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HISTORY

The 23 Sep 1925 FD announced Beverly of Graustark as one of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.’s (M-G-M) fall 1925 productions. Marion Davis was set to star, with Sidney Franklin as director and Irving Thalberg serving as supervising producer. The story was based on the 1904 novel of the same name by George Barr McCutcheon.
       The 3 Oct 1925 Moving Picture World listed the producer as Cosmopolitan Productions, and reported that filming would take place at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA.
       According to the 29 Nov 1925 FD, Davies and company had returned to M-G-M Studios the day before, following the start of production on location in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California.
       The Dec 1925 AmCin noted that an elaborate castle had been constructed on set, and named Ira H. Morgan as the chief cinematographer. The 19 Dec 1925 Moving Picture World stated that George K. Arthur was portraying “Prince Oscar,” but the same day’s Motion Picture News reported that Creighton Hale was taking over his role, as Arthur was busy completing another production.
       On 3 Jan 1926, FD announced that filming had been halted for ten days, due to Marion Davies’s suffering from influenza. According to the 14 Feb 1926 issue, filming had recently completed, and the picture was currently in the cutting room.
       The 16 Apr 1926 FD reported that the film would open in New York City at the Capitol Theatre on 18 Apr 1926. Reviews in the 21 Apr 1926 Var and the 2 May 1926 FD had mixed reactions to Marion ... More Less

The 23 Sep 1925 FD announced Beverly of Graustark as one of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.’s (M-G-M) fall 1925 productions. Marion Davis was set to star, with Sidney Franklin as director and Irving Thalberg serving as supervising producer. The story was based on the 1904 novel of the same name by George Barr McCutcheon.
       The 3 Oct 1925 Moving Picture World listed the producer as Cosmopolitan Productions, and reported that filming would take place at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA.
       According to the 29 Nov 1925 FD, Davies and company had returned to M-G-M Studios the day before, following the start of production on location in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California.
       The Dec 1925 AmCin noted that an elaborate castle had been constructed on set, and named Ira H. Morgan as the chief cinematographer. The 19 Dec 1925 Moving Picture World stated that George K. Arthur was portraying “Prince Oscar,” but the same day’s Motion Picture News reported that Creighton Hale was taking over his role, as Arthur was busy completing another production.
       On 3 Jan 1926, FD announced that filming had been halted for ten days, due to Marion Davies’s suffering from influenza. According to the 14 Feb 1926 issue, filming had recently completed, and the picture was currently in the cutting room.
       The 16 Apr 1926 FD reported that the film would open in New York City at the Capitol Theatre on 18 Apr 1926. Reviews in the 21 Apr 1926 Var and the 2 May 1926 FD had mixed reactions to Marion Davies’s portrayal of a girl pretending to be a boy. Var deemed her too feminine to be convincing, while FD praised her “likable” portrayal. The picture was described as “enjoyable” and “entertaining” in both reviews.
       The final sequence of the film was in two-strip Technicolor. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Dec 1925
pp. 23-24.
Film Daily
23 Sep 1925
p. 10.
Film Daily
29 Nov 1925
p. 2.
Film Daily
3 Jan 1926
p. 9.
Film Daily
14 Feb 1926
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Apr 1926
p. 4.
Film Daily
2 May 1926
p. 6.
Motion Picture News
19 Dec 1925
p. 3004.
Moving Picture World
3 Oct 1925
p. 417.
Moving Picture World
19 Dec 1925
p. 650.
New York Times
19 Apr 1926
p. 24.
Variety
21 Apr 1926
p. 34.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Beverly of Graustark by George Barr McCutcheon (New York, 1904).
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 March 1926
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 April 1926
Production Date:
late November 1925--mid February 1926
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Copyright Date:
5 April 1926
Copyright Number:
LP22562
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black & white with color sequences
Length(in feet):
6,710 , 6,977
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Beverly Calhoun, discovering that her Cousin Oscar is the heir to the throne of Graustark, a European kingdom, joins him there. They are met by the Duke Travina, the temporary regent. General Marlanx, pretender to the throne, learning of the young prince's arrival, plots with Saranoff to assassinate him. In the Alps, Oscar is injured while skiing, and the duke suggests that Beverly wear Oscar's uniform and impersonate him until he recovers; Saranoff's plot is thwarted by Danton, leader of a group of shepherds. Danton becomes her constant companion and guard, and she obtains women's clothing to charm him. Confusing her as a rival to the "prince," Danton jealously challenges the prince to a duel. Oscar reveals the impersonation to Marlanx, but Danton, acknowledging himself to be the prince of a nearby kingdom, exposes the pretender's plot and wins the hand of ... +


Beverly Calhoun, discovering that her Cousin Oscar is the heir to the throne of Graustark, a European kingdom, joins him there. They are met by the Duke Travina, the temporary regent. General Marlanx, pretender to the throne, learning of the young prince's arrival, plots with Saranoff to assassinate him. In the Alps, Oscar is injured while skiing, and the duke suggests that Beverly wear Oscar's uniform and impersonate him until he recovers; Saranoff's plot is thwarted by Danton, leader of a group of shepherds. Danton becomes her constant companion and guard, and she obtains women's clothing to charm him. Confusing her as a rival to the "prince," Danton jealously challenges the prince to a duel. Oscar reveals the impersonation to Marlanx, but Danton, acknowledging himself to be the prince of a nearby kingdom, exposes the pretender's plot and wins the hand of Beverly. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.