Davy Crockett, Indian Scout (1950)

71 mins | Western | 6 January 1950

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HISTORY

The television release title of this film was Indian Scout . A modern source notes that the film contains footage from United Artists' 1940 release Kit Carson (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2313).
       Born in 1786 in Tennessee, American frontiersman and politician Davy Crockett distinguished himself in Andrew Jackson's campaign against the Creek Indians. In 1821, Crockett was elected to the Tennessee state legislature, and in 1827, to Congress. He died in 1836 fighting for Texas at the Alamo. His character was featured in several films, beginning in 1908 with Davy Crockett in Hearts Divided . Subsequent pictures include Paramount's Davy Crockett , released in 1916, and Sunset's Davy Crockett at the Fall of the Alamo , released in 1926. The Walt Disney Studio produced two pictures dealing with Crockett's character, Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier , released in 1955, and Davy Crockett and the River Pirates , released in 1956. Several television productions featuring the character were broadcast during the ... More Less

The television release title of this film was Indian Scout . A modern source notes that the film contains footage from United Artists' 1940 release Kit Carson (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2313).
       Born in 1786 in Tennessee, American frontiersman and politician Davy Crockett distinguished himself in Andrew Jackson's campaign against the Creek Indians. In 1821, Crockett was elected to the Tennessee state legislature, and in 1827, to Congress. He died in 1836 fighting for Texas at the Alamo. His character was featured in several films, beginning in 1908 with Davy Crockett in Hearts Divided . Subsequent pictures include Paramount's Davy Crockett , released in 1916, and Sunset's Davy Crockett at the Fall of the Alamo , released in 1926. The Walt Disney Studio produced two pictures dealing with Crockett's character, Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier , released in 1955, and Davy Crockett and the River Pirates , released in 1956. Several television productions featuring the character were broadcast during the 1950s. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jan 1950.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jan 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Jan 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 50
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Jan 50
p. 153.
New York Times
17 Mar 50
p. 28.
Variety
11 Jan 50
p. 6.
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 January 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Reliance Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 January 1950
Copyright Number:
LP2745
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71
Length(in feet):
6,399
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13354
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1848, after an Army platoon escorting a wagon train of homesteaders to a fort is attacked, Col. Pollard holds an informal hearing in his office. When Pollard reveals his suspicion that a spy has been operating in their midst, an angry homesteader named Mr. Simms accuses Red Hawk, an Indian guide, of being the spy. This prompts Red Hawk's partner, an Army scout named Davy Crockett, who shares his famous uncle's name, to give the following testimony: During the long journey to the fort, Davy and Red Hawk learn about the threat of a local Indian uprising. After they rescue a lone wagon from some braves, Davy and Red Hawk meet passenger Frances Oatman, who is part Kiowa Indian. Frances says that she hired her supposedly deaf-mute driver, Ben, for the journey west in search of a teaching job, and Davy encourages her to join the wagon train. One night, at the homesteaders' camp, Red Hawk learns that an attack is imminent, so he and Davy inform Capt. Weightman. Just then, a messenger arrives with news that braves from other tribes are gathering in preparation for battle. Inside his tent at the camp, Weightman is assured by the spy, an Indian chief named Lone Eagle who is posing as Weightman's trusted Indian agent, that a general uprising is unlikely. Suspicious of Frances, Red Hawk sneaks into her wagon and learns that she attended a missionary school for Indians. Later, Davy overhears Ben speaking to an Indian stable hand and realizes that Frances lied about him. The next morning, Davy, Red Hawk and the cavalry ride out with the wagon train, followed by ... +


In 1848, after an Army platoon escorting a wagon train of homesteaders to a fort is attacked, Col. Pollard holds an informal hearing in his office. When Pollard reveals his suspicion that a spy has been operating in their midst, an angry homesteader named Mr. Simms accuses Red Hawk, an Indian guide, of being the spy. This prompts Red Hawk's partner, an Army scout named Davy Crockett, who shares his famous uncle's name, to give the following testimony: During the long journey to the fort, Davy and Red Hawk learn about the threat of a local Indian uprising. After they rescue a lone wagon from some braves, Davy and Red Hawk meet passenger Frances Oatman, who is part Kiowa Indian. Frances says that she hired her supposedly deaf-mute driver, Ben, for the journey west in search of a teaching job, and Davy encourages her to join the wagon train. One night, at the homesteaders' camp, Red Hawk learns that an attack is imminent, so he and Davy inform Capt. Weightman. Just then, a messenger arrives with news that braves from other tribes are gathering in preparation for battle. Inside his tent at the camp, Weightman is assured by the spy, an Indian chief named Lone Eagle who is posing as Weightman's trusted Indian agent, that a general uprising is unlikely. Suspicious of Frances, Red Hawk sneaks into her wagon and learns that she attended a missionary school for Indians. Later, Davy overhears Ben speaking to an Indian stable hand and realizes that Frances lied about him. The next morning, Davy, Red Hawk and the cavalry ride out with the wagon train, followed by Lone Eagle and the Indian stable hand. Davy, who has purposely left their route undecided, refuses to say which of two mountain passes they will take. When the road forks, Davy picks the dry South Pass, knowing that the camp will be warned that there will be no water for the next leg of the journey. Davy then instructs Red Hawk to follow anyone who leaves the camp. Once everyone is asleep, Davy captures Ben trying to sneak away and learns that he is spying for Lone Eagle. Meanwhile, Red Hawk follows Frances when she tries to slip away from the camp to warn her father, Lone Eagle. The next morning, Lone Eagle sends braves from several tribes to ambush the wagon train at South Pass. When Frances overhears her father vowing to kill women and children, she decides to return to warn Davy and Red Hawk of the attack, but they refuse to believe her until a messenger arrives with the same warning. Later, while returning with news of the altered route, a messenger is shot, and the message intercepted. Lone Eagle then quickly moves his braves to the new location. Marching well ahead of the homesteaders, the cavalry enters the pass, and the Indians use explosives to cause an avalanche, which cuts off the cavalry from the homesteaders. In order to get back to where the homesteaders are being attacked by braves, Davy uses a wagon full of explosives to blast a hole through the side of the avalanche. After they are rescued, the homesteaders are escorted safely to the fort, where Pollard decides to dismiss the charges against Frances and hire her as the fort's teacher. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.