Heart of the Golden West (1942)

65 mins | Western | 11 December 1942

Director:

Joseph I. Kane

Writer:

Earl Felton

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Production Designer:

Russell Kimball

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Most of the songs were cut out of the print viewed. A 4 Jun 1942 HR news item noted that Mauri Grashin and Robert T. Shannon were signed to do a treatment for this film, but the extent of their contribution to the completed picture has not been determined. Although contemporary reviews refer to Smiley Burnette's character as "Smiley," in the film he is called "Frog." According to a NYT article, studio executives ordered the rewriting of an arson scene, during which "Lambert's" men start a fire using a large quantity of gasoline, in order to avoid "reminding theatre patrons of [the] war-time privations" of gasoline rationing. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: Cactus Mack, Carl Mathews, Horace B. Carpenter, Frank McCarroll and Art ... More Less

Most of the songs were cut out of the print viewed. A 4 Jun 1942 HR news item noted that Mauri Grashin and Robert T. Shannon were signed to do a treatment for this film, but the extent of their contribution to the completed picture has not been determined. Although contemporary reviews refer to Smiley Burnette's character as "Smiley," in the film he is called "Frog." According to a NYT article, studio executives ordered the rewriting of an arson scene, during which "Lambert's" men start a fire using a large quantity of gasoline, in order to avoid "reminding theatre patrons of [the] war-time privations" of gasoline rationing. Modern sources include the following actors in the cast: Cactus Mack, Carl Mathews, Horace B. Carpenter, Frank McCarroll and Art Dillard. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Nov 1942.
---
Daily Variety
16 Nov 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Nov 42
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 42
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 42
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Nov 42
p. 1017.
New York Times
20 Sep 1942.
---
Variety
18 Nov 42
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
Choral arr
SOURCES
SONGS
"The River Robin," "Who's Gonna Help Me Sing," "Lone Buckaroo," "Night Falls on the Prairie" and "I Grab My Saddle Horn & Blow," music and lyrics by Bob Nolan
"Cowboys and Indians," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
"Carry Me Back to Old Virginny," music and lyrics by James Bland
+
SONGS
"The River Robin," "Who's Gonna Help Me Sing," "Lone Buckaroo," "Night Falls on the Prairie" and "I Grab My Saddle Horn & Blow," music and lyrics by Bob Nolan
"Cowboys and Indians," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
"Carry Me Back to Old Virginny," music and lyrics by James Bland
"River Chant," music and lyrics by Hall Johnson.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 December 1942
Production Date:
completed 21 September 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
11 December 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11734
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65
Length(in feet):
5,866
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8628
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Ranchers in Cherokee City are furious when trucking company owner Ross Lambert, who holds a monopoly in the area, doubles his rate to transport their cattle to market. Cattlemen's association president James Barrabee, a wishy-washy man who cannot stand up to the ruthless Lambert, relies on his foreman, Roy Rogers, for a solution. Roy realizes that their cattle can be shipped on steamboats, and convinces Barrabee to contact Colonel Silas Popen, the eccentric Southern owner of a steamboat line. Lambert, determined to protect his monopoly, steals a telegram addressed to Roy advising him that Popen hates all things western. Without this information Roy and his singing friends, The Sons of the Pioneers, make a bad first impression, and Popen's opinion of them is worsened by the antics of Roy's pals, "Gabby" Whittaker and Frog. In town, Lambert arranges for a rough-and-tumble saloon brawl to terrify Popen, and it succeeds when the noise scares the horses of Popen's wagon into running wild. Roy saves Popen, his daughter Mary Lou and his black valet, Rango, but upon reaching Barrabee's ranch, the Southerner declares that he will have nothing to do with shipping cattle. Roy angrily tells Popen what he thinks of him and accuses Mary Lou of being a quitter. Deciding to prove Roy wrong, Mary Lou takes matters into her own hands and arranges for the ranchers to round up their cattle and bring them to Barrabee's ranch. Lambert overhears Mary Lou telling Roy the plan, and sends some of his men to set Popen's boat on fire. While all of the ranch hands are putting out the fire, Lambert's men, ... +


Ranchers in Cherokee City are furious when trucking company owner Ross Lambert, who holds a monopoly in the area, doubles his rate to transport their cattle to market. Cattlemen's association president James Barrabee, a wishy-washy man who cannot stand up to the ruthless Lambert, relies on his foreman, Roy Rogers, for a solution. Roy realizes that their cattle can be shipped on steamboats, and convinces Barrabee to contact Colonel Silas Popen, the eccentric Southern owner of a steamboat line. Lambert, determined to protect his monopoly, steals a telegram addressed to Roy advising him that Popen hates all things western. Without this information Roy and his singing friends, The Sons of the Pioneers, make a bad first impression, and Popen's opinion of them is worsened by the antics of Roy's pals, "Gabby" Whittaker and Frog. In town, Lambert arranges for a rough-and-tumble saloon brawl to terrify Popen, and it succeeds when the noise scares the horses of Popen's wagon into running wild. Roy saves Popen, his daughter Mary Lou and his black valet, Rango, but upon reaching Barrabee's ranch, the Southerner declares that he will have nothing to do with shipping cattle. Roy angrily tells Popen what he thinks of him and accuses Mary Lou of being a quitter. Deciding to prove Roy wrong, Mary Lou takes matters into her own hands and arranges for the ranchers to round up their cattle and bring them to Barrabee's ranch. Lambert overhears Mary Lou telling Roy the plan, and sends some of his men to set Popen's boat on fire. While all of the ranch hands are putting out the fire, Lambert's men, led by Cully Bronson, rustle the cattle. Popen, who has fallen down a well at the ranch, overhears Lambert and Bronson discussing their deeds. Once Popen is rescued and his missing false teeth recovered, he reveals that the gang have taken the cattle beneath a waterfall to a swamp on the other side. The ranchers rush over, and while they are rounding up the gang, Roy rescues Mary Lou, who has been kidnapped by Lambert and Bronson. Lambert is brought to justice, and Popen signs a contract with Barrabee to transport the ranchers' cattle. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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