Square Dance Jubilee (1949)

79 mins | Musical, Western | 11 November 1949

Director:

Paul Landres

Producer:

Ron Ormond

Cinematographer:

Ernest Miller

Editor:

Hugh Winn

Production Designer:

Fred Preble

Production Company:

Lippert Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

As the viewed print was missing approximately eleven minutes, certain plot details were derived from a cutting continuity in the copyright registration. The instrumental "Tennessee Wagoner" was published as "Tennessee ... More Less

As the viewed print was missing approximately eleven minutes, certain plot details were derived from a cutting continuity in the copyright registration. The instrumental "Tennessee Wagoner" was published as "Tennessee Wagner." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Nov 1949.
---
Daily Variety
7 Nov 49
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Nov 49
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 49
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Nov 49
p. 90.
Variety
9 Nov 49
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Donald Barry Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial [dir]
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc exec
Prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
Sd eng
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
"Jubilee" dance seq conceived and dir by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Shame on You" by Spade Cooley
"Ida Red" by Wava White
"Tennessee Wagoner" by Spade Cooley and Smokey Rogers
+
MUSIC
"Shame on You" by Spade Cooley
"Ida Red" by Wava White
"Tennessee Wagoner" by Spade Cooley and Smokey Rogers
"Pop Goes the Weasel," traditional.
+
SONGS
"Square Dance Jubilee," words and music by June Carr and Ray Broome
"Gotta Soft Spot (In My Heart)," words and music by David Street, Sam Freedman and Jules L. Fox
"Mr. Sears and Roebuck," words and music by Al Gannaway, Ray Gilbert and William Okie
+
SONGS
"Square Dance Jubilee," words and music by June Carr and Ray Broome
"Gotta Soft Spot (In My Heart)," words and music by David Street, Sam Freedman and Jules L. Fox
"Mr. Sears and Roebuck," words and music by Al Gannaway, Ray Gilbert and William Okie
"Joan of Arkansas," words and music by Al Gannaway, Edward Baxter, Lester Pine and Marvin David
"The Gal with the Blue Mink Jeans," words and music by Al Gannaway
"You've Got Me Wrapped Around Your Finger," words and music by Spade Cooley and Lew Porter
"Send Me the Pillow You Dream On," words and music by Hank Locklin
"Hangman's Boogie," words and music by Larry Cassidy
"Moon Over Texas," words and music by Ron Ormond and Millard Guy
"I Came Here to Be Went With," "It's Dark Outside," "Signed, Sealed and Delivered," "Blue Pacific Waltz," "Hillbilly Gal," "Yodeling Blues," "It's a Boy" and "Mocking Bird," composers undetermined.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 November 1949
Production Date:
late Jul 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 November 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2658
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79
Length(in feet):
7,087
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14092
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York, television executive G. K. signs Spade Cooley and his band to a fifty-two week contract, but as he needs other Western acts to support him, gives talent scouts Don Blake and Sam "Seldom" Jenks two weeks to find more performers. After buying themselves dude Western outfits, Don and Seldom head by car to Prairie City. Meanwhile, Barbara Clayton, owner of the Star Ranch, is having rustling problems, so Charlie Jordan, her foreman, goes to see saloon owner Jed Stratton, whom he suspects is behind the thefts, and accuses him of stealing the ranch's cattle. After Charlie leaves the saloon, Stratton orders his henchman, Buck, to get rid of him, and Buck shoots Charlie on his way back to the ranch. Don and Seldom find Charlie and take him to a hospital, then go to the Star Ranch. When one of the ranch hands suggests that Don and Seldom may have shot Charlie, Don gets into a fistfight with him and beats him. Upon arriving in Prairie City, Don visits Stratton's Frontier Saloon, as Charlie had mumbled something about "frontier" before passing out. Don and Seldom stage a brawl to attract Stratton's attention, then Don tells Stratton about their talent search. After Stratton offers to let them use his saloon as their headquarters, Don and Seldom check out one of Stratton's line shacks and find several branding irons. Stratton later agrees to allow Don to televise a talent contest from his saloon. Although he suspects that Don and Seldom may be detectives, Stratton figures that, with everybody in town for the show, his men will be able to rustle more cattle. Later, the sheriff says that a ... +


In New York, television executive G. K. signs Spade Cooley and his band to a fifty-two week contract, but as he needs other Western acts to support him, gives talent scouts Don Blake and Sam "Seldom" Jenks two weeks to find more performers. After buying themselves dude Western outfits, Don and Seldom head by car to Prairie City. Meanwhile, Barbara Clayton, owner of the Star Ranch, is having rustling problems, so Charlie Jordan, her foreman, goes to see saloon owner Jed Stratton, whom he suspects is behind the thefts, and accuses him of stealing the ranch's cattle. After Charlie leaves the saloon, Stratton orders his henchman, Buck, to get rid of him, and Buck shoots Charlie on his way back to the ranch. Don and Seldom find Charlie and take him to a hospital, then go to the Star Ranch. When one of the ranch hands suggests that Don and Seldom may have shot Charlie, Don gets into a fistfight with him and beats him. Upon arriving in Prairie City, Don visits Stratton's Frontier Saloon, as Charlie had mumbled something about "frontier" before passing out. Don and Seldom stage a brawl to attract Stratton's attention, then Don tells Stratton about their talent search. After Stratton offers to let them use his saloon as their headquarters, Don and Seldom check out one of Stratton's line shacks and find several branding irons. Stratton later agrees to allow Don to televise a talent contest from his saloon. Although he suspects that Don and Seldom may be detectives, Stratton figures that, with everybody in town for the show, his men will be able to rustle more cattle. Later, the sheriff says that a part of Seldom's spur, which had been planted by Stratton's men, has been found at the site of a rustling raid and arrests him. However, Don, who has become romantically involved with Barbara, tells the sheriff all he knows about the rustling activities, and they agree to keep Seldom in jail, as Don thinks they can trap Stratton when he tries to silence Seldom. The television broadcast gets under way and many performers appear. During the show, Don is tipped off that Clark, one of Stratton's men, is on his way to the jail. Clark lets Seldom out of his cell, explaining that his case has been cleared up, and tells him to leave. Having anticipated the set-up, Don, with gun drawn, interrupts and tells Clark to change clothes with Seldom. From across the street, Stratton then mistakenly shoots at Clark as he runs out of the jail, dressed like Seldom. When Dan goes to Stratton's office and informs him of what he has done, they struggle and Stratton runs onto the set of the television show, where the fight continues. Don is triumphant and turns Stratton over to the sheriff. Later, Don and Barbara marry, and when they and Seldom return to New York, G. K. congratulates them on the fine acts they have found and gives them a choice of a new assignment, a show about folk singers or one about hula dancers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.