Director:

Frank Borzage

Cinematographer:

Chester Lyons

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, James Basevi

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The 28 Feb 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Frank Borzage would direct the forthcoming adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham’s 1921 play, The Circle, for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M). The picture was billed as one of M-G-M’s “Quality 52” releases for the 1925-26 season, according to the 23 May 1925 Moving Picture World.
       The 11 Mar 1925 Var announced that filming would begin that week at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA. Two months later, the 9 May 1925 Motion Picture News indicated that production was still underway.
       On 15 Aug 1925, Motion Picture News reported that Borzage was “completing” the film.
       The Circle opened at the Capitol Theatre in New York City the week of 20 Sep 1925, according to the 23 Sep 1925 Var review. The performance of Eugenie Besserer was praised, but the picture received a tepid response. Borzage was reportedly forced to change the ending of the original play, in which the heroine leaves her husband for her lover, to appeal to censors.
       Another adaptation of the W. Somerset Maugham play was produced by M-G-M in 1930, under the title Strictly Unconventional. That film was directed by David Burton and starred Catherine Dale Owen and Paul Cavanagh (see ... More Less

The 28 Feb 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Frank Borzage would direct the forthcoming adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham’s 1921 play, The Circle, for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M). The picture was billed as one of M-G-M’s “Quality 52” releases for the 1925-26 season, according to the 23 May 1925 Moving Picture World.
       The 11 Mar 1925 Var announced that filming would begin that week at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA. Two months later, the 9 May 1925 Motion Picture News indicated that production was still underway.
       On 15 Aug 1925, Motion Picture News reported that Borzage was “completing” the film.
       The Circle opened at the Capitol Theatre in New York City the week of 20 Sep 1925, according to the 23 Sep 1925 Var review. The performance of Eugenie Besserer was praised, but the picture received a tepid response. Borzage was reportedly forced to change the ending of the original play, in which the heroine leaves her husband for her lover, to appeal to censors.
       Another adaptation of the W. Somerset Maugham play was produced by M-G-M in 1930, under the title Strictly Unconventional. That film was directed by David Burton and starred Catherine Dale Owen and Paul Cavanagh (see entry). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Feb 1925
p. 27.
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 Oct 1925
p. 24.
Film Daily
4 Oct 1925.
---
Motion Picture News
9 May 1925
p. 2055.
Motion Picture News
15 Aug 1925
p. 791.
Moving Picture World
23 May 1925
p. 452.
New York Times
22 Sep 1925
p. 22.
Variety
11 Mar 1925
p. 38.
Variety
23 Sep 1925
p. 39.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
COSTUMES
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Circle by W. Somerset Maugham (London, 3 Mar 1921).
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 20 September 1925
Production Date:
began mid March 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Copyright Date:
14 September 1925
Copyright Number:
LP21825
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,511
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the waning years of the last century, Hugh Portenous, who was to have been the best man at the wedding of Lady Catherine to Lord Cheney, persuades Catherine to elope with him instead. Thirty years pass. Elizabeth, the wife of Lady Catherine's son, Arnold, invites Hugh and Catherine to the country for a visit. Elizabeth is thinking of running off with Edward Lutton and wants to see how well the marriage of her husband's parents has survived the years; what she sees drives her to elope with Lutton. Her husband impersonates the chauffeur, drives the couple to a secluded spot, and thrashes Lutton. He and Elizabeth then return home, resuming married life with a new ... +


In the waning years of the last century, Hugh Portenous, who was to have been the best man at the wedding of Lady Catherine to Lord Cheney, persuades Catherine to elope with him instead. Thirty years pass. Elizabeth, the wife of Lady Catherine's son, Arnold, invites Hugh and Catherine to the country for a visit. Elizabeth is thinking of running off with Edward Lutton and wants to see how well the marriage of her husband's parents has survived the years; what she sees drives her to elope with Lutton. Her husband impersonates the chauffeur, drives the couple to a secluded spot, and thrashes Lutton. He and Elizabeth then return home, resuming married life with a new understanding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.