Hoedown (1950)

63 mins | Comedy | 6 June 1950

Director:

Ray Nazarro

Writer:

Barry Shipman

Producer:

Colbert Clark

Cinematographer:

Fayte Browne

Editor:

Paul Borofsky

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Jul 1950.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jun 50
p. 6.
Film Daily
27 Jun 50
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Jun 50
p. 354.
Variety
21 Jun 50
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Gaffer
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
MUSIC
"De Camptown Races" and "Old Folks at Home," by Stephen Collins Foster
"Red River Valley" and "Polly Wolly Doodle," traditional.
SONGS
"Just a Little Lovin' (Will Go a Long Way)," words and music by Zeke Clements and Eddy Arnold
"I Betcha I Getcha," words and music by Frances Clark and Fred Stryker
"Oh Where, Oh Where, Has My Little Dog Gone?" words by Septimus Winner, music traditional
+
SONGS
"Just a Little Lovin' (Will Go a Long Way)," words and music by Zeke Clements and Eddy Arnold
"I Betcha I Getcha," words and music by Frances Clark and Fred Stryker
"Oh Where, Oh Where, Has My Little Dog Gone?" words by Septimus Winner, music traditional
"I'm Throwing Rice (At the Girl I Love)," words and music by Steve Nelson, Ed Nelson, Jr. and Eddy Arnold
"Bouquet of Roses," words and music by Steve Nelson and Bob Hilliard
"Can't Shake the Sands of Texas from My Shoes," words and music by Gene Autry and Diane Johnston
"Tennessee Saturday Night," words and music by Billy Hughes
"Frog Went a-Courtin'," traditional.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 June 1950
Production Date:
14 June--24 June 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
24 February 1950
Copyright Number:
LP2851
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63
Length(in feet):
5,675
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13965
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Reporter Vera Wright is assigned to write a "sob" story about failed cowboy movie star Stoney Rhodes, whose mother is on the verge of losing her home. After Stoney learns that his last public appearance has been canceled for lack of interest, Vera agrees to drive him to the bus station. Her car runs out of gas near a farm belonging to singer Eddy Arnold, and Vera asks Stoney to buy some gas from him. Stoney arrives in the middle of amateur tryouts for the big hospital benefit that Eddy is hosting. Instead of gas, the inarticulate Stoney buys a ticket for the show with the last of his money. He then tries to steal it back, but Eddy's farm foreman, Small Potatoes, thwarts his efforts. Stoney is finally rescued from Small Potatoes by the arrival of Vera, who has grown tired of waiting for him. When singer Carolina Cotton, who has taken a liking to Stoney, learns of his mother's plight, she suggests that he capture some wanted bank robbers for the reward. Then Eddy offers Stoney a job as a farmhand. Later, Eddy asks Vera to accompany him to a theater which is showing one of Stoney's movies. They discover that Stoney has a wonderful singing voice, and Eddy calls his agent Sam, who has been looking for a new cowboy singer. Back at the farm, a smitten Carolina has been doing Stoney's work for him, even after Stoney discloses that he has a crush on Vera. Meanwhile, the escaping bank robbers commandeer Sam's car and force him to drive them to the farm. After Sam and the men arrive, Stoney reveals that Gene Autry dubbed his ... +


Reporter Vera Wright is assigned to write a "sob" story about failed cowboy movie star Stoney Rhodes, whose mother is on the verge of losing her home. After Stoney learns that his last public appearance has been canceled for lack of interest, Vera agrees to drive him to the bus station. Her car runs out of gas near a farm belonging to singer Eddy Arnold, and Vera asks Stoney to buy some gas from him. Stoney arrives in the middle of amateur tryouts for the big hospital benefit that Eddy is hosting. Instead of gas, the inarticulate Stoney buys a ticket for the show with the last of his money. He then tries to steal it back, but Eddy's farm foreman, Small Potatoes, thwarts his efforts. Stoney is finally rescued from Small Potatoes by the arrival of Vera, who has grown tired of waiting for him. When singer Carolina Cotton, who has taken a liking to Stoney, learns of his mother's plight, she suggests that he capture some wanted bank robbers for the reward. Then Eddy offers Stoney a job as a farmhand. Later, Eddy asks Vera to accompany him to a theater which is showing one of Stoney's movies. They discover that Stoney has a wonderful singing voice, and Eddy calls his agent Sam, who has been looking for a new cowboy singer. Back at the farm, a smitten Carolina has been doing Stoney's work for him, even after Stoney discloses that he has a crush on Vera. Meanwhile, the escaping bank robbers commandeer Sam's car and force him to drive them to the farm. After Sam and the men arrive, Stoney reveals that Gene Autry dubbed his singing voice in the movie. Privately, Sam lets Eddy know that the other men are the escaped robbers. The robbers decide to steal the receipts from the benefit performance and, realizing that Stoney is the weakest of the men, send him to collect the money. In the meantime, Carolina gives Stoney his first kiss, and suddenly, he realizes that he loves Carolina, which makes him courageous. After a complicated battle, Stoney singlehandedly rounds up the robbers, and now that he is a hero, eight different movie studios offer him a contract. His money problems solved, Stoney embraces Carolina. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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