Feudin' Rhythm (1949)

65 mins | Western | December 1949

Director:

Edward Bernds

Writer:

Barry Shipman

Producer:

Colbert Clark

Cinematographer:

Fayte Browne

Editor:

Paul Borofsky

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Crew credits, missing from the viewed print, were taken from copyright material and contemporary ... More Less

Crew credits, missing from the viewed print, were taken from copyright material and contemporary reviews. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Nov 1949.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 1949.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Dec 1949.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cattle Call" music and lyrics by Tex Owens
"She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain," traditional, special lyrics by Guy Willis
"Put Your Shoes On, Lucy," music and lyrics by Hank Fort
+
SONGS
"Cattle Call" music and lyrics by Tex Owens
"She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain," traditional, special lyrics by Guy Willis
"Put Your Shoes On, Lucy," music and lyrics by Hank Fort
"You Know How Talk Gets Around," music and lyrics by Fred Rose
"There's No Wings on My Angel," music and lyrics by Cy Coben, Irving Melsher and Eddy Arnold
"That Ain't in Any Catalog," music and lyrics by Kay Evans and Fred Stryker
"Nearest Thing to Heaven," music by Al Jolson, lyrics by Bené Russell.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1949
Production Date:
6 July--16 July 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
14 December 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2680
Duration(in mins):
65
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14060
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Horseshoe tries to call in a warehouse fire to his employer, Ace Lucky, during a broadcast of his country and western radio show, obnoxious young Bobby Upperworth hangs up the telephone. Meanwhile, Lucky informs snooty Lucile Upperworth, Bobby's aunt, that he no longer needs her sponsorship for his new television program because he has been able to buy the necessary equipment with loans from the cast, who all dislike her. When Horseshoe finally reaches Lucky with the news that all his new equipment has burned in the fire, however, Lucky is forced to ask Lucile for help. Lucile agrees to buy new equipment on the condition that she will be the writer, producer, director and star of the program. Later, Lucile arrives at Lucky's ranch accompanied by Bobby and several performers who are to take part in the more "cultured" program she plans to present. Horrified by the changes Lucile wants to institute, Lucky's performers plot to get rid of her without losing the money that they need. Unknown to Lucky, Eddy Arnold, his star performer, is Bobby's father, but after his wife died, he was coerced by Lucile, her sister, into promising that he would never try to see his son again. Lucile, who told Bobby that his father was dead, now orders Lucky to drop Eddy from the show. Lucky refuses but becomes even more desperate to get rid of his nemesis, especially when he learns that Mr. Rushman, the network representative, hates the play, which is set in ancient Greece, that Lucile has written. Horseshoe suggests that they fake a bandit attack to scare Lucile away, but Bobby ... +


When Horseshoe tries to call in a warehouse fire to his employer, Ace Lucky, during a broadcast of his country and western radio show, obnoxious young Bobby Upperworth hangs up the telephone. Meanwhile, Lucky informs snooty Lucile Upperworth, Bobby's aunt, that he no longer needs her sponsorship for his new television program because he has been able to buy the necessary equipment with loans from the cast, who all dislike her. When Horseshoe finally reaches Lucky with the news that all his new equipment has burned in the fire, however, Lucky is forced to ask Lucile for help. Lucile agrees to buy new equipment on the condition that she will be the writer, producer, director and star of the program. Later, Lucile arrives at Lucky's ranch accompanied by Bobby and several performers who are to take part in the more "cultured" program she plans to present. Horrified by the changes Lucile wants to institute, Lucky's performers plot to get rid of her without losing the money that they need. Unknown to Lucky, Eddy Arnold, his star performer, is Bobby's father, but after his wife died, he was coerced by Lucile, her sister, into promising that he would never try to see his son again. Lucile, who told Bobby that his father was dead, now orders Lucky to drop Eddy from the show. Lucky refuses but becomes even more desperate to get rid of his nemesis, especially when he learns that Mr. Rushman, the network representative, hates the play, which is set in ancient Greece, that Lucile has written. Horseshoe suggests that they fake a bandit attack to scare Lucile away, but Bobby overhears the plot and rigs a series of booby traps to foil them. When one of the booby traps injures Eddy, a repentant Bobby apologizes to the singer, who then sings the boy a song he wrote for his son when he was a baby. Lucile sees them together and fires Eddy, but Lucky insists that he stay. Then Valerie Kay, Lucky's secretary, learns that Charles Chester Upperworth, Lucile's husband, is facing bankruptcy. Lucky tells Upperworth that if he can persuade Lucile to leave the program, the regular Ace Lucky show will be picked up by the network, and he will be able to return the money that he borrowed. Upperworth immediately agrees to help, and when Lucile, who is convinced that her program will be a great success, refuses to leave, he suggests that they abduct her. Lucile evades the kidnappers, however, and Lucky is forced to broadcast her "historical" play. In the meantime, Bobby, who has become very fond of Eddy, rigs more booby traps and the play comes off as a slapstick comedy. After the set collapses, Lucky orders the curtain dropped and the musicians perform their set. The show, with Eddy as star, is a big hit and the network agrees to pick it up. Later, a grateful Upperworth tells Bobby that Eddy is his father, and the two are reunited. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.