Right Cross (1950)

89-90 mins | Drama | 6 October 1950

Director:

John Sturges

Writer:

Charles Schnee

Producer:

Armand Deutsch

Cinematographer:

Norbert Brodine

Editor:

James E. Newcom

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Gabriel Scognamillo

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

A Mar 1949 HR news item indicates that actress Gloria De Haven was originally cast in the role played by June Allyson. A Nov 1949 DV news item adds that Ava Gardner was to play the feminine lead. Although a Feb 1950 DV news item lists Polly Bailey in the cast, her participation in the released film has not been confirmed. Marilyn Monroe appears in the film briefly as a model named "Dusky La ... More Less

A Mar 1949 HR news item indicates that actress Gloria De Haven was originally cast in the role played by June Allyson. A Nov 1949 DV news item adds that Ava Gardner was to play the feminine lead. Although a Feb 1950 DV news item lists Polly Bailey in the cast, her participation in the released film has not been confirmed. Marilyn Monroe appears in the film briefly as a model named "Dusky La Dieu." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
May 50
p. 161, 177.
Box Office
26 Aug 1950.
---
Daily Variety
8 Nov 49
p. 1.
Daily Variety
27 Jan 50
p. 11.
Daily Variety
1 Feb 50
p. 11.
Daily Variety
16 Aug 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Aug 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 49
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Aug 50
pp. 441-42.
New York Times
16 Nov 50
p. 39.
Variety
16 Aug 50
p. 11.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Gaffer
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Hair styles des by
Hairstylist
Makeup created by
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Grip
SOURCES
SONGS
"El Rancho Grande," music and lyrics by Silivan R. Ramos, English lyrics by Bartley Costello.
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 October 1950
Production Date:
25 January--early March 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 July 1950
Copyright Number:
LP270
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89-90
Length(in feet):
8,064
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14481
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Sean O'Malley, a wheelchair-bound fight promoter who was once known as the best in his business, has lost his professional stature and is now suffering from poor health. Sean's daughter Pat has taken over many of her father's responsibilities, and is romantically involved with Sean's best fighter, Johnny Monterez. Though Sean had hoped that Johnny would help to revive his flagging career, he dislikes the fact that Johnny is ashamed of his Mexican heritage. When Sean tells Pat that promoter Allan Goff is trying to steal Johnny from him, Pat decides to visit Johnny at his training camp. Pat arrives in time to watch Johnny fight a practice match, but the match ends abruptly when fighter Marty Lynn injures Johnny's hand. While Johnny's hand is being examined at the hospital, Pat looks for her friend, Rick Gavery, a hard-drinking sports reporter who has been following Johnny's career. Pat eventually finds Rick in jail, where she has found him on many previous occasions. When Johnny's physician, Dr. George Esmond, tells him that his hand is now vulnerable to permanent injury, Johnny asks the doctor to keep his condition a secret. After telling Pat and some reporters that his hand is merely bruised, Johnny returns to his training camp. A short time later, Johnny receives word that his trouble-prone cousin, Luis, is in jail again and needs two hundred dollars for bail. The news reminds Johnny that Luis, who is also a Mexican immigrant, has not had the same opportunities that he has had to lift himself out of poverty. Believing that his hand injury may end his boxing career at any moment, Johnny decides to sign ... +


Sean O'Malley, a wheelchair-bound fight promoter who was once known as the best in his business, has lost his professional stature and is now suffering from poor health. Sean's daughter Pat has taken over many of her father's responsibilities, and is romantically involved with Sean's best fighter, Johnny Monterez. Though Sean had hoped that Johnny would help to revive his flagging career, he dislikes the fact that Johnny is ashamed of his Mexican heritage. When Sean tells Pat that promoter Allan Goff is trying to steal Johnny from him, Pat decides to visit Johnny at his training camp. Pat arrives in time to watch Johnny fight a practice match, but the match ends abruptly when fighter Marty Lynn injures Johnny's hand. While Johnny's hand is being examined at the hospital, Pat looks for her friend, Rick Gavery, a hard-drinking sports reporter who has been following Johnny's career. Pat eventually finds Rick in jail, where she has found him on many previous occasions. When Johnny's physician, Dr. George Esmond, tells him that his hand is now vulnerable to permanent injury, Johnny asks the doctor to keep his condition a secret. After telling Pat and some reporters that his hand is merely bruised, Johnny returns to his training camp. A short time later, Johnny receives word that his trouble-prone cousin, Luis, is in jail again and needs two hundred dollars for bail. The news reminds Johnny that Luis, who is also a Mexican immigrant, has not had the same opportunities that he has had to lift himself out of poverty. Believing that his hand injury may end his boxing career at any moment, Johnny decides to sign a lucrative contract with Goff, who has promised to provide him with a guaranteed income from promotional sales after his retirement. Johnny takes Rick to visit his mother, but soon after they arrive, Johnny tells his sister Marina that she must stop dating her boyfriend, Bob, because he is a "gringo." Johnny also tells Marina that Bob is interested in her only because she is the sister of a famous fighter. When Rick accuses Johnny of harboring a prejudice against whites, Johnny sends him away with an insult. Later, Pat, expecting a marriage proposal from Johnny, is disappointed when Johnny tells her that he has decided to sign with Goff. Sean dies a short time later, and Pat accuses Johnny of killing her father with his act of betrayal. Realizing that he has nearly lost Pat's love and Rick's friendship as a result of his actions, Johnny decides to get out of boxing forever by purposely losing the upcoming title match against Al Heldon. Though he loses the match, Johnny does not cause permanent injury to his hand until he punches Rick for being honest with him. With help from Rick, Pat and Johnny reconcile and look forward to a happy future together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.