Kiss the Boys Goodbye (1941)

83 mins | Musical comedy | 1 August 1941

Producer:

William LeBaron

Cinematographer:

Ted Tetzlaff

Editor:

Paul Weatherwax

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Ernst Fegté

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Early pre-production news items in HR note that Walter Abel (who did not appear in the final film) was assigned a principal role, that Ray Milland and Eddie Albert were considered for roles and that Frank Tuttle was considered to direct. In 1940, Twentieth Century-Fox contract actor Don Ameche pulled out of the cast of Paramount's The Night of January 16th , (see below) engendering a lawsuit against him by Paramount. The situation was settled when Ameche agreed to appear in Kiss the Boys Goodbye . Although reviews such as DV noted that the black chorus in the film, described as "field hands" in the script, was "one of the highlights," the singers were not credited in contemporary sources. According to information in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, dancer Louis DaPron was slated to appear in the ... More Less

Early pre-production news items in HR note that Walter Abel (who did not appear in the final film) was assigned a principal role, that Ray Milland and Eddie Albert were considered for roles and that Frank Tuttle was considered to direct. In 1940, Twentieth Century-Fox contract actor Don Ameche pulled out of the cast of Paramount's The Night of January 16th , (see below) engendering a lawsuit against him by Paramount. The situation was settled when Ameche agreed to appear in Kiss the Boys Goodbye . Although reviews such as DV noted that the black chorus in the film, described as "field hands" in the script, was "one of the highlights," the singers were not credited in contemporary sources. According to information in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, dancer Louis DaPron was slated to appear in the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Jul 41
p. 327.
Box Office
28 Jun 1941.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1941.
---
Film Daily
23 Jun 41
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 40
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 40
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 41
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 41
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
23 May 1940.
---
Motion Picture Herald
28 Jun 1941.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 May 41
p. 145.
New York Times
22 Sep 1940.
---
New York Times
14 Aug 41
p. 21.
Variety
15 Jun 41
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst to 2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus adv
Songs arranged and conducted by
DANCE
Dance dir
Asst dance dir
Asst dance dir
MAKEUP
Hair supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Kiss the Boys Goodbye by Clare Boothe (New York, 28 Sep 1938).
SONGS
"Kiss the Boys Goodbye," "Find Yourself a Melody," "Sand in My Shoes," "I Never Let a Day Pass By" and "My Start," music by Victor Schertzinger, lyrics by Frank Loesser
"Ma Curly-Headed Babby," music and lyrics by G. H. Clutsam.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 August 1941
Production Date:
17 January--27 February 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 August 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10631
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83
Length(in feet):
7,683
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7051
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

New York chorus girl Cindy Lou Bethany becomes frustrated when she prepares for an audition for a Broadway musical, but the auditions close and her roommate, Gwen Abbott, is hired to be secretary to Top Rumson, the show's financial backer. Gwen tells Cindy that the director, Lloyd Lloyd, and composer, Dick Rayburn, have been sent to the South on a talent search for a classic Southern belle type to star in the show, although their shows usually feature Myra Stanhope, an actress whose style is hopelessly inappropriate for this show. Desperate for work, Cindy returns to her aunt Lily Lou and uncle Jefferson Davis Bethany's home in the South and schemes to get Lloyd and Rayburn to audition her. Uncle Jeff waylays Lloyd and Rayburn off their train and brings them to Magnolia Manor, where Cindy, donning a nineteenth-century dress and manner, proceeds to sing for her captive audience, backed by a chorus of black singers. Lloyd, who remains steadfastly in support of Myra, knows he is being framed and resents Cindy's presumption. However, Rayburn is delighted by Cindy and unknown to Lloyd, asks her to return to New York with them. Cindy, who previously worked hard to lose her Southern accent, continues to play up her heritage, much to the irritation of Lloyd, who does not want to have to direct an apparent amateur. When the show's producer, Bert Fisher, arranges for their "discovery" to be introduced to the press during an evening at Rumson's home, Lloyd finally relents and arranges for Cindy to sing a love song. However, Cindy learns from Gwen that Lloyd has been planning to star Myra all along and Cindy vengefully decides ... +


New York chorus girl Cindy Lou Bethany becomes frustrated when she prepares for an audition for a Broadway musical, but the auditions close and her roommate, Gwen Abbott, is hired to be secretary to Top Rumson, the show's financial backer. Gwen tells Cindy that the director, Lloyd Lloyd, and composer, Dick Rayburn, have been sent to the South on a talent search for a classic Southern belle type to star in the show, although their shows usually feature Myra Stanhope, an actress whose style is hopelessly inappropriate for this show. Desperate for work, Cindy returns to her aunt Lily Lou and uncle Jefferson Davis Bethany's home in the South and schemes to get Lloyd and Rayburn to audition her. Uncle Jeff waylays Lloyd and Rayburn off their train and brings them to Magnolia Manor, where Cindy, donning a nineteenth-century dress and manner, proceeds to sing for her captive audience, backed by a chorus of black singers. Lloyd, who remains steadfastly in support of Myra, knows he is being framed and resents Cindy's presumption. However, Rayburn is delighted by Cindy and unknown to Lloyd, asks her to return to New York with them. Cindy, who previously worked hard to lose her Southern accent, continues to play up her heritage, much to the irritation of Lloyd, who does not want to have to direct an apparent amateur. When the show's producer, Bert Fisher, arranges for their "discovery" to be introduced to the press during an evening at Rumson's home, Lloyd finally relents and arranges for Cindy to sing a love song. However, Cindy learns from Gwen that Lloyd has been planning to star Myra all along and Cindy vengefully decides to perform a striptease that she had prepared with Rayburn. The audience and Lloyd are impressed with her sophisticated revue, which ends as she tosses her lace pantaloons onto Myra's head and dives into the pool. Myra then picks a fight with Cindy, who loses her temper and pushes the actress into the pool. Cindy packs to leave, and unable to take the strain any longer, admits her ruse and insists that she did it out of desperation. Cindy returns to the South and Lloyd realizes he has just lost a fine actress. At Magnolia Manor, Cindy is surprised when she is serenaded by Lloyd, backed by a chorus, and the couple, finally admitting their love for each other, embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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