The Katzenjammer Kids in School (1898)

Comedy, Children's works | July 1898

Production Company:

American Mutoscope Co.
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HISTORY

The Biograph catalog summarized this film as follows: “The interior of a country school is shown. The teacher has stepped out for a moment, and all the youngsters are carrying on. Two wicked little urchins tie a string across the aisle where the teacher is expected to pass, and when she comes in she falls over it. The children are in great glee over her misfortune, and make a bad matter worse by pelting her with their school books.”
       The U.S. Library of Congress catalog, using the title Katzenjammer Kids and the School Marm, gives the following description: "The film starts on a set of a school room where ten boys and girls are sitting at desks. Their teacher gestures that she plans to leave the room and that the children should study. She goes out and, instead of studying, the youngsters throw books and erasers at one another. This continues until the teacher returns and, while she is admonishing them for their obstreperousness, she trips over a chair and falls to the floor."
       This movie was filmed at American Mutoscope’s rooftop studio at 841 Broadway in New York City.
       See also The Katzenjammer Kids Have a Love Affair (1900) and Katzenjammer Kids (Journal Thumb Book) (1903).
       The American Mutoscope Company was co-founded in Dec 1895 by former Edison Manufacturing Company inventor William K. L. Dickson (who left Edison in Apr of that year), fellow inventors Herman Casler and Harry Marvin, and businessman Elias Koopman. Their Mutoscope, which originally made flip-card peep show movies, soon rivaled Thomas Edison’s Kinetoscope (see Edison Kinetoscopic Records for 1893). In the summer of ... More Less

The Biograph catalog summarized this film as follows: “The interior of a country school is shown. The teacher has stepped out for a moment, and all the youngsters are carrying on. Two wicked little urchins tie a string across the aisle where the teacher is expected to pass, and when she comes in she falls over it. The children are in great glee over her misfortune, and make a bad matter worse by pelting her with their school books.”
       The U.S. Library of Congress catalog, using the title Katzenjammer Kids and the School Marm, gives the following description: "The film starts on a set of a school room where ten boys and girls are sitting at desks. Their teacher gestures that she plans to leave the room and that the children should study. She goes out and, instead of studying, the youngsters throw books and erasers at one another. This continues until the teacher returns and, while she is admonishing them for their obstreperousness, she trips over a chair and falls to the floor."
       This movie was filmed at American Mutoscope’s rooftop studio at 841 Broadway in New York City.
       See also The Katzenjammer Kids Have a Love Affair (1900) and Katzenjammer Kids (Journal Thumb Book) (1903).
       The American Mutoscope Company was co-founded in Dec 1895 by former Edison Manufacturing Company inventor William K. L. Dickson (who left Edison in Apr of that year), fellow inventors Herman Casler and Harry Marvin, and businessman Elias Koopman. Their Mutoscope, which originally made flip-card peep show movies, soon rivaled Thomas Edison’s Kinetoscope (see Edison Kinetoscopic Records for 1893). In the summer of 1896, when Edison introduced the Vitascope 35mm projector, American Mutoscope immediately came out with its own 68mm projector that offered a superior image. In 1899, the company changed its name to the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, then shortened it nine years later to the Biograph Company. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
AMB Picture Catalogue
Nov 1902
p. 217.
EMP
p. 173.
LCMP
p. 31, column 2.
LCPP
p. 56.
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters in the New York Journal comic strip, “ The Katzenjammer Kids” (1897), by Rudolph Dirks.
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Katzenjammer Kids and the School Marm
Release Date:
July 1898
Copyright Claimant:
American Mutoscope and Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
18 July 1903
Copyright Number:
H33542
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
27 , 147
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When a country schoolteacher steps out the classroom for a moment, two urchins tie a string across the aisle. She returns to the room, trips over the string, and falls on the floor. The children throw their schoolbooks at ... +


When a country schoolteacher steps out the classroom for a moment, two urchins tie a string across the aisle. She returns to the room, trips over the string, and falls on the floor. The children throw their schoolbooks at her. +

GENRE


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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