , their first feature production. The HCN noted "a recording defect which makes the sound fuzzy, occasionally unintelligible, and frequently out of synchronization with the players' lips." AmCin reported that the producers' search for "natural settings" led them to New York, where "not a single set was built for the entire production. Even the props were those found on the locations." Locations included the interior of the Brooklyn Museum, a Fifth Avenue pet shop, a night club, a large restaurant "of unique design," an apartment house interior and a warehouse. Jigsaw marked the screen directing debut of Fletcher Markle, who, along with Winifred Lenihan and many other cast members, had worked mainly in radio. Franchot Tone and Jean Wallace were married at the time of the production, but divorced shortly thereafter. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Dec 48
p. 412, 427-428.
Box Office
19 Mar 1949.
---
Daily Mirror (NY)
30 Mar 1949.
---
Daily Variety
8 Mar 49
p. 3, 10
Film Daily
11 Mar 49
p. 5.
Hollywood Citizen-News
30 Mar 1949.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 48
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 49
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 49
p. 12.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Mar 49
p. 4530.
New York Times
30 May 49
p. 9.
Variety
9 Mar 49
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
From an orig story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
MAKEUP
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 March 1949
Production Date:
at Eastern Sound Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Tower Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
11 March 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2158
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72
Length(in feet):
6,480
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4682
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After New York City printer Max Borg is murdered, District Attorney Walker, who is assigned to the case, learns that Borg, who had recently been exposed as the printer of propaganda posters for a race hate group called "The Crusaders," was apparently silenced by them. When an article about the group appears in a local newspaper, Walker's deputy, Howard Malloy, visits the author, Charles Riggs, who is also his sister Caroline's fiancé. Later, Charlie is followed home by a mysterious figure, who knocks him unconscious and pushes him out of his high-rise window. After Caroline finds a propaganda poster inside Charlie's room and shows it to Howard, he notices the words "Sigmund Kosterich, Rembrandt Studios" printed on the back. Howard goes to Kosterich's shop, posing as a potential customer, but Kosterich insists he does not print posters. Before leaving, Howard admires Kosterich's painting of a lovely singer named Barbara Whitfield. When a man follows Howard home, Howard draws his gun, grabs the man's wallet and learns that his name is Miller. Inside the wallet, he finds a newspaper advertisement for Barbara's nightclub act and a card with an address and the words "See the Angel" printed on it. Howard goes to the address, which turns out to be the headquarters of the Mohawk Political Club. There, he introduces himself to "The Angel," Angelo Agostini, who offers to help him win a promotion to special prosecutor. Later, when Howard's friend, socialite Grace Hartley, hears Howard's name linked to Angel's, she warns him against associating with unsavory characters. Howard attends a party at Grace's house, then leaves after receiving a message from his ... +


After New York City printer Max Borg is murdered, District Attorney Walker, who is assigned to the case, learns that Borg, who had recently been exposed as the printer of propaganda posters for a race hate group called "The Crusaders," was apparently silenced by them. When an article about the group appears in a local newspaper, Walker's deputy, Howard Malloy, visits the author, Charles Riggs, who is also his sister Caroline's fiancé. Later, Charlie is followed home by a mysterious figure, who knocks him unconscious and pushes him out of his high-rise window. After Caroline finds a propaganda poster inside Charlie's room and shows it to Howard, he notices the words "Sigmund Kosterich, Rembrandt Studios" printed on the back. Howard goes to Kosterich's shop, posing as a potential customer, but Kosterich insists he does not print posters. Before leaving, Howard admires Kosterich's painting of a lovely singer named Barbara Whitfield. When a man follows Howard home, Howard draws his gun, grabs the man's wallet and learns that his name is Miller. Inside the wallet, he finds a newspaper advertisement for Barbara's nightclub act and a card with an address and the words "See the Angel" printed on it. Howard goes to the address, which turns out to be the headquarters of the Mohawk Political Club. There, he introduces himself to "The Angel," Angelo Agostini, who offers to help him win a promotion to special prosecutor. Later, when Howard's friend, socialite Grace Hartley, hears Howard's name linked to Angel's, she warns him against associating with unsavory characters. Howard attends a party at Grace's house, then leaves after receiving a message from his partner, Tommy Quigley. After her show at the Blue Angel nightclub, Barbara meets Howard, and although she is Angel's sweetheart, Howard kisses her. When Angel sees Barbara with Howard, he becomes jealous and orders her to break it off with him. Later, Barbara tells Howard about The Crusaders' racist agenda, and when he tries to kiss her, she surmises that he is only after information and pushes him off the couch. Howard is knocked unconscious when his head hits the coffee table, and while he is unconscious, Grace, the secret head of The Crusaders, arrives, shoots Barbara to death and escapes. Howard revives, and when Kosterich shows up, Howard assumes he is the murderer. Kosterich blames Grace, who unknown to him, is eavesdropping in the hallway outside, then tells Howard that he found evidence of her involvement with The Crusaders while painting a portrait at her house. When Grace overhears Kosterich say that he has hidden the evidence behind one of his paintings at the museum, she rushes out, followed by Angel and Miller, who is also known as "Knuckles." At the museum, Grace knocks out the night watchman, while Howard phones Quigley and tells him to come to the museum. After Howard and Kosterich arrive and find the watchman, Howard goes after Angel, while Kosterich creeps up behind Grace. Howard then shoots Angel, and Grace shoots Kosterich. When Miller arrives and fires at Howard, Kosterich grabs Howard's gun and shoots Grace. Just then, several squad cars arrive at the scene, and Caroline is so relieved to see that her brother is unhurt that she kisses him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.