Trails End (1949)

55 mins | Western | 3 April 1949

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HISTORY

The Copyright Catalog lists the film's title as Trail's End . The viewed print was missing approximately eight ... More Less

The Copyright Catalog lists the film's title as Trail's End . The viewed print was missing approximately eight minutes. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 49
p. 12.
The Exhibitor
16 Mar 1949.
---
Variety
6 Jul 49
p. 9.
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 April 1949
Production Date:
mid January 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
3 April 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2274
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55
Length(in feet):
4,964
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After ranch hand Drake discovers gold quartz on boss's Joe Stuart's ranch, he takes it to crooked attorney Porter and suggests that Porter buy the ranch and split the proceeds from the gold fifty-fifty with Drake. Later, Porter welcomes Bill Cameron, his former client, home from prison and tells him that, after legal expenses, all he now owns is his rundown ranch. Porter also advises Bill to stay away from Laurie Stuart, Joe's daughter, as Joe does not approve of him. Johnny Mack, Joe's foreman, Alibi, a traveling salesman, and Laurie are present when Porter comes to the ranch claiming that he wants to buy it for a client, but Joe states that the ranch will never be sold during his lifetime. As Porter is leaving, Bill arrives and Joe warns him to stay away from his daughter. Later, Porter suggests to Drake that Laurie might sell the ranch upon her father's death, and sends for gunman Clem Kettering. At the Stuarts', meanwhile, Johnny tangles with Joe when he hits his daughter during a quarrel over her relationship with Bill, then quits. Later, Alibi sees Kettering kill Joe and plant Bill's spur as "evidence." Alibi is taken prisoner by Kettering, who plans to expand his involvement in Porter's dealings. After Johnny tells Laurie about her father's death, he goes to the sheriff's office, where Bill maintains under questioning that he did not kill Joe. After the sheriff tells Bill that he will be held for trial, Bill takes the sheriff's gun and escapes on horseback. However, Johnny catches him and convinces him to stand trial for Laurie's sake. Johnny discovers where Alibi's wagon has been hidden and tells ... +


After ranch hand Drake discovers gold quartz on boss's Joe Stuart's ranch, he takes it to crooked attorney Porter and suggests that Porter buy the ranch and split the proceeds from the gold fifty-fifty with Drake. Later, Porter welcomes Bill Cameron, his former client, home from prison and tells him that, after legal expenses, all he now owns is his rundown ranch. Porter also advises Bill to stay away from Laurie Stuart, Joe's daughter, as Joe does not approve of him. Johnny Mack, Joe's foreman, Alibi, a traveling salesman, and Laurie are present when Porter comes to the ranch claiming that he wants to buy it for a client, but Joe states that the ranch will never be sold during his lifetime. As Porter is leaving, Bill arrives and Joe warns him to stay away from his daughter. Later, Porter suggests to Drake that Laurie might sell the ranch upon her father's death, and sends for gunman Clem Kettering. At the Stuarts', meanwhile, Johnny tangles with Joe when he hits his daughter during a quarrel over her relationship with Bill, then quits. Later, Alibi sees Kettering kill Joe and plant Bill's spur as "evidence." Alibi is taken prisoner by Kettering, who plans to expand his involvement in Porter's dealings. After Johnny tells Laurie about her father's death, he goes to the sheriff's office, where Bill maintains under questioning that he did not kill Joe. After the sheriff tells Bill that he will be held for trial, Bill takes the sheriff's gun and escapes on horseback. However, Johnny catches him and convinces him to stand trial for Laurie's sake. Johnny discovers where Alibi's wagon has been hidden and tells the sheriff that he feels Alibi's disappearance is related in some way to Joe's murder. With Bill's trial only two days away, Johnny becomes suspicious when he spots Drake leaving Porter's office, and follows him to where Alibi is being held. Johnny drives off the gang's horses, then rescues Alibi and sends him to Laurie's ranch. Back in town, Johnny tells the sheriff that Alibi's testimony will exonerate Bill. Johnny then goes to see Porter, but Kettering is in the next room and after overhearing Johnny tell Porter that Alibi is at the ranch, sends Drake to kill Alibi. Johnny pretends to leave the office and overhears Porter and Kettering discussing their plans. When Porter draws a gun, Johnny shoots him, then gets involved in a fistfight with Kettering, whom he beats and hands over to the sheriff. Johnny races to the ranch in time to prevent Drake from shooting Alibi. Later, Laurie and Bill reunite as Johnny and Alibi wander on. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.