Saddlemates (1941)

55-56 mins | Western | 26 May 1941

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Old Spanish Trail . A 18 Apr 1941 HR production chart lists Bud Thackeray as the photographer, although the onscreen credits list William Nobles. Modern sources include Chief Yowlachie, Henry Wills, Bill Hazlett and Major Bill Keefer in the cast. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and see entry for The Three Mesquiteers in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The working title of this film was Old Spanish Trail . A 18 Apr 1941 HR production chart lists Bud Thackeray as the photographer, although the onscreen credits list William Nobles. Modern sources include Chief Yowlachie, Henry Wills, Bill Hazlett and Major Bill Keefer in the cast. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and see entry for The Three Mesquiteers in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.4617. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Jun 1941.
---
Film Daily
11 Jun 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 41
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Apr 41
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
14 Jun 41
p. 36.
Variety
18 Jun 1941.
---
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Old Spanish Trail
Release Date:
26 May 1941
Production Date:
14 April--23 April 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
26 May 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10537
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55-56
Length(in feet):
5,028
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7321
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When Congress changes a boundary between Mexico and Texas, the rangers of the Red River headquarters leave their station, and a U.S. Cavalry unit, headed by Colonel Langley, takes over and prepares to deal with the hostile Indians. Ranger Captain Miller warns Langley that the warmongering Wanechee will be difficult to apprehend, and that his own best men, "Stony" Brooke, "Tucson" Smith and "Lullaby" Joslin, who are known as "The Three Mesquiteers," are searching for him. When the Mesquiteers return to the post, they learn that Langley wants them to stay on as scouts. The Mesquiteers want nothing to do with the cavalry, but change their minds after meeting Langley's pretty daughter Susan. After they sign on, the Mesquiteers tell Langley that he is wrong to initiate peace talks with the Indians, but he insists that the fighting must end. He sends Stony, Tucson and two troopers to follow the post's half-breed interpretor, LeRoque, on a mission to propose a peaceful meeting with Wanechee and the other chiefs. LeRoque, who is actually Wanechee, plans an ambush, but Tucson spots the trap. Although Tucson and Stony escape, one of the troopers is killed, and Langley, thinking that the Mesquiteers are to blame, arrests them. Susan, who believes that they should be given another chance, talks Langley into releasing them, but after they are involved in a saloon brawl, Stony is discharged from the cavalry and Susan turns against him. Determined to investigate LeRoque, of whom they have become suspicious, Tucson and Lullaby also get discharged. While exploring the hills, the Mesquiteers are captured by Wanechee, whom they do not recognize as LeRoque, while he is ... +


When Congress changes a boundary between Mexico and Texas, the rangers of the Red River headquarters leave their station, and a U.S. Cavalry unit, headed by Colonel Langley, takes over and prepares to deal with the hostile Indians. Ranger Captain Miller warns Langley that the warmongering Wanechee will be difficult to apprehend, and that his own best men, "Stony" Brooke, "Tucson" Smith and "Lullaby" Joslin, who are known as "The Three Mesquiteers," are searching for him. When the Mesquiteers return to the post, they learn that Langley wants them to stay on as scouts. The Mesquiteers want nothing to do with the cavalry, but change their minds after meeting Langley's pretty daughter Susan. After they sign on, the Mesquiteers tell Langley that he is wrong to initiate peace talks with the Indians, but he insists that the fighting must end. He sends Stony, Tucson and two troopers to follow the post's half-breed interpretor, LeRoque, on a mission to propose a peaceful meeting with Wanechee and the other chiefs. LeRoque, who is actually Wanechee, plans an ambush, but Tucson spots the trap. Although Tucson and Stony escape, one of the troopers is killed, and Langley, thinking that the Mesquiteers are to blame, arrests them. Susan, who believes that they should be given another chance, talks Langley into releasing them, but after they are involved in a saloon brawl, Stony is discharged from the cavalry and Susan turns against him. Determined to investigate LeRoque, of whom they have become suspicious, Tucson and Lullaby also get discharged. While exploring the hills, the Mesquiteers are captured by Wanechee, whom they do not recognize as LeRoque, while he is preparing a trap for a wagon train. The Mesquiteers escape with two Indians as prisoners, and while they question them at their hideout, LeRoque tells Langley that there will be no peace while the Mesquiteers keep their prisoners. Langley sends Lieutenant Bob Manning to get the Mesquiteers, but while they are talking to the troopers, LeRoque's henchman beats the prisoners to death to prevent them from talking. After the Mesquiteers are arrested for murder, LeRoque convinces peaceful Chief Thunder Bird that the Indians must attack the wagon train, which carries rifles as well as Langley's wife and son. As Manning is returning the Mesquiteers to the post, LeRoque sends word to Langley that the wagon train has been delayed until the next day, and that he should meet the chiefs for a peace treaty. Langley and his men are captured by LeRoque, and after the Indians put on their uniforms, they meet the wagon train. Meanwhile, the Mesquiteers reach the post, and Susan pleads with Bob to let them go. He refuses, but the Mesquiteers escape from the guardhouse, and while Lullaby and Stony ride to find the colonel, Tucson goes to aid the wagon train. Stony and Lullaby arrive with Langley as the settlers are about to be overwhelmed, and soon LeRoque is exposed as Wanechee. Later, the Langleys express their thanks to the Mesquiteers, who then leave to begin peace talks with Thunder Bird. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.