Streets of Laredo (1949)

92 mins | Western | 27 May 1949

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HISTORY

This film is a remake of Paramount's 1936 film The Texas Rangers , directed by King Vidor and starring Fred MacMurray, Jack Oakie, Jean Parker and Lloyd Nolan (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.4519). Although The Texas Rangers was based in part on a Walter Prescott Webb book of the same name, Streets of Laredo is based on Louis Stevens and Elizabeth Hill's screenplay for The Texas Rangers , and they are given onscreen story credit for Streets of Laredo . According to an Aug 1947 HR news item, Paramount bought the rights to a Norman Reilly Raine story titled "Streets of Laredo," intending to produce a film from it "on a major scale." However, although Raine is listed in connection with this film along with writers Charles Marquis Warren and Lynn Root in papers in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, and Warren and Root collaborated on a draft of the script, neither Raine nor Root are credited in any other source, and the extent of their contribution to the final film has not been determined. Although Paramount initially hoped to shoot the film "against the panorama of Texas," location filming was done in Gallup, NM, according to HR . Some scenes were shot at the Ray Corrigan Ranch in Simi Valley, ... More Less

This film is a remake of Paramount's 1936 film The Texas Rangers , directed by King Vidor and starring Fred MacMurray, Jack Oakie, Jean Parker and Lloyd Nolan (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.4519). Although The Texas Rangers was based in part on a Walter Prescott Webb book of the same name, Streets of Laredo is based on Louis Stevens and Elizabeth Hill's screenplay for The Texas Rangers , and they are given onscreen story credit for Streets of Laredo . According to an Aug 1947 HR news item, Paramount bought the rights to a Norman Reilly Raine story titled "Streets of Laredo," intending to produce a film from it "on a major scale." However, although Raine is listed in connection with this film along with writers Charles Marquis Warren and Lynn Root in papers in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, and Warren and Root collaborated on a draft of the script, neither Raine nor Root are credited in any other source, and the extent of their contribution to the final film has not been determined. Although Paramount initially hoped to shoot the film "against the panorama of Texas," location filming was done in Gallup, NM, according to HR . Some scenes were shot at the Ray Corrigan Ranch in Simi Valley, CA. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Feb 1949.
---
Daily Variety
7 Feb 49
pp. 3-4.
Film Daily
10 Feb 49
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 47
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 48
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 48
p. 3, 5
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Feb 49
pp. 4493-94.
New York Times
12 May 49
p. 28.
Variety
9 Feb 49
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Stills
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Props
Asst props
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Transparencies
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
Scr clerk
Scr clerk
STAND INS
Double for William Holden
Double for Macdonald Carey
Double for William Bendix
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Streets of Laredo (The Cowboy's Lament)," traditional, arrangement and new lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 May 1949
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 May 1949
Production Date:
13 July--26 August 1948
added scenes and retakes: 27 August--31 August 1948, 15 and 17 September 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 May 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2314
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
92
Length(in feet):
8,346
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In 1878, outlaws Jim Dawkins, Lorn Reming and Wahoo Jones rob a stagecoach, but later save teenager Rannie Carter from ruthless tax collector Charley Calico, who has murdered her uncle and stolen his cattle. When orphan Rannie tags along, Wahoo tells her that they are cattle inspectors. To get rid of Rannie, Lorn pays elderly rancher Pop Lint $500 to pretend that he is a family friend and take Rannie in as a boarder. Lorn is then separated from Jim and Wahoo when Calico and his gang chase them. Over the course of the next year, Lorn earns a reputation as a notorious outlaw. In order to save Lorn's life, Jim and Wahoo foil his attempt to rob a stagecoach carrying Texas Rangers, and are reluctantly sworn in as Rangers. Jim and Wahoo are quickly tested, however. after Lorn escapes, apparently due to their negligence. After the Rangers are assigned to protect a large cattle herd being driven to Mexico, Lorn steals a portion of the herd, then allows Jim and Wahoo to capture the herd to regain their standing with the Rangers. From then on, Jim and Wahoo give Lorn advance notice of all cattle drives. Not long after, Rannie, now a young woman, asks the Rangers to protect her and Pop Lint from Calico, who controls the territory. By law, the Rangers can only respond to a request made by the mayor of a town, so Jim and Wahoo convince Lorn to help. Lorn agrees to get rid of Calico, but secretly intends to take over Calico's domain. Lorn first forces the sheriff to file a formal request for help with the ... +


In 1878, outlaws Jim Dawkins, Lorn Reming and Wahoo Jones rob a stagecoach, but later save teenager Rannie Carter from ruthless tax collector Charley Calico, who has murdered her uncle and stolen his cattle. When orphan Rannie tags along, Wahoo tells her that they are cattle inspectors. To get rid of Rannie, Lorn pays elderly rancher Pop Lint $500 to pretend that he is a family friend and take Rannie in as a boarder. Lorn is then separated from Jim and Wahoo when Calico and his gang chase them. Over the course of the next year, Lorn earns a reputation as a notorious outlaw. In order to save Lorn's life, Jim and Wahoo foil his attempt to rob a stagecoach carrying Texas Rangers, and are reluctantly sworn in as Rangers. Jim and Wahoo are quickly tested, however. after Lorn escapes, apparently due to their negligence. After the Rangers are assigned to protect a large cattle herd being driven to Mexico, Lorn steals a portion of the herd, then allows Jim and Wahoo to capture the herd to regain their standing with the Rangers. From then on, Jim and Wahoo give Lorn advance notice of all cattle drives. Not long after, Rannie, now a young woman, asks the Rangers to protect her and Pop Lint from Calico, who controls the territory. By law, the Rangers can only respond to a request made by the mayor of a town, so Jim and Wahoo convince Lorn to help. Lorn agrees to get rid of Calico, but secretly intends to take over Calico's domain. Lorn first forces the sheriff to file a formal request for help with the Rangers. Jim and Wahoo then head out to arrest Calico, whose ranch is near Pop's, and find that Calico and his gang have burned down Pop's stables, causing Pop to die of a heart attack. Jim kills Calico after he brutally tortures one of the Rangers, and Jim is declared a hero. Now determined to go straight, Jim calls off his arrangement with Lorn, who agrees to stay out of the territory. Lorn starts pursuing Rannie, however, becoming Jim's rival for her affection. Rannie rejects Jim's marriage proposal in favor of the suave Lorn, but soon realizes her mistake when Lorn tries to force himself on her. Thrown out by Rannie and rejected by his friends, Lorn busies himself with making trouble for the Rangers. When Lorn is shot and wounded after falling into a Ranger trap, he escapes to Rannie's house, where Jim removes the bullet. Rannie takes care of Lorn while he convalesces, and becomes as convinced of Lorn's evil nature as she is of Jim's goodness. Jim resigns from the Rangers after a manhunt is mounted to find Lorn, but is then arrested for his prior crimes. Wahoo goes after Lorn alone, but is killed in cold blood. Jim demands to be released so he can avenge Wahoo's death, and after Lorn takes Rannie hostage, having promised to leave Jim unharmed, Jim tracks him down in Laredo and refuses to let him escape. The former friends are forced into a gunfight, but it is Rannie who ultimately kills Lorn and avenges Wahoo's death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.