Call of the Forest (1949)

57 mins | Western | 18 November 1949

Director:

John F. Link

Writer:

Craig Burns

Producer:

Edward F. Finney

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Asa Boyd Clark

Production Company:

Adventure Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Untamed and The Flaming Forest . Although the onscreen credits "introduce" actor Charlie Hughes, the second film he made, the 1948 Monogram production The Fighting Ranger , was actually released before Call of the Forest (see below). Adventure Pictures was not credited onscreen as the film's production company, but was listed as such in Oct 1947 HR production charts and in a 15 Apr 1949 HR news item. On 27 May 1949, a HR news item noted that Lippert had acquired the picture and was planning to release it through Screen Guild after several additional days of filming were ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Untamed and The Flaming Forest . Although the onscreen credits "introduce" actor Charlie Hughes, the second film he made, the 1948 Monogram production The Fighting Ranger , was actually released before Call of the Forest (see below). Adventure Pictures was not credited onscreen as the film's production company, but was listed as such in Oct 1947 HR production charts and in a 15 Apr 1949 HR news item. On 27 May 1949, a HR news item noted that Lippert had acquired the picture and was planning to release it through Screen Guild after several additional days of filming were completed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 47
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 47
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 49
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Apr 50
p. 278.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Still photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Master of props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Untamed
The Flaming Forest
Release Date:
18 November 1949
Production Date:
began late September 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 December 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2721
Physical Properties:
Sound
Glen Glenn Sound Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
57
Length(in feet):
5,117
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12871
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Rancher Bob Brand persuades fellow rancher Sam Harrison to help him capture a wild black stallion to give to his seven-year-old son Bobby when he arrives from the East. Together they isolate the stallion, who is the leader of a large herd, lasso him and lock him inside Bob's corral. Bob then leaves to pick up Bobby at the train station, unaware that his scheming neighbors, one of whom is Harrison, suspect that he has discovered Lost Mine, which is located in the badlands near the home of a seemingly crazy old Indian named Stormcloud. After Bob delivers Bobby to the ranch, he presents him with the stallion and tells him that he named the horse King because he was the king of his herd. Bobby notices that King has a splinter stuck in his foot and removes it, after which King appears relieved. In the badlands, meanwhile, Harrison and Gillman are searching for the mine, when suddenly, Stormcloud begins shooting at them. Bob tells Bobby that he plans to leave for a few days to search for the fabled mine and asks Bobby to look after the ranch while he is gone. Days later, King escapes from the corral and gallops into the wilderness some distance away from the ranch. When Bobby finds King, he realizes that he has injured his leg and is unable to stand. Unwilling to desert King, Bobby lies down on the ground next to him, where he stays throughout the night. The next morning, King and Bobby are awakened by Stormcloud, and King appears to have recovered. When Bobby tells him about his father's plan to ... +


Rancher Bob Brand persuades fellow rancher Sam Harrison to help him capture a wild black stallion to give to his seven-year-old son Bobby when he arrives from the East. Together they isolate the stallion, who is the leader of a large herd, lasso him and lock him inside Bob's corral. Bob then leaves to pick up Bobby at the train station, unaware that his scheming neighbors, one of whom is Harrison, suspect that he has discovered Lost Mine, which is located in the badlands near the home of a seemingly crazy old Indian named Stormcloud. After Bob delivers Bobby to the ranch, he presents him with the stallion and tells him that he named the horse King because he was the king of his herd. Bobby notices that King has a splinter stuck in his foot and removes it, after which King appears relieved. In the badlands, meanwhile, Harrison and Gillman are searching for the mine, when suddenly, Stormcloud begins shooting at them. Bob tells Bobby that he plans to leave for a few days to search for the fabled mine and asks Bobby to look after the ranch while he is gone. Days later, King escapes from the corral and gallops into the wilderness some distance away from the ranch. When Bobby finds King, he realizes that he has injured his leg and is unable to stand. Unwilling to desert King, Bobby lies down on the ground next to him, where he stays throughout the night. The next morning, King and Bobby are awakened by Stormcloud, and King appears to have recovered. When Bobby tells him about his father's plan to find the mine, Stormcloud says that he would like to repay Bob, because he has done much to help his people. Stormcloud then recounts a legend which tells how many generations before, his tribe attacked a group of white gold prospectors. Now, Stormcloud explains, the tribe has come to regret the attack. Stormcloud then gives Bobby a Bible which was stolen from one of the prospectors. Bobby goes to the ranch and gives the bible to Bob, who discovers a map to the mine that Stormcloud drew inside the back cover. When Harrison learns about the map, he goes to the ranch, shoots Bob and steals the Bible. The fatally injured Bob falls to the ground, knocks over a lantern and starts a fire, which soon engulfs the entire house. After Bobby escapes the burning house, the sheriff organizes a search party, which includes Harrison. The following day, King awakens Bobby, who fled into a nearby field. Bobby urges his beloved stallion to rejoin his herd, and the horse reluctantly departs. Harrison then arrives, and after Stormcloud accuses him of killing Bob, he shoots Stormcloud in the arm and begins firing at Bobby. Meanwhile, King leads the herd in a stampede toward Harrison, who is trampled to death. Bobby then sees the Bible lying on the ground next to Harrison's corpse, grabs it and rides away on King. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.