Blues Busters (1950)

64-65 or 67 mins | Comedy | 29 October 1950

Director:

William Beaudine

Cinematographer:

Marcel Le Picard

Editor:

William Austin

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Bowery Thrush . In the opening credits, Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys are listed above the title. According to a 3 Jul 1950 HR news item, singer Bob Carroll was the singing double for Huntz Hall, but reviews credit John Lorenz as his singing double. Carroll's participation in the final film has not been confirmed. For more information on "The Bowery Boys" series, consult the Series Index and see the entry below for Live Wires ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Bowery Thrush . In the opening credits, Leo Gorcey and the Bowery Boys are listed above the title. According to a 3 Jul 1950 HR news item, singer Bob Carroll was the singing double for Huntz Hall, but reviews credit John Lorenz as his singing double. Carroll's participation in the final film has not been confirmed. For more information on "The Bowery Boys" series, consult the Series Index and see the entry below for Live Wires . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Oct 1950.
---
Daily Variety
23 Oct 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
31 Oct 50
p. 12.
Harrison's Reports
28 Oct 50
pp. 170-71.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1950
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 50
p. 3.
Independent Film Journal
18 nov 1950.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 Dec 50
p. 644.
The Exhibitor
8 Nov 50
p. 2962.
Variety
25 Oct 50
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jan Grippo Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Set cont
STAND INS
Singing double for Huntz Hall
Singing double for Adele Jergens
SOURCES
SONGS
"Wasn't It You" and "You Walk By," words and music by Ben Raleigh and Bernie Wayne
"Bluebirds Keep Singin' in the Rain," words and music by Johnny Lange and Eliot Daniel
"Let's Have a Heart to Heart Talk," words and music by Billy Austin, Eddie Brandt and Paul Sanders
+
SONGS
"Wasn't It You" and "You Walk By," words and music by Ben Raleigh and Bernie Wayne
"Bluebirds Keep Singin' in the Rain," words and music by Johnny Lange and Eliot Daniel
"Let's Have a Heart to Heart Talk," words and music by Billy Austin, Eddie Brandt and Paul Sanders
"Better Be Looking Out for Love," words and music by Ralph Wolf and Johnny Lange
"Joshua Fit de Battle of Jericho," traditional spiritual
"Dixie," words and music attributed to Daniel Decatur Emmett.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
The Bowery Thrush
Release Date:
29 October 1950
Production Date:
early August--mid August 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
29 October 1950
Copyright Number:
LP668
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64-65 or 67
Length(in feet):
6,068
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a New York hospital waiting room, Slip Mahoney, Whitey, Chuck, Butch and Louie Dumbrowski anxiously wait for news of their friend, Horace Debussy "Sach" Jones. When they are finally admitted to his room, they learn that despite his melodramatic talk of having been at death's door, Sach has merely had his tonsils removed. Later, at Louie's sweet shop, Louie gripes about having paid Sach's medical bills, and Slip promises to repay him. While Slip and the boys are discussing ways to raise some money without actually resorting to work, a melodious singing voice is heard from across the room, and everyone is stunned to discover that it is emanating from Sach. Slip concludes that the operation has altered Sach's voice and immediately begins to plan his friend's singing career. He takes Sach across the street to Rick Martin's elegant Rio Cabana nightclub, where Rick's girl friend, Lola Stanton, sings, but Rick throws them out. Undeterred, Slip tells their friend, music promoter Gabe Moreno, about Sach's new talent, and the whole gang heads to the local music store, where Slip's girl friend, Sally Dolan, works. A crowd assembles as Sach sings, and Slip and Gabe convince Louie to convert his sweet shop to a nightclub. When Louie's Bowery Palace opens, Sach, now known as the "Bowery Thrush," is a huge success, and Rick's club gradually loses all its business. Rick and Lola take in Louie's midnight show, which includes a tap dancing number by Sally, and when Slip rejects his offer to hire Sach, Rick resolves to defeat his competition through less honest means. He sends three thugs over to Louie's ... +


In a New York hospital waiting room, Slip Mahoney, Whitey, Chuck, Butch and Louie Dumbrowski anxiously wait for news of their friend, Horace Debussy "Sach" Jones. When they are finally admitted to his room, they learn that despite his melodramatic talk of having been at death's door, Sach has merely had his tonsils removed. Later, at Louie's sweet shop, Louie gripes about having paid Sach's medical bills, and Slip promises to repay him. While Slip and the boys are discussing ways to raise some money without actually resorting to work, a melodious singing voice is heard from across the room, and everyone is stunned to discover that it is emanating from Sach. Slip concludes that the operation has altered Sach's voice and immediately begins to plan his friend's singing career. He takes Sach across the street to Rick Martin's elegant Rio Cabana nightclub, where Rick's girl friend, Lola Stanton, sings, but Rick throws them out. Undeterred, Slip tells their friend, music promoter Gabe Moreno, about Sach's new talent, and the whole gang heads to the local music store, where Slip's girl friend, Sally Dolan, works. A crowd assembles as Sach sings, and Slip and Gabe convince Louie to convert his sweet shop to a nightclub. When Louie's Bowery Palace opens, Sach, now known as the "Bowery Thrush," is a huge success, and Rick's club gradually loses all its business. Rick and Lola take in Louie's midnight show, which includes a tap dancing number by Sally, and when Slip rejects his offer to hire Sach, Rick resolves to defeat his competition through less honest means. He sends three thugs over to Louie's to disrupt the show, but when they are trounced by Sach's devoted female fans, Rick decides to play his trump card. The next day, Lola rescues Sach from a horde of over-eager young fans and persuades him to come home with her and autograph her lamp shade. Hours later, Sach has written his name on everything in Lola's apartment, including a paper that turns out to be a contract to sing at Rick's club. Rick shows up the next day to claim his new star, and following a disastrous night, in which Slip and the boys attempt to entertain their few remaining customers, the Bowery Palace closes. Sach is lonely and miserable in his new job, and even having Slip swat him with his hat for old times' sake fails to cheer him up. Meanwhile, Rick visits Sally at the music store and offers her a job, but she turns him down. Later, however, she shows up at his apartment, having left an anonymous note telling Lola to come to Rick's apartment for a surprise. After Lola walks in and finds Rick kissing Sally, she angrily goes to see Slip and helps him get Sach back by pointing out that the contract is made out to her. Louie's club reopens, but as Sach approaches the microphone, he finds that his mellow singing voice has disappeared. Slip and Gabe hustle Sach off stage, and Sach reveals that his family doctor performed a procedure to get rid of a tickle in his throat. Slip takes off his hat and proceeds to give Sach the swatting of his life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.