Director:

Ashley Miller

Production Company:

Edison Mfg. Co.
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HISTORY

The 7 May 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A good story by Richard Harding Davis, one of lively incident, but requiring too many subtitles to tell it. An office boy loses his job in a newspaper organization and recovers it by shadowing a suspected criminal who has lost one finger. We are not let into the secret of why the four-fingered gentleman was suspected of the crime, nor why this one in particular was suspected—there might be others similarly deformed—but those are mere details. The boy steals a cab in order to get the news to his office, and for this meritorious action he is given another chance. Probably many will remember with what delight they read this story by Richard Harding Davis when it first appeared, and probably if the truth were known, a good many who enjoyed it then have returned to it again and again since. It had that unexplainable quality which made it popular as soon as issued, and it has remained so ever since. In this Edison film the narrative is closely followed, and the picturesque portions are sufficiently emphasized to make them appear even more real than it does under the magic of Mr. Davis’ pen. It is a story that lends itself acceptably to motion picture production, allowing opportunity for picturesque presentation. The work has been well done, and the film should prove as popular as the story has been. Further, it will stimulate interest in a type of story which should be even more popular than it ever has been before, a type which, like the film which reproduces this one, has elements of attractiveness beyond ... More Less

The 7 May 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A good story by Richard Harding Davis, one of lively incident, but requiring too many subtitles to tell it. An office boy loses his job in a newspaper organization and recovers it by shadowing a suspected criminal who has lost one finger. We are not let into the secret of why the four-fingered gentleman was suspected of the crime, nor why this one in particular was suspected—there might be others similarly deformed—but those are mere details. The boy steals a cab in order to get the news to his office, and for this meritorious action he is given another chance. Probably many will remember with what delight they read this story by Richard Harding Davis when it first appeared, and probably if the truth were known, a good many who enjoyed it then have returned to it again and again since. It had that unexplainable quality which made it popular as soon as issued, and it has remained so ever since. In this Edison film the narrative is closely followed, and the picturesque portions are sufficiently emphasized to make them appear even more real than it does under the magic of Mr. Davis’ pen. It is a story that lends itself acceptably to motion picture production, allowing opportunity for picturesque presentation. The work has been well done, and the film should prove as popular as the story has been. Further, it will stimulate interest in a type of story which should be even more popular than it ever has been before, a type which, like the film which reproduces this one, has elements of attractiveness beyond the ordinary.”
       Edison and Conquest Pictures remade Gallegher in 1917 as a short film directed by Ben Turbett and starring Andy Clark.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
LCMP
p. 22, column 2.
Moving Picture News
16 Apr 1910
p. 15tl.
Moving Picture World
2 Apr 1910
p. 524ada.
Moving Picture World
16 Apr 1910
p. 588ada, 611ts, 618tl.
Moving Picture World
23 Apr 1910
p. 653ta.
Moving Picture World
30 Apr 1910
p. 703tl.
Moving Picture World
7 May 1910
p. 736tr.
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
Story and scr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book Gallegher and Other Stories by Richard Harding Davis (New York, 1891).
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 April 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Edison Mfg. Co.
Copyright Date:
26 April 1910
Copyright Number:
J141051-J141055
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
985
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“The first scenes show how the story begins with the murder and robbery of an old millionaire and the escape of his secretary. The detective who is put on the case comes into the newspaper office to see his reporter friend and there Gallegher hears of the case, when he becomes possessed of the wild desire, which probably fills every boy’s heart, of playing detective. He is so enthralled with the profession and the personality of the sleuth that in spite of all remonstrances from his employer, the editor, he follows the man when he leaves the office. The next scenes show Gallegher watching the passers-by on the street corner and in the railway station, searching vainly for a man who looks like the photograph of the much sought secretary, who has only three fingers on his right hand. The boy’s vigilance is unexpectedly rewarded when he finds that the criminal has purchased a ticket for a small suburban station near which, as the initiated know, a prize fight is to take place that night. The criminal has disguised himself by removing his beard and moustache, but unfortunately for him this makes him look all the more like his youthful picture in the detective’s possession. Gallegher, not knowing that his absence from the office resulted in his discharge, seeks his friend, the reporter, and taking the detective with him they go to the prize fight. The fistic encounter takes place in an old barn and they are easily able to locate the criminal, but just as the fight is in full progress, the detective about to arrest his man and the newspaper reporter and Gallegher to get their great ... +


“The first scenes show how the story begins with the murder and robbery of an old millionaire and the escape of his secretary. The detective who is put on the case comes into the newspaper office to see his reporter friend and there Gallegher hears of the case, when he becomes possessed of the wild desire, which probably fills every boy’s heart, of playing detective. He is so enthralled with the profession and the personality of the sleuth that in spite of all remonstrances from his employer, the editor, he follows the man when he leaves the office. The next scenes show Gallegher watching the passers-by on the street corner and in the railway station, searching vainly for a man who looks like the photograph of the much sought secretary, who has only three fingers on his right hand. The boy’s vigilance is unexpectedly rewarded when he finds that the criminal has purchased a ticket for a small suburban station near which, as the initiated know, a prize fight is to take place that night. The criminal has disguised himself by removing his beard and moustache, but unfortunately for him this makes him look all the more like his youthful picture in the detective’s possession. Gallegher, not knowing that his absence from the office resulted in his discharge, seeks his friend, the reporter, and taking the detective with him they go to the prize fight. The fistic encounter takes place in an old barn and they are easily able to locate the criminal, but just as the fight is in full progress, the detective about to arrest his man and the newspaper reporter and Gallegher to get their great ‘scoop,’ the police appear and everybody is under arrest. The reporter’s plea to be allowed to send his story to the paper is unavailing. The sergeant is inflexible, but Gallegher, slipping his hand into the reporter’s pocket, takes the notebook and, crying pitifully, succeeds by his very size and youth in getting by the sergeant and away. He borrows a cab and, though fired after by the other officers, lashes the horse into a run, and the next scenes show him speeding away toward the newspaper office where compositors and pressmen are holding the morning edition for the promised story. The boy’s wild ride is stopped twice by officers whom his street gamin shrewdness succeeds in throwing off the track, and just when all hope has been abandoned and the paper is going to press without it, he rushes in with the story and falls in a little heap on the floor. Needless to say that after this he does not lose his job.”—16 Apr 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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