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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Paradise Lost , Paradise Lost, 1948 , Paradise Lost, 1949 and Fox in Chains . According to a NYT news item, the film was shot on location in Italy, in the cities of Rome, Naples and Siena. Portions of the film were shot at the seventeenth century villa belonging to Count Ranuccio Bianchi-Bandinelli, a prominent Italian political figure, who reportedly met the filmmakers and offered them the use of his home just outside Siena. The NYT article also states that only two Universal contract players--Jeff Chandler and Marta Toren--were used in the film, as producer-writer Robert Buckner cast the remaining roles in Rome. Contemporary sources vary greatly on the spelling of the Italian actors' names. According to HR news items, Dana Andrews was originally considered for the role of "Vic Smith," which was played in the film by Chandler. According to the NYT , the film's budget was drastically cut by the use of Italian cast and crew members, whose salaries were a fraction of their American counterparts. The DV review pointed out the similarity between Jeff Chandler's character "Vic Smith" and Charles "Lucky" Luciano, the noted Italian-American Mafia chief who was deported from the United States to his native Italy in ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Paradise Lost , Paradise Lost, 1948 , Paradise Lost, 1949 and Fox in Chains . According to a NYT news item, the film was shot on location in Italy, in the cities of Rome, Naples and Siena. Portions of the film were shot at the seventeenth century villa belonging to Count Ranuccio Bianchi-Bandinelli, a prominent Italian political figure, who reportedly met the filmmakers and offered them the use of his home just outside Siena. The NYT article also states that only two Universal contract players--Jeff Chandler and Marta Toren--were used in the film, as producer-writer Robert Buckner cast the remaining roles in Rome. Contemporary sources vary greatly on the spelling of the Italian actors' names. According to HR news items, Dana Andrews was originally considered for the role of "Vic Smith," which was played in the film by Chandler. According to the NYT , the film's budget was drastically cut by the use of Italian cast and crew members, whose salaries were a fraction of their American counterparts. The DV review pointed out the similarity between Jeff Chandler's character "Vic Smith" and Charles "Lucky" Luciano, the noted Italian-American Mafia chief who was deported from the United States to his native Italy in 1946. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Jan 50
pp. 10-11, 20.
Box Office
28 Oct 1950.
---
Daily Variety
18 Oct 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Oct 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 48
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Nov 48
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Dec 48
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 49
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 49
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 49
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 50
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Oct 51
p. 537.
New York Times
6 Nov 1949.
---
New York Times
2 Nov 50
p. 39.
Variety
18 Oct 50
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Toren's gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Paradise Lost
Paradise lost a
Paradise lost aa
Release Date:
October 1950
Production Date:
late September--late November 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
16 November 1950
Copyright Number:
LP533
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
88-89
Length(in feet):
7,966
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14339
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Gangster Vic Smith is deported from the United States to Italy, where he was born under the name Vittorio Mario Sparducci. After arriving by ship in Naples, Vic is met by Vito Bucelli, an Italian policeman, who informs the gangster that he must leave that afternoon for his home town of Marbella, where he is required to remain for the next thirty days. As he enters a taxicab, Vic meets Gina Carapia, a beautiful young woman who lures him into a trap set by his old henchman, Bernardo Gervaso. Gervaso demands his "cut" of the $100,000 Vic was convicted of stealing, but Vic insists that he left the money behind in America, and, having served five years in prison as well as being deported for the theft, feels he is entitled to the entire sum. Vic then beats up Gervaso and orders him to stay away. In Marbella, Vic is treated to a hero's welcome, as the townspeople are under the impression that he is a "local boy who made good," and is returning to Italy after completing a mysterious government mission. His uncle, Armando, goes so far as to insist that Vic come to live with him and his family. Soon thereafter, Vic becomes involved with Countess Christine di Lorenzi, a wealthy widow who is responsible for the distribution of American relief supplies to the town's poor. Vic then hatches a plan with Guido Caruso, the head of the local black market, to use his hidden money in America to buy massive amounts of relief supplies, then hijack the shipment and sell the much-needed food and medicine on the black market. ... +


Gangster Vic Smith is deported from the United States to Italy, where he was born under the name Vittorio Mario Sparducci. After arriving by ship in Naples, Vic is met by Vito Bucelli, an Italian policeman, who informs the gangster that he must leave that afternoon for his home town of Marbella, where he is required to remain for the next thirty days. As he enters a taxicab, Vic meets Gina Carapia, a beautiful young woman who lures him into a trap set by his old henchman, Bernardo Gervaso. Gervaso demands his "cut" of the $100,000 Vic was convicted of stealing, but Vic insists that he left the money behind in America, and, having served five years in prison as well as being deported for the theft, feels he is entitled to the entire sum. Vic then beats up Gervaso and orders him to stay away. In Marbella, Vic is treated to a hero's welcome, as the townspeople are under the impression that he is a "local boy who made good," and is returning to Italy after completing a mysterious government mission. His uncle, Armando, goes so far as to insist that Vic come to live with him and his family. Soon thereafter, Vic becomes involved with Countess Christine di Lorenzi, a wealthy widow who is responsible for the distribution of American relief supplies to the town's poor. Vic then hatches a plan with Guido Caruso, the head of the local black market, to use his hidden money in America to buy massive amounts of relief supplies, then hijack the shipment and sell the much-needed food and medicine on the black market. When the relief supplies arrive, a great festival is held, and Christine tells the townspeople that Vic is their benefactor. Despite feeling pangs of guilt, Vic still plans to steal the relief supplies until the unexpected appearance of Bucelli, who has come to Marbella to check up on Vic. Afraid that the policeman will rightfully blame him for the hijacking, Vic insists that Caruso call off the heist, but the black marketeer insists on going ahead with the plan. As Caruso and his men enter the warehouse holding the relief materials, Vic is waiting for them and quickly captures Caruso, only to be captured himself by Gervaso, who has recently joined Caruso's gang. Vic is saved, however, by the arrival of Bucelli and the police, who capture Caruso and his gang after a fierce battle. Gervaso is then killed while fighting with Vic after he accidentally overturns a pile of packing cases on top of himself. The next morning, Vic and Bucelli head for the railroad station, as Vic has been summoned to Rome to explain his involvement with Caruso. Christine joins them on board the train, announcing that she is in love with Vic, and despite knowing all about his past, is willing to stand by him in court. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.