Come On, Rangers (1938)

57 mins | Western | 21 November 1938

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HISTORY

According to correspondence in the AMPAS Library file on the film, the title was changed from Texas Rangers by Republic on 15 Oct 1938. Modern sources add Bob Wilke to the ... More Less

According to correspondence in the AMPAS Library file on the film, the title was changed from Texas Rangers by Republic on 15 Oct 1938. Modern sources add Bob Wilke to the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
3 Dec 1938.
---
Film Daily
28 Nov 38
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 38
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 38
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Nov 38
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
25 Nov 38
p. 5.
Motion Picture Herald
26 Nov 38
p. 27.
Variety
4 Jan 39
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Song of the West" and "Let Me Hum a Western Song," words and music by Eddie Cherkose and Walter King
"I've Learned About Women," words and music by Johnny Marvin
"Tenting on the Old Camp Ground," words and music by Walter Kittredge.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Texas Rangers
Release Date:
21 November 1938
Production Date:
early October--20 October 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 November 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8441
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor "High Fidelity" Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
57
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
4774
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Texas Rangers Roy Rogers and his older brother Ken are disappointed when the governor disbands their group and fear that crime will increase in the territory. The governor has been advised by former Senator Harvey that the United States Cavalry can take care of law and order, but Harvey is secretly working with outlaws to increase crime so that they can sponsor a "State Patrol," financed by local citizens. After the Rangers are disbanded, Ken returns to his family and farm and Roy decides to join a Cavalry unit under Col. Forbes' command. Roy is attracted to Forbes' daughter Janice, whom he met one day when her wagon was stuck. Shortly after Roy joins the Cavalry, he is sent out on patrol with Lt. Nelson to look for a group of outlaws known as the White Horse Raiders who are terrorizing the territory. When they reach Ken's ranch, they are shocked to find that Ken and his wife have both been killed by the outlaws. Back at the post, Roy asks the colonel to be allowed to leave the army to pursue his brother's murderers, but Forbes tells him that soldiers can't come and go as they please. After an angry diatribe against the inefficiency of the army, Roy is confined to quarters. With his friend Jeff's help, Roy is soon able to escape, despite Nelson's warning that he would be considered a deserter if he left. When Roy arrives in Prairie City, he finds Harvey speaking about the State Patrol to the townspeople, but convinces them to petition the governor to to reinstate the rangers instead of paying for Harvey's patrol. ... +


Texas Rangers Roy Rogers and his older brother Ken are disappointed when the governor disbands their group and fear that crime will increase in the territory. The governor has been advised by former Senator Harvey that the United States Cavalry can take care of law and order, but Harvey is secretly working with outlaws to increase crime so that they can sponsor a "State Patrol," financed by local citizens. After the Rangers are disbanded, Ken returns to his family and farm and Roy decides to join a Cavalry unit under Col. Forbes' command. Roy is attracted to Forbes' daughter Janice, whom he met one day when her wagon was stuck. Shortly after Roy joins the Cavalry, he is sent out on patrol with Lt. Nelson to look for a group of outlaws known as the White Horse Raiders who are terrorizing the territory. When they reach Ken's ranch, they are shocked to find that Ken and his wife have both been killed by the outlaws. Back at the post, Roy asks the colonel to be allowed to leave the army to pursue his brother's murderers, but Forbes tells him that soldiers can't come and go as they please. After an angry diatribe against the inefficiency of the army, Roy is confined to quarters. With his friend Jeff's help, Roy is soon able to escape, despite Nelson's warning that he would be considered a deserter if he left. When Roy arrives in Prairie City, he finds Harvey speaking about the State Patrol to the townspeople, but convinces them to petition the governor to to reinstate the rangers instead of paying for Harvey's patrol. Later that evening, Roy sees a wanted poster and recognizes the face as that of Burke, Harvey's right-hand man, who is wanted for murder. Soon the governor responds to the citizens of Prairie City by announcing plans to visit. Hoping to keep the governor away from Roy's influence, Harvey arranges for Roy to be captured and brought to town as the leader of the White Horse gang. Meanwhile, Jeff sees Roy's horse Trigger roaming free and realizes that Roy must be in trouble, he then finds Roy and helps him to escape, then sets a smoke signal at the old Rangers' headquarters, signally the former Rangers to come to their aid. While some of the White Horse Raiders are robbing the local bank, Roy sneaks into their camp and cuts their saddle straps so that they are thrown from their horses and cannot escape before the Rangers come. When Burke escapes, he heads toward Harvey's house, followed by Roy, but Lt. Nelson and his troops arrive just in time to arrest Burke and Harvey when they try to blame each other for the crimes. Finally, at Roy's court-martial, he is found guilty of desertion, but his only sentence is to rejoin the newly reformed Texas Rangers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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