Trail of the Yukon (1949)

67 mins | Drama | 31 July 1949

Director:

William Beaudine

Writer:

Oliver Drake

Producer:

Lindsley Parsons

Cinematographer:

William Sickner

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Although the character played by Dan Seymour is listed as "Duval" in the Var review, he is called "LaRue" in the film. Although the HR production charts, SAB and Monogram production credits list William Beaudine as the director of this film, the onscreen credits credit him under his pseudonym, William X. Crowley. In the Monogram production sheets, Wilbur Mack is listed as the "Teller," but in the Var review, Harrison Hearne is credited in that role. In his biography, screenwriter Oliver Drake claims that he wrote the original story for this picture, even though James Oliver Curwood's novel is credited as the source in the reviews and onscreen credits. This was the first of ten films inspired by Curwood's stories that Monogram produced. All of the films starred Kirby Grant and Chinook as his faithful dog.
Curwood's novel was credited as the source of the 1925 Davis Distributing release, The Gold Hunters , directed by Paul Hurst and starring David Butler. Monogram also produced a 1952 film inspired by Curwood's novel, Yukon Gold , released in 1952, directed by Frank McDonald and starring Kirby Grant (see ... More Less

Although the character played by Dan Seymour is listed as "Duval" in the Var review, he is called "LaRue" in the film. Although the HR production charts, SAB and Monogram production credits list William Beaudine as the director of this film, the onscreen credits credit him under his pseudonym, William X. Crowley. In the Monogram production sheets, Wilbur Mack is listed as the "Teller," but in the Var review, Harrison Hearne is credited in that role. In his biography, screenwriter Oliver Drake claims that he wrote the original story for this picture, even though James Oliver Curwood's novel is credited as the source in the reviews and onscreen credits. This was the first of ten films inspired by Curwood's stories that Monogram produced. All of the films starred Kirby Grant and Chinook as his faithful dog.
Curwood's novel was credited as the source of the 1925 Davis Distributing release, The Gold Hunters , directed by Paul Hurst and starring David Butler. Monogram also produced a 1952 film inspired by Curwood's novel, Yukon Gold , released in 1952, directed by Frank McDonald and starring Kirby Grant (see entries). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Aug 1949.
---
Daily Variety
28 Jul 49
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Aug 49
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 1949.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Aug 49
p. 4706.
Variety
3 Aug 49
p. 16.
Variety
12 Oct 49
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Lindsley Parsons Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Supv ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Set cont
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel The Gold Hunters by James Oliver Curwood (Indianapolis, 1909).
SONGS
"A Shantyman's Life," composer undetermined.
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
31 July 1949
Production Date:
18019
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
31 July 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2547
Duration(in mins):
67
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13915
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the Candian Northwest, outlaws Muskeg Joe, Buck and Rand, and miner Matt Blaine rob the Lebeck bank of $150,000. Matt's son Jim reluctantly takes part in the robbery because Dawson, the owner of the bank, has defrauded Matt of his mining claim. Later, at the Blaine cabin, Muskeg pulls out his gun and demands the money, but Jim and Matt overpower Muskeg and his men and escape in their canoe, the outlaws in hot pursuit. Down river, Mountie Bob McDonald, dressed in civilian clothes, and his dog Chinook hear gunfire. When Matt and Jim land their canoe on the river bank, Bob comes to their defense. In the ensuing gun battle, Bob is shot in the leg, Matt mortally wounded and Jim taken hostage by the outlaws. With his dying breath, Matt tells Bob that Jim took part in the holdup only because Dawson had defrauded him. Unable to aid Jim because of his injured leg, Bob sends Chinook in his place. After Chinook unties Jim's hands, they both jump into a canoe and paddle downstream to Bob, who then tells Jim about his father's demise. Bob and Jim start the long trek back to Lebeck, but when Bob collapses, Jim proceeds alone to town for help. At the saloon owned by LaRue, Jim relates his plight, and Marie, LaRue's pretty daughter, volunteers that she has studied nursing in school and offers to treat Bob's wounds. Marie, LaRue and their faithful Indian companion Poleon then take Bob to their house to recuperate. Two weeks pass, and as Bob regains the use of his leg, Jim and Marie find themselves falling in love. ... +


In the Candian Northwest, outlaws Muskeg Joe, Buck and Rand, and miner Matt Blaine rob the Lebeck bank of $150,000. Matt's son Jim reluctantly takes part in the robbery because Dawson, the owner of the bank, has defrauded Matt of his mining claim. Later, at the Blaine cabin, Muskeg pulls out his gun and demands the money, but Jim and Matt overpower Muskeg and his men and escape in their canoe, the outlaws in hot pursuit. Down river, Mountie Bob McDonald, dressed in civilian clothes, and his dog Chinook hear gunfire. When Matt and Jim land their canoe on the river bank, Bob comes to their defense. In the ensuing gun battle, Bob is shot in the leg, Matt mortally wounded and Jim taken hostage by the outlaws. With his dying breath, Matt tells Bob that Jim took part in the holdup only because Dawson had defrauded him. Unable to aid Jim because of his injured leg, Bob sends Chinook in his place. After Chinook unties Jim's hands, they both jump into a canoe and paddle downstream to Bob, who then tells Jim about his father's demise. Bob and Jim start the long trek back to Lebeck, but when Bob collapses, Jim proceeds alone to town for help. At the saloon owned by LaRue, Jim relates his plight, and Marie, LaRue's pretty daughter, volunteers that she has studied nursing in school and offers to treat Bob's wounds. Marie, LaRue and their faithful Indian companion Poleon then take Bob to their house to recuperate. Two weeks pass, and as Bob regains the use of his leg, Jim and Marie find themselves falling in love. One day, Dawson comes to visit, and when he berates Poleon and roughly pushes him, Chinook attacks the banker. Dawson angrily warns the LaRues about giving refuge to strangers, and after he leaves, LaRue confides that he is at the banker's mercy because he lost his life savings in the robbery and is unable to pay his debts. Feeling responsible for the LaRues' troubles, Jim offers to return the money, which prompts Bob to admit that he is a Mountie. Declaring that he thinks that Dawson was in league with Muskeg to rob his own bank, Bob goes to town to investigate while Jim goes to retrieve the stolen money. Meanwhile, in town, Dawson convenes a meeting of the bank's stockholders and proposes that they liquidate their stock to repay the depositors. Afterward, Muskeg visits Dawson and informs him that Jim escaped with a stranger and a white dog. Realizing that the two strangers at the LaRues' house must be Jim and his friend, Dawson sends Muskeg and the boys to search the premises for the money. Later that night, Bob and Jim return home and are alerted to the intruders' presence by Chinook. As Bob and Jim hold off the trespassers, Chinook runs to town to fetch Poleon and LaRue. After routing the outlaws, Jim confesses his true identity to the LaRues and hands over the money to Bob. Flashing his badge, Bob identifies himself as a Mountie and asks Jim's help in setting a trap for Dawson. After jailing Jim, Bob tells Dawson that he has arrested Jim and entrusted the money to the local constable. Dawson then orders Muskeg and his boys to eliminate Jim and recover the money. That night, as Muskeg and the gang break into the jail, they are greeted by Poleon and Bob. In the ensuing fight, a lamp is overturned, and the jail is soon engulfed in flames. As the town races to extinguish the fire, Bob captures Muskeg, who then confesses that Dawson plotted the entire bank robbery. At that moment, Dawson shoots him and flees. Hurling his knife into the banker's chest, Poleon brings Dawson to justice. Later, as Jim prepares to leave with Bob to stand trial, Bob assures Marie that Jim will be treated with leniency and will soon return to her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.