Mrs. Mike (1949)

98 mins | Drama | 23 December 1949

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HISTORY

Benedict and Nancy Freedman's novel was based on the real-life adventures of Mrs. Michael (Katherine Mary) Flannigan, who traveled to the Canadian northwoods in 1905. The novel was published in 1947, while also appearing serially in Atlantic Monthly (Feb--Apr 1947). Regal Films, Inc. was jointly owned by Dick Powell, Sam Bischoff and Edward Gross. According to an Aug 1948 Var news item, RKO head Howard Hughes first considered releasing the picture. According to Var , June Allyson (who was married to Powell) was considered for the starring role. Also considered for roles were Barbara Bel Geddes, Peggy Cummins, Barbara Bates, Joanne Dru, Betsy Drake and Diana Lynn. Mrs. Mike appeared on HR production charts for a three-and-a-half month period from late Mar 1949 to mid-Jul 1949. Beginning on 2 Jun 1949, however, the production was halted for approximately three weeks due to script revisions. On 17 May 1949, HR reported that the producers had called for 100 square dancers to be used in the film. A 4 May 1949 HR news item notes that Sherman Saunders was scheduled to be the square dance caller, but his participation in the released film has not been confirmed. Studio press information and DV credit Lee Zavitz with special effects, although J. R. Rabin is credited onscreen in that capacity. In Sep 1948, HR reported that Yellow Knife, Canada and Samuel Goldwyn Studios were being considered for locations and studios, but they have not been confirmed. As noted in HR , portions of the film were shot in Alberta, Canada ... More Less

Benedict and Nancy Freedman's novel was based on the real-life adventures of Mrs. Michael (Katherine Mary) Flannigan, who traveled to the Canadian northwoods in 1905. The novel was published in 1947, while also appearing serially in Atlantic Monthly (Feb--Apr 1947). Regal Films, Inc. was jointly owned by Dick Powell, Sam Bischoff and Edward Gross. According to an Aug 1948 Var news item, RKO head Howard Hughes first considered releasing the picture. According to Var , June Allyson (who was married to Powell) was considered for the starring role. Also considered for roles were Barbara Bel Geddes, Peggy Cummins, Barbara Bates, Joanne Dru, Betsy Drake and Diana Lynn. Mrs. Mike appeared on HR production charts for a three-and-a-half month period from late Mar 1949 to mid-Jul 1949. Beginning on 2 Jun 1949, however, the production was halted for approximately three weeks due to script revisions. On 17 May 1949, HR reported that the producers had called for 100 square dancers to be used in the film. A 4 May 1949 HR news item notes that Sherman Saunders was scheduled to be the square dance caller, but his participation in the released film has not been confirmed. Studio press information and DV credit Lee Zavitz with special effects, although J. R. Rabin is credited onscreen in that capacity. In Sep 1948, HR reported that Yellow Knife, Canada and Samuel Goldwyn Studios were being considered for locations and studios, but they have not been confirmed. As noted in HR , portions of the film were shot in Alberta, Canada and Sun Valley, ID. A 27 Sep 1949 HR news item notes that National Screen Service was preparing six two-minute television trailers to promote the film. As reported in Virginia Wright's column in DV on 17 May 1947, Katherine Flannigan, then a widow, came to Hollywood in 1945 and submitted a story outline to agent Laura Wilk; Wilk turned down the story, but saw potential in Flannigan's life story, and paired her up with the young husband and wife writing team of Benedict and Nancy Freedman. In the spring of 1951, Katherine Flannigan sued the film's producers and the authors for an unpaid balance of $25,000 due to her for the rights to her story. The suit was dropped on 23 Jul 1951 on the basis that only the Freedmans, not the producers, were contractually bound to Flannigan. Dick Powell reprised his role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 24 Apr 1950, co-starring Gene Tierney. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Dec 1949.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 1947.
---
Daily Variety
19 Dec 49
p. 3, 11
Film Daily
22 Dec 49
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 48
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 49
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 49
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 49
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 49
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 49
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1951.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Dec 49
p. 129.
New York Times
9 Feb 49
p. 36.
Variety
16 Aug 1948.
---
Variety
14 Sep 1948.
---
Variety
25 Mar 1949.
---
Variety
21 Dec 49
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Samuel Bischoff Production, in association with Huntington Hartford
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Prod supv
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Ward des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus supv
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
DANCE
Barn dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
Prod asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Mrs. Mike: The Story of Katherine Mary Flannigan by Benedict and Nancy Freedman (New York, 1947).
SONGS
"The Rose of Tralee," music by Charles W. Glover, lyrics by C. Mordaunt Spencer
"Kathy," music and lyrics by Max Steiner and Ned Washington.
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 December 1949
Production Date:
late March--early June 1949
22 June--mid July 1949 at General Service Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Regal Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 December 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2694
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
98
Length(in feet):
8,877
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Kathy O'Fallon arrives from Boston to her uncle John's cabin near the Canadian border and meets Sgt. Mike Flannigan of the Canadian North West Mounted Police. They marry in the middle of winter, and he takes her, by dogsled, to the remote northwest village of Hendricks Hole, where his duties include emergency tooth extractions, vaccinating Indians from smallpox, and setting the broken legs of sled dogs. Kathy soon becomes pregnant, and after the baby of her best friend, Mrs. Howard, is born dead, she insists Mike transfer to a larger settlement for the birth. When Kathy is in her third trimester, they travel by canoe to Fort Manette, and she is forced to wait in a remote cabin with its owner, the stern Mrs. Mathers, while Mike fetches a doctor. After a day of delirium, Kathy wakes to find that she has given birth to a girl with the help of a kind midwife named Sarah Carpentier, who becomes Kathy's best friend at the fort. One day, Sarah's son Pierre's arm is crushed by a boulder, and has to be amputated. Sarah is greatly disturbed by the tragedy, but her friend, Georgette Beauclaire, is grateful that the boy is alive and tells Kathy that her own daughters, Madeleine and Barbette, are her third family. When a woman lives in such remote regions, Georgette explains, she expects to rebuild her family over and over again after the inevitable death of loved ones. Kathy, Mike and little Mary live happily until, at age eighteen months, Mary dies from diphtheria during an epidemic. Kathy, unable to handle the brutalities of life in an isolated settlement, leaves ... +


Kathy O'Fallon arrives from Boston to her uncle John's cabin near the Canadian border and meets Sgt. Mike Flannigan of the Canadian North West Mounted Police. They marry in the middle of winter, and he takes her, by dogsled, to the remote northwest village of Hendricks Hole, where his duties include emergency tooth extractions, vaccinating Indians from smallpox, and setting the broken legs of sled dogs. Kathy soon becomes pregnant, and after the baby of her best friend, Mrs. Howard, is born dead, she insists Mike transfer to a larger settlement for the birth. When Kathy is in her third trimester, they travel by canoe to Fort Manette, and she is forced to wait in a remote cabin with its owner, the stern Mrs. Mathers, while Mike fetches a doctor. After a day of delirium, Kathy wakes to find that she has given birth to a girl with the help of a kind midwife named Sarah Carpentier, who becomes Kathy's best friend at the fort. One day, Sarah's son Pierre's arm is crushed by a boulder, and has to be amputated. Sarah is greatly disturbed by the tragedy, but her friend, Georgette Beauclaire, is grateful that the boy is alive and tells Kathy that her own daughters, Madeleine and Barbette, are her third family. When a woman lives in such remote regions, Georgette explains, she expects to rebuild her family over and over again after the inevitable death of loved ones. Kathy, Mike and little Mary live happily until, at age eighteen months, Mary dies from diphtheria during an epidemic. Kathy, unable to handle the brutalities of life in an isolated settlement, leaves Mike to return to Boston. However, when Mike sadly returns to his and Kathy's first home in Hendricks Hole, he finds Kathy waiting for him. After seeing Mrs. Howard's new healthy baby girl, Kathy says, she decided it was time to start a new family with Mike. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.