Reunion in France (1942)

101 mins | Romance | December 1942

Director:

Jules Dassin

Cinematographer:

Robert Planck

Editor:

Elmo Veron

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of the film was Reunion , the title under which it was copyrighted and under which trade publications reviewed it. According to a 14 Dec 1942 HR news item, the title was changed to Reunion in France and the release date was moved up to Christmas 1942 to capitalize on an increased "national interest" in recent events in France. Pre-production news items in HR noted that Paramount star Alan Ladd was originally sought for the film's "romantic" lead, presumably for the role taken over by John Wayne, and that Agnes Moorehead was being sought for an unspecified role. HR production charts include Keenan Wynn in the cast, but he was not in the released film. Hans Conried was mentioned in a 13 Jul 1942 HR news item as being cast in the film, but he was not in the released film. Other actors mentioned in various news items whose appearance in the film has not been confirmed include Christine Seward and Bert Hicks. The film marked the motion picture debut of Broadway actress Margaret Laurence and the first M-G-M assignment of costume designer Irene.
       The film was in release Dec 1942-Feb ... More Less

The working title of the film was Reunion , the title under which it was copyrighted and under which trade publications reviewed it. According to a 14 Dec 1942 HR news item, the title was changed to Reunion in France and the release date was moved up to Christmas 1942 to capitalize on an increased "national interest" in recent events in France. Pre-production news items in HR noted that Paramount star Alan Ladd was originally sought for the film's "romantic" lead, presumably for the role taken over by John Wayne, and that Agnes Moorehead was being sought for an unspecified role. HR production charts include Keenan Wynn in the cast, but he was not in the released film. Hans Conried was mentioned in a 13 Jul 1942 HR news item as being cast in the film, but he was not in the released film. Other actors mentioned in various news items whose appearance in the film has not been confirmed include Christine Seward and Bert Hicks. The film marked the motion picture debut of Broadway actress Margaret Laurence and the first M-G-M assignment of costume designer Irene.
       The film was in release Dec 1942-Feb 1943. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Dec 1942.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Dec 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 May 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 42
p. 4, 9
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 42
p. 8., 15566
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 42
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 42
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 42
p. 1.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Dec 42
p. 1041.
New York Times
5 Mar 43
p. 20.
Variety
2 Dec 42
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Oliver B. Prickett
Hans Furberg
Hans von Morhart
Major Fred Farrell
William Vaughn
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on the original story by
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
SOURCES
SONGS
"(I'll Be Glad When You're Dead) You Rascal You," music and lyrics by Charles Davenport.
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1942
Production Date:
30 June--9 September 1942
addl scenes comp 15 September 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 December 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11739
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
101
Length(in feet):
9,339
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
8877
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In the summer of 1939, Parisian socialite Michele de la Becque tries to encourage her lover, automotive designer Robert Cortot, to come with her to the South of France, but Robert refuses because of the war. The self-centered Michele does not understand and frivolously goes to her favorite couturier, Mme. Montanot, for a new wardrobe. As Michele leaves for her holiday, Robert tries to tell her how important France is to him and to make her understand what the war means, but she dismisses his words. Soon German forces cross France's seemingly impenetrable Maginot Line and Paris is occupied by the Nazis. Returning to Paris, Michele finally begins to realize the horrors of war. Her house is now occupied by the Nazis, but when she goes to Robert's, she is puzzled to find that his life has barely been affected by the war. That night, while they dine at an elegant hotel, Michele is revulsed to discover that Robert is a favorite of highly placed Nazis. When the concierge, Martin, an old friend, tells her of Robert's blatant collaboration, she refuses to occupy the luxurious room that Robert has arranged for her. After she leaves, Martin is arrested by Ulrich Windler, head of the Paris Gestapo. Back at Michele's house, in the small, exterior servant's quarters she now occupies, Robert is waiting and tries to reason with her, but she refuses his help and is disgusted by his pro-Nazi attitude. The next day she goes to Montanot to ask for a job. On the way home, she is accosted by a man who is running from the Nazis, downed RAF Eagle Squadron ... +


In the summer of 1939, Parisian socialite Michele de la Becque tries to encourage her lover, automotive designer Robert Cortot, to come with her to the South of France, but Robert refuses because of the war. The self-centered Michele does not understand and frivolously goes to her favorite couturier, Mme. Montanot, for a new wardrobe. As Michele leaves for her holiday, Robert tries to tell her how important France is to him and to make her understand what the war means, but she dismisses his words. Soon German forces cross France's seemingly impenetrable Maginot Line and Paris is occupied by the Nazis. Returning to Paris, Michele finally begins to realize the horrors of war. Her house is now occupied by the Nazis, but when she goes to Robert's, she is puzzled to find that his life has barely been affected by the war. That night, while they dine at an elegant hotel, Michele is revulsed to discover that Robert is a favorite of highly placed Nazis. When the concierge, Martin, an old friend, tells her of Robert's blatant collaboration, she refuses to occupy the luxurious room that Robert has arranged for her. After she leaves, Martin is arrested by Ulrich Windler, head of the Paris Gestapo. Back at Michele's house, in the small, exterior servant's quarters she now occupies, Robert is waiting and tries to reason with her, but she refuses his help and is disgusted by his pro-Nazi attitude. The next day she goes to Montanot to ask for a job. On the way home, she is accosted by a man who is running from the Nazis, downed RAF Eagle Squadron flyer Patrick Talbot, from Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. Although suspicious, she lets him in her room because they are being followed by Gestapo agent Stregel and French gendarme Durand. The next morning, after the exhausted Pat has had a good night's sleep, he offers to leave, but she tells him to stay and decides to help him. Unknown to her, the suspicious Stregel is still watching her place, and is relieved by an apparent superior, Herr Schultz. That day, the patriotic Montanot and her assistant Juliette agree to help Pat with money and forged papers. When Robert comes to the shop, he angrily warns Michele that her attitude will soon get her into trouble with the Nazis and begs her to let him help her to leave France. That night, as Michele and Pat flirt with each other, the German officer occupying her house drunkenly storms into her room. He exchanges barbs with Pat, who, as an American is not yet an enemy of Germany, but who incurs his wrath. To avoid a dangerous confrontation, Michele pretends she is attracted to the officer and distracts him until Juliette's boyfriend takes Pat safely away. Michele then goes to Robert to ask his help to leave France and says that she wants a car and would like to use an American student who has lost his papers as her chauffeur. He agrees to help and she promises to pretend to be his fiancée. One week later, Pat, who now poses as Michele's chauffeur, thinks that the reason she quit her job and now socializes with the Nazis she hates, is that she loves him and is trying to save him. When Schultz sees them talking in a familiar way, he secretly tells Robert. At a Parisian nightclub, Michele tries to charm Windler and General Hugo Schroeder, the prefect of Paris, but Windler is suspicious of her. Meanwhile, in a small hotel, two men tell Schultz that a photo of Pat confirms that he is the missing RAF flier and say that they must work quickly. Soon Honore, Robert's butler, brings Michele her papers, saying that she must leave immediately. Robert then comes to her, and after tenderly saying that he loves her and France more than ever, sends her away with Schultz. She is certain that Robert has betrayed her when she is put into a car with two men in Nazi uniforms. When they then drive to pick up Pat, he is put into another car, and she assumes that he is now a prisoner. The two cars arrive at a checkpoint at the same time and Michele realizes that Schultz and the other two "Nazis" are really British agents. The two cars speed off after Schultz creates a diversion. As the Nazis from the checkpoint chase the car in which Michele and Schultz are riding, he is mortally wounded, just before killing the pursuing Nazi commandant. Before sending Michele off toward a secret airfield, Schultz, whose real name is Pinkum, reveals that Robert is really a leader in the French underground. At the airfield, Pat and the others are waiting for a plane to take them to England. When it lands, Michele thinks about what Pinkum had told her about Robert. The next morning, in Paris, Schroeder and Windler arrive at Robert's house with news of Pat's escape and are about to arrest him for arranging it when Michele arrives. This is evidence enough to convince Schroeder that Robert is blameless and he and Windler leave. Waiting in the doorway as Schroeder and Windler drive off, Michele and Robert are hurt when some small children angrily call them traitors, but take courage from the knowledge that their cause is just. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.