In Old Cheyenne (1941)

58 mins | Western | 28 March 1941

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HISTORY

A HR production chart lists Les Orlebeck as the film's editor, although the onscreen credits list Charles Craft. In Old Cheyenne marked the film debut of Donnell "Spade" Cooley (1910--1969), who began his career as a fiddle player with The Sons of the Pioneers before forming his own orchestra. Known as the "king of western swing," Cooley enjoyed great success as the host of a popular television variety program, The Spade Cooley Show , which ran on Los Angeles station KTLA (1948--1956). In 1961, Cooley was arrested for, and convicted of, the murder of his estranged wife. In Nov 1969, Cooley was given a short leave to perform at a benefit for the Alameda County Deputy Sheriff's Association, during which he died of a heart attack. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: Bob Woodward, Jim Corey, Cactus Mack, George Lloyd, Billy Benedict , Jack O'Shea, Edward Peil, Sr., Merrill McCormack , Ted Mapes, Ben Corbett, Nick Thompson and Frank ... More Less

A HR production chart lists Les Orlebeck as the film's editor, although the onscreen credits list Charles Craft. In Old Cheyenne marked the film debut of Donnell "Spade" Cooley (1910--1969), who began his career as a fiddle player with The Sons of the Pioneers before forming his own orchestra. Known as the "king of western swing," Cooley enjoyed great success as the host of a popular television variety program, The Spade Cooley Show , which ran on Los Angeles station KTLA (1948--1956). In 1961, Cooley was arrested for, and convicted of, the murder of his estranged wife. In Nov 1969, Cooley was given a short leave to perform at a benefit for the Alameda County Deputy Sheriff's Association, during which he died of a heart attack. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: Bob Woodward, Jim Corey, Cactus Mack, George Lloyd, Billy Benedict , Jack O'Shea, Edward Peil, Sr., Merrill McCormack , Ted Mapes, Ben Corbett, Nick Thompson and Frank Ellis. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Apr 1941.
---
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1941.
---
Film Daily
4 Apr 41
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 41
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 41
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 41
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 41
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Apr 41
p. 41.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Apr 41
p. 98.
Variety
16 Apr 41
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Bonita," words and music by Jule Styne and Sol Meyer
"Linda Flor," words and music by Rudy Sooter and Aaron Gonzales.
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 March 1941
Production Date:
10 February--late February 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 March 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10387
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
58
Length(in feet):
5,096
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7123
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

New York reporter Steve Blane travels by train to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he intends to investigate the notorious Arapaho Brown, a rustler and outlaw who has been blamed for the ongoing feud between cattlemen and settlers. On the way he meets Spanish dancer Dolores Cansino, who reveals that her American father, Tim Casey, is the newspaper owner whom Steve will be contacting. Their train is held up by a masked gang led by Davidge, although the men lead the passengers to believe that Arapaho is behind the robbery. Dolores and Steve are given a wagon ride to town, where they are greeted by Tim, who calls Dolores "Della," and Sam Drummond, a cattle baron and prominent citizen. The party held in Dolores' honor is interrupted by Davidge's gang, however, who hold up everyone. Drummond, who is secretly Davidge's boss, helps the gang escape. Later, Steve is captured by the gang, who are about to lynch him when he is saved by the wagon driver he met earlier. When the old man takes him to his home, he reveals that he is Arapaho Brown and that Drummond is trying to force out the settlers in James County so that he can take control of their land. Arapaho's foster daughter Squeak prevails upon Steve to stay for the settler's square dance that evening, but once again Davidge and his men show up. Steve leads the gang away from the settlers and escapes with help from his horse "Trigger." Davidge believes that he has killed Steve, and Drummond decides to blame the murder on Arapaho. Steve tells the whole story to Dolores ... +


New York reporter Steve Blane travels by train to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he intends to investigate the notorious Arapaho Brown, a rustler and outlaw who has been blamed for the ongoing feud between cattlemen and settlers. On the way he meets Spanish dancer Dolores Cansino, who reveals that her American father, Tim Casey, is the newspaper owner whom Steve will be contacting. Their train is held up by a masked gang led by Davidge, although the men lead the passengers to believe that Arapaho is behind the robbery. Dolores and Steve are given a wagon ride to town, where they are greeted by Tim, who calls Dolores "Della," and Sam Drummond, a cattle baron and prominent citizen. The party held in Dolores' honor is interrupted by Davidge's gang, however, who hold up everyone. Drummond, who is secretly Davidge's boss, helps the gang escape. Later, Steve is captured by the gang, who are about to lynch him when he is saved by the wagon driver he met earlier. When the old man takes him to his home, he reveals that he is Arapaho Brown and that Drummond is trying to force out the settlers in James County so that he can take control of their land. Arapaho's foster daughter Squeak prevails upon Steve to stay for the settler's square dance that evening, but once again Davidge and his men show up. Steve leads the gang away from the settlers and escapes with help from his horse "Trigger." Davidge believes that he has killed Steve, and Drummond decides to blame the murder on Arapaho. Steve tells the whole story to Dolores and Tim, who is shot and wounded by the gang after he prints the truth about Arapaho and Drummond. As he is getting a wagon to take Tim to Arapaho for treatment, Steve overhears Davidge's men planning to attack the settlers. The men see Steve and Dolores as they put Tim in the wagon and chase them to James County. Steve entrusts Dolores and Tim to Squeak and some of the others while he rushes to find Arapaho, who is organizing the men for the upcoming attack. Squeak leads the defense as the gang sets fire to the house, and soon Steve, Arapaho and the men arrive, and Davidge's men surrender. Later, Steve has become the editor of Tim's paper, and after printing a story about Drummond's conviction, he tells Tim to print a notice about his engagement to Dolores. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.