A Calamitous Elopement: How It Proved a Windfall for Burglar Bill (1908)

Romantic comedy | 7 August 1908

Full page view
HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog, using the title A Calamitous Elopement, gives the following description: “The theme of this film is the troubles of an eloping couple. The first scene takes place in a living room and the camera is then shifted to show the exterior, complete with second-story balcony. While the hero seeks a ladder, a nondescript character with a rope ladder appears, apparently with the intention of burglarizing the house. Hie hides and sees the luggage come hurtling over the banister. A policeman comes along and, misunderstanding the situation, takes the lovers off to the police station, leaving their luggage attended only by the burglar. The young couple, freed by the magistrate, go to their apartment, unlock their luggage and leave. The burglar, who had hidden in their trunk, lets himself out, helps himself to clothing and everything else of value, and walks out the door smoking a cigar. One of the two policemen in the film is D. W. Griffith and the police precinct is the front door of the Biograph Studio at 11 East Fourteenth Street, New York.”
       This film was shot at the Biograph Studio in New York City.
       The American Mutoscope Company was co-founded in Dec 1895 by former Edison Manufacturing Company inventor William K. L. Dickson (who left Edison in Apr of that year), fellow inventors Herman Casler and Harry Marvin, and businessman Elias Koopman. Their Mutoscope, which originally made flip-card peep show movies, soon rivaled Thomas Edison’s Kinetoscope (see Edison Kinetoscopic Records for 1893). In the summer of 1896, when Edison introduced the Vitascope 35mm projector, American Mutoscope immediately came out with its own 68mm ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog, using the title A Calamitous Elopement, gives the following description: “The theme of this film is the troubles of an eloping couple. The first scene takes place in a living room and the camera is then shifted to show the exterior, complete with second-story balcony. While the hero seeks a ladder, a nondescript character with a rope ladder appears, apparently with the intention of burglarizing the house. Hie hides and sees the luggage come hurtling over the banister. A policeman comes along and, misunderstanding the situation, takes the lovers off to the police station, leaving their luggage attended only by the burglar. The young couple, freed by the magistrate, go to their apartment, unlock their luggage and leave. The burglar, who had hidden in their trunk, lets himself out, helps himself to clothing and everything else of value, and walks out the door smoking a cigar. One of the two policemen in the film is D. W. Griffith and the police precinct is the front door of the Biograph Studio at 11 East Fourteenth Street, New York.”
       This film was shot at the Biograph Studio in New York City.
       The American Mutoscope Company was co-founded in Dec 1895 by former Edison Manufacturing Company inventor William K. L. Dickson (who left Edison in Apr of that year), fellow inventors Herman Casler and Harry Marvin, and businessman Elias Koopman. Their Mutoscope, which originally made flip-card peep show movies, soon rivaled Thomas Edison’s Kinetoscope (see Edison Kinetoscopic Records for 1893). In the summer of 1896, when Edison introduced the Vitascope 35mm projector, American Mutoscope immediately came out with its own 68mm projector that offered a superior image. In 1899, the company changed its name to the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, then shortened it nine years later to the Biograph Company.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB1
p. 374, 426.
BIOB2
p. 8.
BPL
pp. 104-105.
EMP
pp. 43-44.
LCMP
p. 11, column 3.
LCPP
p. 20.
Moving Picture World
8 Aug 1908
p. 108ts, 114tl.
New York Clipper
8 Aug 1908
p. 640s, 646ta.
The Daily Worker
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
A Calamitous Elopement
Release Date:
7 August 1908
Copyright Claimant:
American Mutoscope and Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
28 July 1908
Copyright Number:
H113967
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
738
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
GENRE


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

KEEP EXPLORING
Luggage, Police, Burglars, Elopement
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.