The Bright Shawl (1923)

Melodrama | 22 April 1923

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HISTORY

The 9 Nov 1922 FD announced plans to make a film version of The Bright Shawl, the latest novel by author Joseph Hergesheimer. An advertisement in the 30 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Herald declared it to be the first directorial effort by John S. Robertson under his new contract with Inspiration Pictures, Inc. On 29 Nov 1922, FD reported that the cast and crew had sailed to Cuba to begin three weeks of principal photography. Robertson and art director Everett Shinn, who also illustrated the source novel, sailed the previous day. The 1 Dec 1922 FD incorrectly stated that Henry King would direct. On 29 Dec 1922, FD reported the completion of location filming. Interior photography proceeded at Tilford Studios in New York City, as noted in the 20 Jan 1923 Motion Picture News. According to the 10 Mar 1923 Motion Picture News, production ended more than one month later. On 14 Apr 1923, FD announced that Oscar C. Buchheister had finished titling the film. The Feb-Jul 1923 Motion Picture stated that lead actor Richard Barthelmess performed his own fencing in the picture, and practiced between scenes with his coach. John Robertson cast a hunchbacked “beggar” while on location in Cuba. The man arrived on set the next day, elegantly dressed and demanding an exorbitant salary. A deal was reached and the beggar appeared on screen looking suitably impoverished. A news brief noted that actress Dorothy Gish appeared in the film as the Spanish dancer “La Clavel,” ... More Less

The 9 Nov 1922 FD announced plans to make a film version of The Bright Shawl, the latest novel by author Joseph Hergesheimer. An advertisement in the 30 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Herald declared it to be the first directorial effort by John S. Robertson under his new contract with Inspiration Pictures, Inc. On 29 Nov 1922, FD reported that the cast and crew had sailed to Cuba to begin three weeks of principal photography. Robertson and art director Everett Shinn, who also illustrated the source novel, sailed the previous day. The 1 Dec 1922 FD incorrectly stated that Henry King would direct. On 29 Dec 1922, FD reported the completion of location filming. Interior photography proceeded at Tilford Studios in New York City, as noted in the 20 Jan 1923 Motion Picture News. According to the 10 Mar 1923 Motion Picture News, production ended more than one month later. On 14 Apr 1923, FD announced that Oscar C. Buchheister had finished titling the film. The Feb-Jul 1923 Motion Picture stated that lead actor Richard Barthelmess performed his own fencing in the picture, and practiced between scenes with his coach. John Robertson cast a hunchbacked “beggar” while on location in Cuba. The man arrived on set the next day, elegantly dressed and demanding an exorbitant salary. A deal was reached and the beggar appeared on screen looking suitably impoverished. A news brief noted that actress Dorothy Gish appeared in the film as the Spanish dancer “La Clavel,” a departure from her usual “flapper” roles. However, the Mar-Aug 1923 Picture-Play revealed that Barthelmess believed stage actress Alla Nazimova was better suited to the character.
       The 7 Apr 1923 Motion Picture News announced the release of a press book by distributor First National Pictures, featuring an illustration of Barthelmess by artist Franklin Booth. The drawing was also used in First National’s advertising campaign. A preview screening was held 2 Apr 1923 at the Rialto Theatre in South Norwalk, CT. Three weeks later, the 28 Apr 1923 Motion Picture News reported the 22 Apr 1923 premiere at the Strand Theatre in New York City. Reviews were mixed, with some critics believing the screenplay was unworthy of the cast. The film marked the first major screen role for Dutch actress Jetta Goudal.
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
30 Dec 1922
p. 82, 102.
Exhibitors Herald
13 Jan 1923
p. 61.
Exhibitors Herald
5 May 1923
p. 52.
Exhibitors Trade Review
5 May 1923
p. 1153.
Film Daily
9 Nov 1922
p. 2.
Film Daily
23 Nov 1922
p. 2.
Film Daily
29 Nov 1922
p. 2.
Film Daily
1 Dec 1922
p. 5.
Film Daily
29 Dec 1922
p. 1.
Film Daily
11 Mar 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
14 Apr 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
24 Apr 1923
p. 4.
Motion Picture
Feb-Jul 1923
p. 48, 80, 117.
Motion Picture News
20 Jan 1923
p. 371.
Motion Picture News
10 Mar 1923
p. 1167.
Motion Picture News
7 Apr 1923
p. 1669, 1702.
Motion Picture News
28 Apr 1923
p. 2036.
Moving Picture World
5 May 1923
p. 16.
Picture-Play
Mar-Aug 1923
p. 58, 80.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Bright Shawl by Joseph Hergesheimer (New York, 1922).
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 April 1923
Premiere Information:
New York City premier: 22 Apr 1923
Production Date:
Dec 1922--Feb 1923
Copyright Claimant:
Inspiration Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 April 1923
Copyright Number:
LP18873
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,503
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Charles Abbot, a wealthy young American, goes to Cuba with his friend Andrés Escobar to help the cause of Cuban independence. He falls in love with Andrés' sister, Narcissa, although he spends more time with Spanish dancer La Clavel, who is in love with Charles and gives him information she garners from Spanish officers. La Pilar, a Spanish spy, discovers their scheme and sets a trap for them and the entire Escobar family. La Clavel gives her life to save Charles, but it is a chivalrous whim by a Spanish officer that enables Charles, Narcissa, and Narcissa's mother, Carmenita, to escape to the United ... +


Charles Abbot, a wealthy young American, goes to Cuba with his friend Andrés Escobar to help the cause of Cuban independence. He falls in love with Andrés' sister, Narcissa, although he spends more time with Spanish dancer La Clavel, who is in love with Charles and gives him information she garners from Spanish officers. La Pilar, a Spanish spy, discovers their scheme and sets a trap for them and the entire Escobar family. La Clavel gives her life to save Charles, but it is a chivalrous whim by a Spanish officer that enables Charles, Narcissa, and Narcissa's mother, Carmenita, to escape to the United States. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Historical


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.