North of the Great Divide (1950)

67 mins | Western | 15 November 1950

Director:

William Witney

Writer:

Eric Taylor

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Tony Martinelli

Production Designer:

Frank Hotaling

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Song of the Bandit ... More Less

The working title of the film was Song of the Bandit . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Nov 1950.
---
Daily Variety
15 Nov 50
p. 5.
Film Daily
21 Nov 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 50
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 1950
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 50
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 50
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Dec 50
p. 598.
Variety
22 Nov 50
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"By the Laughing Spring," "Just Keep a' Movin'" and "North of the Great Divide," music and lyrics by Jack Elliott.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Song of the Bandit
Release Date:
15 November 1950
Production Date:
late April--20 May 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 December 1950
Copyright Number:
LP562
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Trucolor
Duration(in mins):
67
Length(in feet):
5,995
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14650
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Near the Canadian-American border, Indian agent Roy Rogers joins the Oseka Indians in celebrating the return of the salmon to spawn. As part of the festivities, Roy competes against several Royal Canadian Mounted Policemen in the tribe's annual horseback race. Later, a fish cannery owner named Banning, and his foreman, Stagg, visit Oseka Chief Nogura to explain their plans to build a new cannery on the river. Nogura tries to reason with them, saying that his people have barely enough to eat as it is, without the added competition of another cannery. Later, a field nurse named Ann Keith tells Roy that the entire Oseka tribe is in danger of starving if their situation does not improve. When Roy meets with American government official Henry Gates, he learns that the government is considering forcing the tribe onto a reservation. Later, Nogura's son Dacona jumps onto the back of Banning's cannery wagon and begins knocking crates off onto the road. Stagg then grabs Dacona, ties him to the back of the wagon and drags him. When Roy witnesses this, he jumps aboard and begins punching Stagg in the face. Later, Banning agrees to let more fish reach the Indians if they, in turn, will promise to quit sabotaging the cannery. Later, Nogura tells Roy that his fishermen found a dead Mountie in the river some time ago. A mark on his neck seemed to indicate that the Mountie had been strangled before being dumped into the river. As he was running from the river, Nogura explains, he dropped his rifle and now fears being accused of the crime. Soon, ... +


Near the Canadian-American border, Indian agent Roy Rogers joins the Oseka Indians in celebrating the return of the salmon to spawn. As part of the festivities, Roy competes against several Royal Canadian Mounted Policemen in the tribe's annual horseback race. Later, a fish cannery owner named Banning, and his foreman, Stagg, visit Oseka Chief Nogura to explain their plans to build a new cannery on the river. Nogura tries to reason with them, saying that his people have barely enough to eat as it is, without the added competition of another cannery. Later, a field nurse named Ann Keith tells Roy that the entire Oseka tribe is in danger of starving if their situation does not improve. When Roy meets with American government official Henry Gates, he learns that the government is considering forcing the tribe onto a reservation. Later, Nogura's son Dacona jumps onto the back of Banning's cannery wagon and begins knocking crates off onto the road. Stagg then grabs Dacona, ties him to the back of the wagon and drags him. When Roy witnesses this, he jumps aboard and begins punching Stagg in the face. Later, Banning agrees to let more fish reach the Indians if they, in turn, will promise to quit sabotaging the cannery. Later, Nogura tells Roy that his fishermen found a dead Mountie in the river some time ago. A mark on his neck seemed to indicate that the Mountie had been strangled before being dumped into the river. As he was running from the river, Nogura explains, he dropped his rifle and now fears being accused of the crime. Soon, Mounties arrive to search the Indian village for Nogura, while the real culprit, Stagg, who had killed the Mountie while trying to burn down the competing Canadian cannery, is free from suspicion. Later, when Deputy Bill Hartley captures Nogura, he is turned over to Roy's custody. On Roy's urging, Nogura returns to his village, where he is promptly arrested by Sheriff Bradley. When Roy meets Mountie Sgt. Douglas, he urges him to work toward a salmon fishing agreement which all parties must honor. While the Indian braves clamor for war, Roy goes to the jail to visit Nogura and realizes that he has been kidnapped. Guessing that Banning is responsible, Roy and his friend Splinters break into his office. After the gang arrives and Roy rescues Nogura, he determines that the mark left on Nogura's neck by Stagg's whip is identical to the one found on the dead Mountie. When Roy learns that the gang has set several burning rafts drifting toward the Canadian cannery, he rushes to extinguish the flames. Roy then captures Stagg, using his own whip to lasso him from his horse. After Roy delivers Stagg and Banning to the Mounties, the Indians once again celebrate the river's teeming salmon population. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.