Never Fear (1950)

81-82 mins | Drama | January 1950

Director:

Ida Lupino

Producer:

Collier Young

Cinematographer:

Archie Stout

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

The Filmakers, Inc.
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HISTORY

A May 1950 news item in DV notes that the title of this film was changed to The Young Lovers following its opening run in several cities. Although a print of this film bearing the title They're Called Young Lovers has been located, it may have been a television release title. The following written prologue appears at the beginning of the film: "This is a true story. It was photographed where it happened. Our grateful thanks to the many who made this motion picture possible." A contemporary news item in LAEx notes that director/actress Ida Lupino was diagnosed with polio at age sixteen and was successfully treated for paralysis in her right hand. An undated NYT pre-production news item in the AMPAS clipping file announced Frank Cavett as the intended director of the picture.
       This film marked Lupino's first directorial credit, and the acting debut of Hugh O'Brian. A contemporary news item notes that Lupino was diagnosed with polio at age sixteen and was successfully treated for paralysis in her right hand. An Apr 1949 news item in DV indicated that Anson Bond was to be the associate producer of the film, and that Leo Penn was set for a starring role. Bond and Penn were involved in Lupino's previous co-production with her then husband, Collier Young, Not Wanted (see below), but they did not participate in this film. Contemporary news items note that the name of Young and Lupino's production company, Emerald Productions, was changed to The Filmakers during the making of the picture.
       According to ... More Less

A May 1950 news item in DV notes that the title of this film was changed to The Young Lovers following its opening run in several cities. Although a print of this film bearing the title They're Called Young Lovers has been located, it may have been a television release title. The following written prologue appears at the beginning of the film: "This is a true story. It was photographed where it happened. Our grateful thanks to the many who made this motion picture possible." A contemporary news item in LAEx notes that director/actress Ida Lupino was diagnosed with polio at age sixteen and was successfully treated for paralysis in her right hand. An undated NYT pre-production news item in the AMPAS clipping file announced Frank Cavett as the intended director of the picture.
       This film marked Lupino's first directorial credit, and the acting debut of Hugh O'Brian. A contemporary news item notes that Lupino was diagnosed with polio at age sixteen and was successfully treated for paralysis in her right hand. An Apr 1949 news item in DV indicated that Anson Bond was to be the associate producer of the film, and that Leo Penn was set for a starring role. Bond and Penn were involved in Lupino's previous co-production with her then husband, Collier Young, Not Wanted (see below), but they did not participate in this film. Contemporary news items note that the name of Young and Lupino's production company, Emerald Productions, was changed to The Filmakers during the making of the picture.
       According to an Apr 1950 NYT news item, Lupino and Collier did not seek funding from the major studios, and instead used their own and their friends' money to make the film and cast Lupino's sister Rita in the film. Howard Hughes, after previewing the film, was said to have been so impressed with what Lupino and Collier accomplished on a $151,000 budget that he gave them a nine-month contract to join RKO as an independent producing unit. On 31 May 1949, HR noted that the film would be produced for Film Classics release, but subsequently reported on 19 Sep 1949 that it had been withdrawn from release by that company. According to a HR news item dated 25 Apr 1949, the film was to be shot at California Studio, although the same publication notes on 30 Aug 1949 that the film was to be shot entirely on location. Never Fear was shot at least in part on location at the Kabat Kaiser Institute in Santa Monica, CA, and marked the screen debut of actor Hugh O'Brian. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jan 1950.
---
Daily Variety
25 Apr 1949.
---
Daily Variety
4 Jan 50
p. 4.
Daily Variety
1 May 1940.
---
Film Daily
12 Jan 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 49
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 49
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 49
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 49
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 49
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 50
p. 4, 13
Los Angeles Examiner
26 Apr 1949.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Jan 50
p. 154.
New York Times
30 Apr 1950.
---
Variety
4 Jan 50
p. 63.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Ida Lupino Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Wrt for the screen by, Wrt for the scr by
Wrt for the screen by, Wrt for the scr by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dir
COSTUMES
Women's ward des
Women's ward des
Men's ward
MUSIC
SOUND
DANCE
Dance des and staged by
Square dance arr and called by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Why Pretend," music and lyrics by John Franco
"Guaymas," music and lyrics by John Franco and William Earley.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Theyre Called Young Lovers
The Young Lovers
Release Date:
January 1950
Production Date:
mid September--early October 1949
Copyright Claimant:
The Filmakers
Copyright Date:
29 December 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2860
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
81-82
Length(in feet):
7,301
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14244
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Seemingly destined for success, dancer Carol Williams and her partner Guy Richards celebrate the end of a fine performance at Club 18 and dream of the fame and fortune to come. Their dreams are suddenly shattered, however, when Carol suffers from blurred vision and is diagnosed with Poliomyelitis by Dr. Hugh Taylor. Carol despairs and believes that she will never walk or dance again. Scheduled for months of physical therapy under the care of doctors at the Kabat Kaiser Institute, Carol is told that she will be able to walk again only if she maintains the will to do so. Meanwhile, Guy, desperate for work now that he has no dance partner, takes a job as a realtor. At a hospital picnic, Carol begins to show signs of progress and joins her new friend Len Randall, a wheelchair-bound patient who has provided her with inspiration, in a square dance. Carol is in love with Len, and when Guy shows up at the hospital with an engagement ring for her, she refuses it and tells Guy that selling houses is no life for him. Carol says she will not allow Guy to become her "nursemaid," but he insists that he still loves her and will do anything to keep her. Unable to understand her change of heart, Guy asks Carol what is troubling her, and she shouts back, angrily, "I'm a cripple, Guy, that's what's the matter with me!" Guy is determined to win Carol back, and when they take a drive to talk matters over, he turns to Carol and pleads with her to "be a woman" for him. She rejects ... +


Seemingly destined for success, dancer Carol Williams and her partner Guy Richards celebrate the end of a fine performance at Club 18 and dream of the fame and fortune to come. Their dreams are suddenly shattered, however, when Carol suffers from blurred vision and is diagnosed with Poliomyelitis by Dr. Hugh Taylor. Carol despairs and believes that she will never walk or dance again. Scheduled for months of physical therapy under the care of doctors at the Kabat Kaiser Institute, Carol is told that she will be able to walk again only if she maintains the will to do so. Meanwhile, Guy, desperate for work now that he has no dance partner, takes a job as a realtor. At a hospital picnic, Carol begins to show signs of progress and joins her new friend Len Randall, a wheelchair-bound patient who has provided her with inspiration, in a square dance. Carol is in love with Len, and when Guy shows up at the hospital with an engagement ring for her, she refuses it and tells Guy that selling houses is no life for him. Carol says she will not allow Guy to become her "nursemaid," but he insists that he still loves her and will do anything to keep her. Unable to understand her change of heart, Guy asks Carol what is troubling her, and she shouts back, angrily, "I'm a cripple, Guy, that's what's the matter with me!" Guy is determined to win Carol back, and when they take a drive to talk matters over, he turns to Carol and pleads with her to "be a woman" for him. She rejects his advances and asks him to find another woman to take care of his needs. Guy eventually gives up hope that he and Carol will ever be reunited and begins a romance with his secretary. On her twenty-first birthday, Carol, now able to take her first steps, is visited by Guy, who tells her that he has taken her advice and quit the real estate business and found another dance partner. Carol is hurt by the news but hides her pain from Guy. Len comforts Carol when she becomes hysterical and screams out her frustration, but he, too, hurts her when he tells her that he will be going back to his wife when he is released. On the day of her release from the Kabat Kaiser Institute, Carol has difficulty walking down the street alone, and is jealous of those who are able to walk freely. As she limps along, Guy shows up unexpectedly and they embrace in a kiss. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Medical


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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