Blood and Sand (1922)

Drama | 10 September 1922

Director:

Fred Niblo

Writer:

June Mathis

Cinematographer:

Alvin Wyckoff

Production Company:

Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
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HISTORY

Beginning title cards introduce the story: “The wide world over, cruelty is disguised as sport to gratify man's lust for excitement. From the early ages, humanity has congregated to watch the combating forces of man and beast. To the Spaniard, the love of the bull-fight is inborn. A heritage of barbarism--its heroes embody the bravery of the knights of old. Our story is of a toreador--a son of the people, who becomes its idol--and sunny Seville is his birthplace.”
       Novelist Ibáñez is given an opening credit: “in Vicente Blasco Ibáñez' Blood and Sand.”
       In an alternate version, Juan recovers and gives up both bullfighting and Doña Sol for good.
       The 13 Jan 1922 Var announced that Rudolph Valentino signed a three-year contract “to become a Paramount star.” His first film under this arrangement was Blood and Sand. Bebe Daniels and May McAvoy were signed to play “Doña Sol” and “Carmen,” respectively, but neither appeared in the final production. The 7 Mar 1922 FD reported that producers decided McAvoy “was not quite suited to the type,” and replaced her with Lila Lee. John S. Robertson was originally scheduled to direct, according to the 21 Jan 1922 FD, but he was replaced by Fred Niblo.
       The 10 Jan 1922 FD noted that Blood and Sand was “going into production shortly in Hollywood.” The 6 May 1922 FD reported that Nita Naldi had “completed work” on the picture, and a 17 Jun 1922 ^Exhibitors Trade Review item mentioned that Lila Lee had finished the movie.
       At a pre-release opening in downtown Los Angeles, CA, on ... More Less

Beginning title cards introduce the story: “The wide world over, cruelty is disguised as sport to gratify man's lust for excitement. From the early ages, humanity has congregated to watch the combating forces of man and beast. To the Spaniard, the love of the bull-fight is inborn. A heritage of barbarism--its heroes embody the bravery of the knights of old. Our story is of a toreador--a son of the people, who becomes its idol--and sunny Seville is his birthplace.”
       Novelist Ibáñez is given an opening credit: “in Vicente Blasco Ibáñez' Blood and Sand.”
       In an alternate version, Juan recovers and gives up both bullfighting and Doña Sol for good.
       The 13 Jan 1922 Var announced that Rudolph Valentino signed a three-year contract “to become a Paramount star.” His first film under this arrangement was Blood and Sand. Bebe Daniels and May McAvoy were signed to play “Doña Sol” and “Carmen,” respectively, but neither appeared in the final production. The 7 Mar 1922 FD reported that producers decided McAvoy “was not quite suited to the type,” and replaced her with Lila Lee. John S. Robertson was originally scheduled to direct, according to the 21 Jan 1922 FD, but he was replaced by Fred Niblo.
       The 10 Jan 1922 FD noted that Blood and Sand was “going into production shortly in Hollywood.” The 6 May 1922 FD reported that Nita Naldi had “completed work” on the picture, and a 17 Jun 1922 ^Exhibitors Trade Review item mentioned that Lila Lee had finished the movie.
       At a pre-release opening in downtown Los Angeles, CA, on 6 Aug 1922, Blood and Sand “broke all records for attendance at the Rialto Sunday,” Jesse L. Lasky telegrammed his boss, Adolph Zukor, in New York, according to the 12 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review. “Line of people one block long in front of theater from 11 in the morning until 10 at night.” Local newspapers described the film as “a masterpiece” and “a triumph.” The 19 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review deemed the film a “well deserved triumph for the star, Rudolph Valentino,” who at the time was cinema’s number-one matinee idol. When the film opened the following day, on 7 Aug, at the Rivoli in New York, the paid attendance was 8,587, “the biggest Monday in history,” the 19 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review announced. By the following week, attendance totaled 62,334, with a box office take of $35,085, the 26 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review reported.
       Music publisher Waterson, Berlin & Snyder, Inc. dedicated a Harry B. Smith-Ted Snyder song, “You Gave Me Your Heart (So I Gave You Mine),” to Blood and Sand, according to the 2 Sep 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review. The cover of the sheet music featured a still from the film, and “professional copies are now in the hands of the singers and the song already has made a hit in New York.” Smith and Snyder had previously written "Sheik of Araby," a hit song inspired by the success of Rudolph Valentino's The Sheik (1921, see entry).
       The 11 Nov 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Stan Laurel's newest film comedy was Mud and Sand, in which he portrayed “Rhubarb Vaselino.” Other characters were “Filet of Sole” and “Cuspidor.”
       Film Year Book 1922-1923 called Blood and Sand one of “The Ten Best” pictures of 1922.
       Another film adaptation of Vicente Blasco-Ibáñez's novel (but not Tom Cushing’s play) was produced by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1941, directed by Rouben Mamoulian and starring Tyrone Power, Lynda Darnell, and Rita Hayworth (see entry).
       Blood and Sand is available on YouTube in 2016. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Jun 1922
p. 151.
Exhibitors Trade Review
12 Aug 1922
p. 748.
Exhibitors Trade Review
19 Aug 1922
pp. 785 and 819.
Exhibitors Trade Review
26 Aug 1922
p. 841.
Exhibitors Trade Review
2 Sep 1922
p. 910.
Exhibitors Trade Review
11 Nov 1922
p. 1523.
Film Daily
10 Jan 1922
p. 1.
Film Daily
21 Jan 1922
p. 1.
Film Daily
7 Mar 1922
p. 4.
Film Daily
6 May 1922
p. 2.
Film Year Book
1922-1923
p. 349.
New York Times
7 Aug 27
p. 14.
Photoplay
1 Oct 22
p. 58.
Variety
13 Jan 1922
p. 47.
Variety
11 Aug 22
pp. 32 & 33.
Variety
25 Aug 1922
p. 34.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Jesse L. Lasky presents
A Fred Niblo Production
A Paramount Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
Wrt for the screen by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Sangre y arena by Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, (Madrid, 1908) and the play Blood and Sand by Tom Cushing (New York, 20 Sep 1921).
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 September 1922
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 6 August 1922
Los Angeles and New York openings: 7 August 1922
Production Date:
finished June 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 August 1922
Copyright Number:
LP18230
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black & white with color sequences
Length(in feet):
8,110
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the de la Feria suburb of Seville, Spain, Juan Gallardo, a poor son of a deceased shoemaker, becomes a matador and marries Carmen, his childhood sweetheart. While achieving fame throughout the country, nicknamed “Zapaterin,” or “Little Shoemaker,” he is caught up in the shady business of bullfighting. Despite his happiness with Carmen, Juan succumbs to the passionate charms of Doña Sol. Carmen accepts the situation, and hurries to nurse Juan when he is gored. Although his skill has diminished, Juan refuses her pleas that he quit the bullring, and meets disaster when, distracted by the sight of a handsome young stranger with Doña Sol in the stands, he fails to defend himself from the first charge of the bull. Assuring Carmen that she has always had his love, Juan dies in her arms. The crowd roars as the slain bull is dragged off, and an observer remarks that the real beast "with 10,000 heads" is in the ... +


In the de la Feria suburb of Seville, Spain, Juan Gallardo, a poor son of a deceased shoemaker, becomes a matador and marries Carmen, his childhood sweetheart. While achieving fame throughout the country, nicknamed “Zapaterin,” or “Little Shoemaker,” he is caught up in the shady business of bullfighting. Despite his happiness with Carmen, Juan succumbs to the passionate charms of Doña Sol. Carmen accepts the situation, and hurries to nurse Juan when he is gored. Although his skill has diminished, Juan refuses her pleas that he quit the bullring, and meets disaster when, distracted by the sight of a handsome young stranger with Doña Sol in the stands, he fails to defend himself from the first charge of the bull. Assuring Carmen that she has always had his love, Juan dies in her arms. The crowd roars as the slain bull is dragged off, and an observer remarks that the real beast "with 10,000 heads" is in the stands. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Sports


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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