The Fleet's In (1942)

93 mins | Musical, Romantic comedy | 1942

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HISTORY

Monte Brice and J. Walter Ruben, who are given a story credit onscreen, actually wrote the story and scenario for the 1928 Paramount release The Fleet's In , on which this film is partly based (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.1814). Director/composer Victor Schertzinger died on 26 Oct 1941, three days before the end of the film's production. According to HR news items, Ralph Murphy finished directing the film but declined screen credit "so that the film could stand as a monument to a fine musical talent." Dorothy Lamour stated in her autobiography that assistant director Hal Walker finished directing the film, but no contemporary information has been found to confirm this.
       A HR news item reported that Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were slated to co-star in this film, and that Paramount made prints of the "Arthur Murray Taught Me to Dance" number for a "distribution tie-up with the Arthur Murray Dance Studios." This film marked the feature film debut of Betty Hutton (1921--2007), who became one of the most popular musical comedy stars of the 1940s. Other Paramount films based on Kenyon Nicholson and Charles Robinson's play are as follows: Lady Be Careful ; 1936, directed by Theodore Reed and starring Lew Ayres and Mary Carlisle (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2340); and Sailor Beware , 1951, directed by Hal Walker and starring Dean Martin and Jerry ... More Less

Monte Brice and J. Walter Ruben, who are given a story credit onscreen, actually wrote the story and scenario for the 1928 Paramount release The Fleet's In , on which this film is partly based (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.1814). Director/composer Victor Schertzinger died on 26 Oct 1941, three days before the end of the film's production. According to HR news items, Ralph Murphy finished directing the film but declined screen credit "so that the film could stand as a monument to a fine musical talent." Dorothy Lamour stated in her autobiography that assistant director Hal Walker finished directing the film, but no contemporary information has been found to confirm this.
       A HR news item reported that Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were slated to co-star in this film, and that Paramount made prints of the "Arthur Murray Taught Me to Dance" number for a "distribution tie-up with the Arthur Murray Dance Studios." This film marked the feature film debut of Betty Hutton (1921--2007), who became one of the most popular musical comedy stars of the 1940s. Other Paramount films based on Kenyon Nicholson and Charles Robinson's play are as follows: Lady Be Careful ; 1936, directed by Theodore Reed and starring Lew Ayres and Mary Carlisle (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2340); and Sailor Beware , 1951, directed by Hal Walker and starring Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Jan 1942.
---
Daily Variety
19 Jan 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Jan 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 41
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 41
p 2.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 42
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Jan 42
p. 474.
New York Times
12 Mar 42
p. 24.
Time
23 Mar 1942.
---
Variety
21 Jan 42
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
and His Orchestra
with
James A. Millican
Katharine Booth
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Fill-In dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus adv
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Sailor, Beware! by Kenyon Nicholson and Charles Robinson (New York, 28 Sep 1933).
SONGS
"The Fleet's In," "I Remember You," "Arthur Murray Taught Me Dancing," "If You Build a Better Mouse Trap," "Tangerine," "Not Mine," "When You Hear the Time Signal," "Tomorrow You Belong to Uncle Sammy," "Somebody Else's Moon" and "Conga from Honga" music by Victor Schertzinger, lyrics by Johnny Mercer.
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: week of 12 March 1942
Production Date:
late September--late October 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 April 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11202
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
93
Length(in feet):
8,357
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7783
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When star Diana Golden performs for a gathering of sailors, shy sailor Casey Kirby goes backstage to get her autograph for his sister. Casey is tricked into a publicity kiss with Golden for the cameras and when his buddy, Barney Waters, reports back to their buddies on ship, the kiss instantly creates Casey's reputation as a notorious ladies' man. When Jake, a real "Don Juan," bets Barney that Casey will not be able to kiss "The Countess," a dance hall singer who is renowned for her aloofness, Barney bets his friend Spike's antique watch, and wagers spread shipwide. Spike threatens Barney with death unless he wins the wager, and so when they dock in San Francisco, Barney immediately takes Casey to The Countess's dance hall, Swingland, and engineers Casey into sitting with the disinterested singer. The Countess pretends to take an interest in Casey when the manager tries to force an obnoxious patron on her, and Casey ends up walking her home. The Countess becomes charmed by Casey despite herself, and she invites him into the hillside apartment she shares with singer Bessie Dale. Bessie returns the same night with Barney, and both couples pursue their flirtations until Barney mentions his wager to Bessie. Bessie interrupts Casey and The Countess just as they are about to kiss and tells The Countess about the bet. Both Barney and Casey are thrown out of the apartment, but Casey soon realizes that he is sincerely in love with The Countess and buys an engagement ring. Bessie meanwhile reveals to The Countess a plan she heard from Barney, in which Casey will propose to her ... +


When star Diana Golden performs for a gathering of sailors, shy sailor Casey Kirby goes backstage to get her autograph for his sister. Casey is tricked into a publicity kiss with Golden for the cameras and when his buddy, Barney Waters, reports back to their buddies on ship, the kiss instantly creates Casey's reputation as a notorious ladies' man. When Jake, a real "Don Juan," bets Barney that Casey will not be able to kiss "The Countess," a dance hall singer who is renowned for her aloofness, Barney bets his friend Spike's antique watch, and wagers spread shipwide. Spike threatens Barney with death unless he wins the wager, and so when they dock in San Francisco, Barney immediately takes Casey to The Countess's dance hall, Swingland, and engineers Casey into sitting with the disinterested singer. The Countess pretends to take an interest in Casey when the manager tries to force an obnoxious patron on her, and Casey ends up walking her home. The Countess becomes charmed by Casey despite herself, and she invites him into the hillside apartment she shares with singer Bessie Dale. Bessie returns the same night with Barney, and both couples pursue their flirtations until Barney mentions his wager to Bessie. Bessie interrupts Casey and The Countess just as they are about to kiss and tells The Countess about the bet. Both Barney and Casey are thrown out of the apartment, but Casey soon realizes that he is sincerely in love with The Countess and buys an engagement ring. Bessie meanwhile reveals to The Countess a plan she heard from Barney, in which Casey will propose to her in order to get a kiss. When Casey does propose, the outraged Countess throws the ring out the window, but Casey explains his sincere intentions, and they retrieve the ring. That night during the show at Swingland, Casey tries to propose again while The Countess dances on a conga line. The club's bouncers think he is drunk and wrestle him to the floor, and a brawl ensues involving all the visiting sailors. Casey is dragged off unconscious as the shore patrol arrives and is later brought to trial as the initiator of the brawl. He refuses to defend himself until The Countess strolls into the courtroom and adopts a hard-boiled attitude, pretending that she deliberately led Casey on to get the ring, and that the bouncers threw the first punch. Casey is acquitted and in the taxi on the way to the Navy dock, Casey and The Countess are married by a minister. At the dock, all the sailors witness Barney win his bet as Casey and The Countess finally kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.