The Dancing Girl of Butte (1910)

Drama, Romance | 6 January 1910

Full page view
HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A man of good standing, an artist on a newspaper, falls in love with a dance-hall girl. He is unaware of her occupation. When confronted with the facts of the girl’s reputation as well as occupation, he is angry and frustrated. However, the final scenes show him and the dance-hall girl pushing a baby carriage, and the inference is that it all worked out for the best. All the scenes, both interior and exterior, were photographed from a single camera position.”
       The 22 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A drama of considerable power which tells an interesting love story, though perhaps one may be permitted to say that it is not so strong as most of the Biograph productions. It tells of the love of a newspaper artist for a dancing girl, and exhibits a strongly dramatic picture when he discovers the truth regarding her occupation; but she convinces him of her purity and sincerity and they are married. Visible evidence is afforded afterward that in this instance, at least, the marriage was happy. While it is not a great film, it is well acted and the photography is clear and the situations are satisfactorily worked out. The film ends happily, which is an important point in pleasing the public.”
       Interiors were filmed at the Biograph studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City.
       An advertisement in the 8 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World billed this film as a “Romance of a Western Dance ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A man of good standing, an artist on a newspaper, falls in love with a dance-hall girl. He is unaware of her occupation. When confronted with the facts of the girl’s reputation as well as occupation, he is angry and frustrated. However, the final scenes show him and the dance-hall girl pushing a baby carriage, and the inference is that it all worked out for the best. All the scenes, both interior and exterior, were photographed from a single camera position.”
       The 22 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A drama of considerable power which tells an interesting love story, though perhaps one may be permitted to say that it is not so strong as most of the Biograph productions. It tells of the love of a newspaper artist for a dancing girl, and exhibits a strongly dramatic picture when he discovers the truth regarding her occupation; but she convinces him of her purity and sincerity and they are married. Visible evidence is afforded afterward that in this instance, at least, the marriage was happy. While it is not a great film, it is well acted and the photography is clear and the situations are satisfactorily worked out. The film ends happily, which is an important point in pleasing the public.”
       Interiors were filmed at the Biograph studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City.
       An advertisement in the 8 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World billed this film as a “Romance of a Western Dance Hall.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 157.
BPL
pp. 122-123.
EMP
p. 73.
LCMP
p. 15, column 1.
LCPP
pp. 178-179.
Moving Picture World
8 Jan 1910
p. 25ts, 26ta, 36tl.
Moving Picture World
22 Jan 1910
p. 91r.
NYDM
8 Jan 1910
p. 18ta.
The Daily Worker
p. 70.
Variety
15 Jan 1910
tr.
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 January 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
8 January 1910
Copyright Number:
J136851
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
984
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Some of the most important triumphs in the world’s history were attained through an accident, and very often the whole course of one’s future is induced by a slight mishap. Such, indeed, was the experience of the hero and heroine of this Biograph subject. Bella is a dancer in a music ball at Butte. She is pretty, light-hearted, and yet possessed of a refined nature that commands a respect not looked for in such surroundings. Strolling through the city park one morning, she steps on an uneven spot in the path and turns her ankle. Her cry of pain brings to her aid Howard Raymond, who assists her to her home. Bella’s demure manner and pretty face appeal to Howard, and he realizes it is a case of love at first sight. Bella, herself, is deeply impressed with the young man the accident has caused her to meet. However, she realizes her position and dissipates all serious thoughts on the matter. Howard, who is a newspaper artist and an enthusiast in all respects, tells his fellow artists of his love for the unknown girl. They, being used to his impetuousness, simply smile. On this occasion he is in earnest, and hastening back to the girl’s house, he surprises her in her dance hall attire. This she explains by making him believe that she is a member of a traveling dramatic company. Well, it is the old story. The accident was simply a trick of Cupid to bring two hearts together, and they are betrothed. They exchange photographs, and when he shows her picture to his friends they recognize in it the dancing girl. So they go to the girl ... +


“Some of the most important triumphs in the world’s history were attained through an accident, and very often the whole course of one’s future is induced by a slight mishap. Such, indeed, was the experience of the hero and heroine of this Biograph subject. Bella is a dancer in a music ball at Butte. She is pretty, light-hearted, and yet possessed of a refined nature that commands a respect not looked for in such surroundings. Strolling through the city park one morning, she steps on an uneven spot in the path and turns her ankle. Her cry of pain brings to her aid Howard Raymond, who assists her to her home. Bella’s demure manner and pretty face appeal to Howard, and he realizes it is a case of love at first sight. Bella, herself, is deeply impressed with the young man the accident has caused her to meet. However, she realizes her position and dissipates all serious thoughts on the matter. Howard, who is a newspaper artist and an enthusiast in all respects, tells his fellow artists of his love for the unknown girl. They, being used to his impetuousness, simply smile. On this occasion he is in earnest, and hastening back to the girl’s house, he surprises her in her dance hall attire. This she explains by making him believe that she is a member of a traveling dramatic company. Well, it is the old story. The accident was simply a trick of Cupid to bring two hearts together, and they are betrothed. They exchange photographs, and when he shows her picture to his friends they recognize in it the dancing girl. So they go to the girl and ask her to give him up. This she is loath to do, admitting that while she has danced at the hall, the work was detestable. Finding her unwilling to repulse his suit, they tell Howard of her calling, which he does not believe, and knocks one of them down for what he regards an insult. The girl, however, in honesty enters and admit the truth, taking the artist to the place where she works. What a blow to the poor fellow, and he turns from her with a crushed heart. Cut to the quick by his repulsion, she tells him that although she has been forced to earn a living in this fashion, she is through with it all, and while her soul is pure she will leave it. The sincerity of her tone softens the young man, and turning, he takes her in his arms. His friends smile derisively and leave the hall. Two years later the artist's two friends are sitting in the park, when a young couple pass pushing a perambulator containing a baby. One of them exclaims: ‘Look! Raymond and the dancing girl. Well, I'll be mowed!’”—8 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.