Vacation from Marriage (1945)

92 or 94 mins | Comedy-drama | November 1945

Director:

Alexander Korda

Producer:

Alexander Korda

Cinematographer:

Georges Perinal

Editor:

E. B. Jarvis

Production Designer:

Vincent Korda

Production Companies:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp., Alexander Korda Films, Inc.
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HISTORY

Although the opening credits refer to "M-G-M," the closing credits list the studio as "M-G-M London Film Productions Limited in England." The opening credits read "Clemence Dane's Vacation from Marriage." This film had its premiere in London in Aug 1945, under the title Perfect Strangers . Wesley Ruggles was originally hired as the director of the co-production, but a May 1944 HR news item reported that Korda had taken over the direction because of disagreements with Ruggles over the story. Although Korda and M-G-M had agreed to co-produce several films, Vacation from Marriage was their first and last collaboration. Some location shooting was done in Scotland, but most scenes were shot in London, where, according to a Nov 1944 HR news item, images of recent war wreckage were used to add realism to the film's background. According to information in the MPAA/PCA file at the AMPAS Library, the British version of the film ran about 102 minutes, while the American version was cut to about 92 ... More Less

Although the opening credits refer to "M-G-M," the closing credits list the studio as "M-G-M London Film Productions Limited in England." The opening credits read "Clemence Dane's Vacation from Marriage." This film had its premiere in London in Aug 1945, under the title Perfect Strangers . Wesley Ruggles was originally hired as the director of the co-production, but a May 1944 HR news item reported that Korda had taken over the direction because of disagreements with Ruggles over the story. Although Korda and M-G-M had agreed to co-produce several films, Vacation from Marriage was their first and last collaboration. Some location shooting was done in Scotland, but most scenes were shot in London, where, according to a Nov 1944 HR news item, images of recent war wreckage were used to add realism to the film's background. According to information in the MPAA/PCA file at the AMPAS Library, the British version of the film ran about 102 minutes, while the American version was cut to about 92 minutes. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
31 Dec 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 44
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Nov 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Dec 1945.
---
New York Times
29 Oct 1944.
---
New York Times
15 Mar 1946. p. 27.
---
Variety
7 Nov 1945.
---
Variety
28 Nov 1945.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Alexander Korda's Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam asst
Cam asst
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc art dir
Assoc art dir
Draughtsman
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SOUND
Sd dir
Dubbing ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc mgr
Cont asst
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Can't Give You Anything But Love," words by Dorothy Fields, music by Jimmy McHugh
"I've Got Sixpence (As I Go Rolling Home)," words and music by Elton Box and Desmond Cox
"Lament for Nelson," words by Clemence Dane, music by Richard Addison
+
SONGS
"I Can't Give You Anything But Love," words by Dorothy Fields, music by Jimmy McHugh
"I've Got Sixpence (As I Go Rolling Home)," words and music by Elton Box and Desmond Cox
"Lament for Nelson," words by Clemence Dane, music by Richard Addison
"I Don't Want to Be Hurt Again," composers undetermined.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Perfect Strangers
Release Date:
November 1945
Premiere Information:
London, England opening: August 1945
Production Date:
began late May 1944 at Elstree Studios, England
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 November 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13705
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
92 or 94
Length(in feet):
9,224
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
PCA No:
11265
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Milquetoast Robert Wilson and his meek wife Catherine have been married for four years when Robert prepares to join the British navy and fight in World War II. The day he leaves, he battles nerves and stomach problems while Cathy, suffering from one of her endless colds, quietly says goodbye. During boot camp, Robert struggles with seasickness and lowly conditions. A short time later, Cathy joins the Wrens, the Women's Naval Service, and has similar difficulties with the arduous training schedule. Soon, however, Cathy's tough friend, Dizzy Clayton, teaches her how to improve her appearance and have more confidence, while Robert becomes more rugged and confident himself. As London suffers continued bombing over the next few years, Robert and Cathy write to each other, but never manage to have leave at the same time. They both advance in their positions, learning much about themselves and their strengths as they succeed. Robert describes Cathy to his friends as dependable, while she tells Dizzy that Robert is not as exciting as Dizzy's dashing cousin, Richard, with whom she has been spending much of her free time. One day, Robert's boat is attacked by enemy fire, and although his hands are badly burned, he spends five days rowing his shipmates to safety. While recuperating in the hospital, he meets a nurse, Elena, and soon asks her to dinner. After they dance together, Elena, a war widow, kisses him and then leaves. Days later in England, as Richard declares his love for her, Cathy informs him that she must meet Robert for ten days, for the first time in three years. As Cathy and Robert travel separately toward London, each thinks about how ... +


Milquetoast Robert Wilson and his meek wife Catherine have been married for four years when Robert prepares to join the British navy and fight in World War II. The day he leaves, he battles nerves and stomach problems while Cathy, suffering from one of her endless colds, quietly says goodbye. During boot camp, Robert struggles with seasickness and lowly conditions. A short time later, Cathy joins the Wrens, the Women's Naval Service, and has similar difficulties with the arduous training schedule. Soon, however, Cathy's tough friend, Dizzy Clayton, teaches her how to improve her appearance and have more confidence, while Robert becomes more rugged and confident himself. As London suffers continued bombing over the next few years, Robert and Cathy write to each other, but never manage to have leave at the same time. They both advance in their positions, learning much about themselves and their strengths as they succeed. Robert describes Cathy to his friends as dependable, while she tells Dizzy that Robert is not as exciting as Dizzy's dashing cousin, Richard, with whom she has been spending much of her free time. One day, Robert's boat is attacked by enemy fire, and although his hands are badly burned, he spends five days rowing his shipmates to safety. While recuperating in the hospital, he meets a nurse, Elena, and soon asks her to dinner. After they dance together, Elena, a war widow, kisses him and then leaves. Days later in England, as Richard declares his love for her, Cathy informs him that she must meet Robert for ten days, for the first time in three years. As Cathy and Robert travel separately toward London, each thinks about how little either one wants to return to their dreary former life. Robert arrives first at their flat with his friend, Scotty, complaining about having to see Cathy, but when she telephones from the street and declares that she no longer loves him, he is hurt. They meet on a street corner, which was dark because of the nightly blackouts and agree to a divorce, each sure that the other one will be helpless alone. When they enter a pub to continue the discussion, Cathy is pleasantly startled at Robert's strength and handsomeness, and Robert is shocked to see how confident and glamorous Cathy looks. As they talk, the pub proprietors, who are celebrating their fiftieth wedding anniversary, invite everyone to dance, and Cathy and Robert dance together for the first time. When Dizzy and Scotty join them, however, Scotty clumsily reveals to Cathy that Robert has described her as dependent. She storms out and they fight in the street, after which Robert wanders the streets in confusion, while Cathy visits the flat and reminisces about the love they used to share. Robert finds himself drawn back to her, and when he arrives, Cathy shows him how the walls that used to block their windows have come down in the bombing, flooding the apartment with light. They look out over the ravaged city and, realizing that anything can be built back up again, no matter how long it takes, they kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.