Full page view
HISTORY

The 8 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A good study, illustrating the tenacity of purpose which is such an important component of average Sicilian character. There is plenty of stiletto work, some shooting and a dogged persistence in trailing which would do credit to a Sherlock Holmes. The story is a simple one of love and jealousy, with the peculiar characteristics of the people represented carefully worked out. As one watches the pictures, noting the work of the separate actors, it seems like one of the most consistent films the Biograph Company has ever put out. Costuming and surroundings are faithfully reproduced, with details introduced which add materially to its attractiveness. It is an example of making a somewhat repulsive subject interesting, and, as such, reflects credit on the producers; but judging from the comments we have heard, the subject itself and the graphic portrayal is a bit too repellent for select audiences. In most Biograph pictures there is a good moral or an episode of real life that is made interesting and instructive, but we cannot see any reason for portraying such sentiments as are expressed ‘In Little Italy.’””
       Parts of this film were shot at the Biography studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York ... More Less

The 8 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A good study, illustrating the tenacity of purpose which is such an important component of average Sicilian character. There is plenty of stiletto work, some shooting and a dogged persistence in trailing which would do credit to a Sherlock Holmes. The story is a simple one of love and jealousy, with the peculiar characteristics of the people represented carefully worked out. As one watches the pictures, noting the work of the separate actors, it seems like one of the most consistent films the Biograph Company has ever put out. Costuming and surroundings are faithfully reproduced, with details introduced which add materially to its attractiveness. It is an example of making a somewhat repulsive subject interesting, and, as such, reflects credit on the producers; but judging from the comments we have heard, the subject itself and the graphic portrayal is a bit too repellent for select audiences. In most Biograph pictures there is a good moral or an episode of real life that is made interesting and instructive, but we cannot see any reason for portraying such sentiments as are expressed ‘In Little Italy.’””
       Parts of this film were shot at the Biography studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 153.
BPL
pp. 122-123.
EMP
p. 155.
LCMP
p. 28, column 3.
LCPP
p. 194.
Moving Picture World
25 Dec 1909
p. 927ts, 930ta, 940tl.
Moving Picture World
8 Jan 1910
p. 17r.
NYDM
25 Dec 1909
p. 16ta.
NYDM
1 Jan 1910
p. 17r.
The Daily Worker
p. 60.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 December 1909
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
29 December 1909
Copyright Number:
J136491
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
956
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Marie Cadrona, a widowed mother of two small children, is sought in marriage by Victor Ratazzi, a barber, and Tony Guilletto, a laborer. Marie rejects Tony’s suit, but hearkens to the love songs of Victor, who serenades the pretty widow accompanied by the accordion. Tony, upon learning of Victor’s acceptance, is determined to be revenged. He decides to wait, surprise him and strike him down. Several times the opportunity seems to present itself, but just as the fatal blow is about to be given someone appears on the scene to prevent it. Meanwhile, Victor is totally ignorant of the threatening danger, for Tony plays well the serpent. An Italian ball is held, and Victor escorts Marie there. Tony is present and feels now is his chance. Victor and Marie are dancing and as they pass Tony, Victor drops from a stab wound in the side, of course inflicted by Tony, who gets away unnoticed. The next morning he visits the corner saloon with an expression of satisfaction on his countenance only to learn that his deed was not fatal, and his victim is being cared for at the home of the widow. Enraged beyond measure, he makes his way to her house and tries to get into the room where Victor lies on a cot, wounded. The door being barricaded, he tries to effect an entrance through the window, but a portable cupboard placed in front prevents him, so kicking in the cellar door he climbs up a ladder to a trap in the floor; on this trap the widow places a heavy trunk and she and one of the children sit on it to increase the weight, while ... +


“Marie Cadrona, a widowed mother of two small children, is sought in marriage by Victor Ratazzi, a barber, and Tony Guilletto, a laborer. Marie rejects Tony’s suit, but hearkens to the love songs of Victor, who serenades the pretty widow accompanied by the accordion. Tony, upon learning of Victor’s acceptance, is determined to be revenged. He decides to wait, surprise him and strike him down. Several times the opportunity seems to present itself, but just as the fatal blow is about to be given someone appears on the scene to prevent it. Meanwhile, Victor is totally ignorant of the threatening danger, for Tony plays well the serpent. An Italian ball is held, and Victor escorts Marie there. Tony is present and feels now is his chance. Victor and Marie are dancing and as they pass Tony, Victor drops from a stab wound in the side, of course inflicted by Tony, who gets away unnoticed. The next morning he visits the corner saloon with an expression of satisfaction on his countenance only to learn that his deed was not fatal, and his victim is being cared for at the home of the widow. Enraged beyond measure, he makes his way to her house and tries to get into the room where Victor lies on a cot, wounded. The door being barricaded, he tries to effect an entrance through the window, but a portable cupboard placed in front prevents him, so kicking in the cellar door he climbs up a ladder to a trap in the floor; on this trap the widow places a heavy trunk and she and one of the children sit on it to increase the weight, while she dispatches the other child for the constable. Tony soon overcomes this resistance and forcing his way through the trap is just about to finish the destruction of Victor, when a well-directed shot from the constable’s gun, who has just arrived, causes the stiletto to fall from his hand. Tony is taken into custody, and Marie, unmolested, attends Victor, looking forward to the day when he will be well enough to make her his wife.”—25 Dec 1909 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.