Caught in the Draft (1941)

82 mins | Comedy | 4 July 1941

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

B. G. DeSylva

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Haldane Douglas

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a news item in HR , producer B. G. DeSylva created the original story idea and collaborated on the story development of this, his first picture for Paramount. According to the press book, the National Guardsmen trained the actors to look like real soldiers, and Look noted that the film was produced under the guidance of the War Department. Charles Schoenbaum is credited with photography in HR production charts through 7 Feb 1941; Karl Struss, who received screen credit, is credited in production charts beginning 14 Feb 1941. A 1 Apr 1941 news item in HR noted that Paramount planned its press preview for Fort Ord, CA on 2 May 1941, where it was expected that Major General Joseph W. Stilwell would oversee the proceedings. Bob Hope, in his autobiography, notes that some scenes were shot at Malibu Canyon, which he later purchased, and that Harry Ray was his makeup ... More Less

According to a news item in HR , producer B. G. DeSylva created the original story idea and collaborated on the story development of this, his first picture for Paramount. According to the press book, the National Guardsmen trained the actors to look like real soldiers, and Look noted that the film was produced under the guidance of the War Department. Charles Schoenbaum is credited with photography in HR production charts through 7 Feb 1941; Karl Struss, who received screen credit, is credited in production charts beginning 14 Feb 1941. A 1 Apr 1941 news item in HR noted that Paramount planned its press preview for Fort Ord, CA on 2 May 1941, where it was expected that Major General Joseph W. Stilwell would oversee the proceedings. Bob Hope, in his autobiography, notes that some scenes were shot at Malibu Canyon, which he later purchased, and that Harry Ray was his makeup man. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 May 1941.
---
Daily Variety
26 May 1941.
---
Film Daily
29 May 41
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 41
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 41
p. 3.
Look
17 Jun 1941.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Apr 41
p. 110.
New York Times
26 Jun 41
p. 27.
Variety
28 May 41
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story and scr
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
SOURCES
SONGS
"Love Me as I Am," words and music by Louis Alter and Frank Loesser.
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 July 1941
Production Date:
early January--early March 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 May 1941
Copyright Number:
LP11050
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82
Length(in feet):
8,114
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Lead actor Don Bolton practically faints from the sounds of gunshots while filming a war movie. When real-life Colonel Peter Fairbanks visits the set with his beautiful daughter Tony, Don insults them by mistaking Fairbanks for an actor and ordering the makeup man to put mud on the colonel. Smitten by Tony, Don convinces her to go out with him. He soon proposes to her to keep himself from being drafted but backs out when the draft age is raised to thirty-five. Tony is appalled when she discovers his ulterior motive, and to improve her opinion of him, Don goes to his local recruitment office to enlist, but discovers too late that he is dealing with a real enlistment officer, not the actor that he hired. At training camp with his assistant Bert and manager Steve, Don visits Tony and her father, who is stationed there, and Fairbanks makes a deal with Don that if he can actually make the rank of corporal, he will consent to his marriage to Tony. Don, Bert and Steve consistently get into trouble, however, and spend most of their time on kitchen patrol. Tony, having fallen in love with Don, defends him to her father. Finally, Don, Bert and Steve's sergeant leaves them behind to keep them out of trouble while the rest of the unit participates in war games. The trio decides to change some of the signposts to help their unit win; however, the signs lead the troop directly into an artillery range. Tony, who has been berating the three men as cowards, attempts to pass through the line of fire to save the troops, but ... +


Lead actor Don Bolton practically faints from the sounds of gunshots while filming a war movie. When real-life Colonel Peter Fairbanks visits the set with his beautiful daughter Tony, Don insults them by mistaking Fairbanks for an actor and ordering the makeup man to put mud on the colonel. Smitten by Tony, Don convinces her to go out with him. He soon proposes to her to keep himself from being drafted but backs out when the draft age is raised to thirty-five. Tony is appalled when she discovers his ulterior motive, and to improve her opinion of him, Don goes to his local recruitment office to enlist, but discovers too late that he is dealing with a real enlistment officer, not the actor that he hired. At training camp with his assistant Bert and manager Steve, Don visits Tony and her father, who is stationed there, and Fairbanks makes a deal with Don that if he can actually make the rank of corporal, he will consent to his marriage to Tony. Don, Bert and Steve consistently get into trouble, however, and spend most of their time on kitchen patrol. Tony, having fallen in love with Don, defends him to her father. Finally, Don, Bert and Steve's sergeant leaves them behind to keep them out of trouble while the rest of the unit participates in war games. The trio decides to change some of the signposts to help their unit win; however, the signs lead the troop directly into an artillery range. Tony, who has been berating the three men as cowards, attempts to pass through the line of fire to save the troops, but when her horse throws her, Dan overcomes his fear of gunfire, even after being hit in the arm, and crawls through the firing range to head off the troops. Don, Bert and Steve earn their promotions and Don and Tony marry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.