Tea for Two (1950)

97 mins | Musical comedy | 2 September 1950

Director:

David Butler

Writer:

Harry Clork

Producer:

William Jacobs

Cinematographer:

Wilfrid M. Cline

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Douglas Bacon

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Tea for Two marked the film debuts of Patrice Wymore and Virginia Gibson. This was the first of four Warner Bros. films that starred Doris Day and Gordon MacRae. The others were On Moonlight Bay (1951), Starlift (1951) and By the Light of the Silvery Moon ... More Less

Tea for Two marked the film debuts of Patrice Wymore and Virginia Gibson. This was the first of four Warner Bros. films that starred Doris Day and Gordon MacRae. The others were On Moonlight Bay (1951), Starlift (1951) and By the Light of the Silvery Moon (1953). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Aug 1950.
---
Daily Variety
15 Aug 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Aug 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 50
p. 53.
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 50
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Aug 50
p. 441.
New York Times
2 Sep 50
p. 11.
Variety
16 Aug 50
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
Asst cam
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst props
COSTUMES
Men's ward
Asst men's ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Mus numbers dir by
Dances staged by
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Best boy
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Tech
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical No! No! Nanette! by Frank Mandel, Otto Harbach, Vincent Youmans and Emil Nyitray (New York, 16 Sep 1925).
SONGS
"Charleston," music and lyrics by Cecil Mack and James P. Johnson
"I Know That You Know," music and lyrics by Anne Caldwell and Vincent Youmans
"Crazy Rhythm," music and lyrics by Irving Caesar, Joseph Meyer and Roger Wolfe Kahn
+
SONGS
"Charleston," music and lyrics by Cecil Mack and James P. Johnson
"I Know That You Know," music and lyrics by Anne Caldwell and Vincent Youmans
"Crazy Rhythm," music and lyrics by Irving Caesar, Joseph Meyer and Roger Wolfe Kahn
"I Only Have Eyes for You," music and lyrics by Al Dubin and Harry Warren
"Tea for Two" and "I Want to Be Happy," music and lyrics by Irving Caesar and Vincent Youmans
"Do, Do, Do," music and lyrics by Ira Gershwin and George Gershwin
"Oh Me! Oh My! Oh You!" music and lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Vincent Youmans
"Here in My Arms," music and lyrics by Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers
"No, No, Nanette," music and lyrics by Otto Harbach and Vincent Youmans.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 September 1950
Production Date:
late March--early May 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 August 1950
Copyright Number:
LP334
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
97
Length(in feet):
8,787
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14522
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When teenagers Lynne and Richard dress up in their parents' clothes from the 1920's for the amusement of some friends, their uncle, J. Maxwell Bloomhaus, chides them for making fun of their parents. He tells them what it was like for people in 1929 after the stock market crashed: In 1929, Max is the guardian of his niece Nanette Carter's fortune. Because of his bad investments, Nanette's fortune is lost in the crash. The stagestruck Nanette, who is unaware of her loss, is being pestered by theatrical producer Larry Blair to back a show written by Jimmy Smith and Tommy Trainor. To help convince her, Larry brings Jimmy and Tommy to Nanette's house, where he pretends that Jimmy needs the money from the show to pay for his sister's operation. Tommy and Jimmy play her some songs from the show, and despite the misgivings of her secretary, Pauline Hastings, Nanette agrees to back the show. Jimmy then suggests that Nanette play the lead, replacing Larry's girl friend, Beatrice Darcy. That night, Nanette asks Max to sell some of her securities. Not wanting to tell her that he sold her securities long ago, Max agrees to give her the money on condition that she say "no" to everything for forty-eight hours. When Nanette's negative responses to some of Larry's questions drive the other backers away, Nanette invites the entire cast to rehearse at her house over the weekend. Trying to force Nanette to break her promise, Max compels her to deny that she likes the play and the songs. He then learns from his lawyer, William Early, that he might be ... +


When teenagers Lynne and Richard dress up in their parents' clothes from the 1920's for the amusement of some friends, their uncle, J. Maxwell Bloomhaus, chides them for making fun of their parents. He tells them what it was like for people in 1929 after the stock market crashed: In 1929, Max is the guardian of his niece Nanette Carter's fortune. Because of his bad investments, Nanette's fortune is lost in the crash. The stagestruck Nanette, who is unaware of her loss, is being pestered by theatrical producer Larry Blair to back a show written by Jimmy Smith and Tommy Trainor. To help convince her, Larry brings Jimmy and Tommy to Nanette's house, where he pretends that Jimmy needs the money from the show to pay for his sister's operation. Tommy and Jimmy play her some songs from the show, and despite the misgivings of her secretary, Pauline Hastings, Nanette agrees to back the show. Jimmy then suggests that Nanette play the lead, replacing Larry's girl friend, Beatrice Darcy. That night, Nanette asks Max to sell some of her securities. Not wanting to tell her that he sold her securities long ago, Max agrees to give her the money on condition that she say "no" to everything for forty-eight hours. When Nanette's negative responses to some of Larry's questions drive the other backers away, Nanette invites the entire cast to rehearse at her house over the weekend. Trying to force Nanette to break her promise, Max compels her to deny that she likes the play and the songs. He then learns from his lawyer, William Early, that he might be able to save some of the lost fortune if he can sign certain papers before ten o'clock, but after Nanette is stopped for reckless driving, her negative answers to the policeman's questions lands them both in jail. Later, Max encourages Jimmy to propose to Nanette, but even though she loves Jimmy, Nanette does not say "yes." Having lost his bet, Max is forced to tell Nanette the truth. Larry returns the show to Tommy, who suggests they raise the money themselves. Pauline uses her feminine wiles to convince Early to back the production, now called No, No, Nanette , and it is a success. Pauline and Early get married, as do Nanette and Jimmy. Max finishes his story just before Nanette and Jimmy return home to their children. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.