Look for the Silver Lining (1949)

106 or 109 mins | Musical | 30 July 1949

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

William Jacobs

Cinematographer:

Peverell Marley

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's working title was Silver Lining . Marilyn Miller was born in 1898 in Ohio and, before she was five, joined the Five Columbians, a vaudeville act headed by her mother and stepfather, Caro Miller. Because of ordinances that prohibited children under sixteen from performing, the act principally played in small towns in the United States, as well as in Cuba, Honolulu and Europe. In London, theatrical producer Lee Shubert saw Marilyn dance and hired her for his New York City Passing Show of 1914 , which made her a star at sixteen. Later, she starred in numerous revues produced by Florenz Ziegfeld. Miller starred in the 1930 film version of Sunny (See Entry). She was married three times: Her first husband, Frank Carter, was killed in a car accident a year after their marriage. She then married actor Jack Pickford, brother of Mary Pickford, and, several years after their divorce, married a much younger chorus boy named Chet O'Brien. Miller died of toxic poisoning after a brief illness in 1936 at the age of 38. Judy Garland played Miller in the 1946 M-G-M film Till the Clouds Roll By (see below), and the character of Sally Manners in The Great Zeigfeld is also based on her (See Entry).
       A 2 Feb 1944 HR news item noted that Ginger Rogers was approached to play Miller. According to an Oct 1944 press release, Irving Rapper was to direct the film. A 30 May 1945 press release announced that Joan Leslie was to star, and a press release from Aug 1945 ... More Less

The film's working title was Silver Lining . Marilyn Miller was born in 1898 in Ohio and, before she was five, joined the Five Columbians, a vaudeville act headed by her mother and stepfather, Caro Miller. Because of ordinances that prohibited children under sixteen from performing, the act principally played in small towns in the United States, as well as in Cuba, Honolulu and Europe. In London, theatrical producer Lee Shubert saw Marilyn dance and hired her for his New York City Passing Show of 1914 , which made her a star at sixteen. Later, she starred in numerous revues produced by Florenz Ziegfeld. Miller starred in the 1930 film version of Sunny (See Entry). She was married three times: Her first husband, Frank Carter, was killed in a car accident a year after their marriage. She then married actor Jack Pickford, brother of Mary Pickford, and, several years after their divorce, married a much younger chorus boy named Chet O'Brien. Miller died of toxic poisoning after a brief illness in 1936 at the age of 38. Judy Garland played Miller in the 1946 M-G-M film Till the Clouds Roll By (see below), and the character of Sally Manners in The Great Zeigfeld is also based on her (See Entry).
       A 2 Feb 1944 HR news item noted that Ginger Rogers was approached to play Miller. According to an Oct 1944 press release, Irving Rapper was to direct the film. A 30 May 1945 press release announced that Joan Leslie was to star, and a press release from Aug 1945 noted that Lynn Root would write the screenplay. In 1949, Alice Donahue, the widow of dancer Jack Donahue, who died at age 38 in 1930, sued Warner Bros. for $350,000, charging that the studio violated her right to privacy by portraying Donahue without her permission. Alice Donahue lost the lawsuit. Ray Heindorf was nominated for an Academy Award for the film's musical score. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Jul 1949.
---
Daily Variety
23 Jun 49
p. 3, 10
Daily Variety
13 Nov 51
p. 5.
Film Daily
1 Jul 49
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 48
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 49
p. 3, 13
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 1954.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Jun 49
p. 4658.
New York Times
24 Jun 49
p. 29.
Variety
29 Jun 49
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
From a story by
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
Men's cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Mus numbers staged and dir by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Look for the Silver Lining," music and lyrics by Jerome Kern and B. G. DeSylva
"Time on My Hands," music and lyrics by Vincent Youmans, Harold Adamson and Mack Gordon
"Who" and "Sunny," music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein, II
+
SONGS
"Look for the Silver Lining," music and lyrics by Jerome Kern and B. G. DeSylva
"Time on My Hands," music and lyrics by Vincent Youmans, Harold Adamson and Mack Gordon
"Who" and "Sunny," music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein, II
"A Kiss in the Dark," music and lyrics by Victor Herbert and B. G. DeSylva
"Yama-Yama Man," music by Karl Hoschna, lyrics by Collin Davis
"Can't Yo' Heah Me Callin', Caroline?" music by Caro Roma, lyrics by William H. Gardner
"Shine on, Harvest Moon," music by Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth, lyrics by Jack Norworth
"Wild Rose," music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Clifford Grey.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Silver Lining
Release Date:
30 July 1949
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 23 June 1949
Production Date:
late March--mid July 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 July 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2437
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
106 or 109
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the 1930s, theatrical star Marilyn Miller becomes dizzy during a rehearsal. While she rests in her dressing room, she is reminded of her past when a man from her hometown of Findlay, Ohio brings her an old vaudeville poster announcing a performance of the Five Columbians, her family's act: Teenage Marilyn leaves school to join her parents and her sisters, Claire and Ruth, at the vaudeville theater where they are performing. There, she meets her idol, dancer Jack Donahue. After the entire family, except for Marilyn, is quarantined with the mumps, Jack invites Marilyn to dance and sing with him, and she is so popular that she is made a regular part of the family's act. While the Five Columbians are playing theaters in London, Jack brings a Broadway producer to see Marilyn perform alone, and, in 1914, she appears in her first Broadway show. She takes an instant dislike to her partner, Frank Carter, but when an investigator from the Gerry Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children correctly suspects that she is underage and demands her birth certificate, Frank invents a plausible story, and Marilyn is able to go on. On opening night, Frank gives Marilyn a small ceramic elephant for luck. After war is declared in 1914, Frank joins the Army, and Marilyn asks him to marry her before he leaves. He suggests that they wait until after the war, and when he returns, the couple elopes. Frank continues the tradition of sending her an elephant on opening night, but when she opens in Sally , the talisman arrives late and broken. ... +


In the 1930s, theatrical star Marilyn Miller becomes dizzy during a rehearsal. While she rests in her dressing room, she is reminded of her past when a man from her hometown of Findlay, Ohio brings her an old vaudeville poster announcing a performance of the Five Columbians, her family's act: Teenage Marilyn leaves school to join her parents and her sisters, Claire and Ruth, at the vaudeville theater where they are performing. There, she meets her idol, dancer Jack Donahue. After the entire family, except for Marilyn, is quarantined with the mumps, Jack invites Marilyn to dance and sing with him, and she is so popular that she is made a regular part of the family's act. While the Five Columbians are playing theaters in London, Jack brings a Broadway producer to see Marilyn perform alone, and, in 1914, she appears in her first Broadway show. She takes an instant dislike to her partner, Frank Carter, but when an investigator from the Gerry Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children correctly suspects that she is underage and demands her birth certificate, Frank invents a plausible story, and Marilyn is able to go on. On opening night, Frank gives Marilyn a small ceramic elephant for luck. After war is declared in 1914, Frank joins the Army, and Marilyn asks him to marry her before he leaves. He suggests that they wait until after the war, and when he returns, the couple elopes. Frank continues the tradition of sending her an elephant on opening night, but when she opens in Sally , the talisman arrives late and broken. After the show, Marilyn learns that Frank has been killed in a car accident. When Sally closes, Marilyn retires, but cannot stand idleness. She begs to play the lead in a new play called Sunny , ignoring the advice of her manager. Because the play's producer, Henry Doran, first became interested in the theater after seeing Marilyn perform as a child, he naturally insists that she play the lead. Henry falls in love with Marilyn, but she is hesitant to accept his proposal. Back in the present, Jack visits Marilyn's dressing room, and during their conversation, he discloses that he has always wanted to die onstage on closing night of a big hit. Learning of Marilyn's dizziness, Henry, who is now her husband, wants to call a doctor, but Marilyn, who has already seen a doctor, pretends that her spell was nothing serious. Once alone with Jack, Marilyn admits that the doctor advised her to cut out dancing and late nights, but she realizes that without the theater, her life would be meaningless. She decides to continue, and the play opens on schedule. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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