The Golden Supper (1910)

Melodrama | 12 December 1910

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HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “The film, based on Tennyson’s poem ‘Lover’s Tale,’ shows a young man as he makes a farewell visit to the tomb of his unrequited love. However, he finds her alive, and courageously sets out to find her husband for her, since after the death of his beloved wife, the grief-stricken husband had abandoned civilization. The film ends as husband and wife are reunited by her admirer’s unselfish act. All of the actors wear fifteenth century Italian costumes. The film was photographed on a Greenwich, Connecticut, estate. The title is followed by a line reading ‘Adaptation from Alfred Lord Tennysen’s poem.'”
       The 24 Dec 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “The theme of this story is well known to all readers as it is told by Bocaccio and as it appears in the sequel to Tennyson’s ‘The Lovers’ Tale.’ It is a love story, made remarkable by the fact that the woman’s former lover restores her to consciousness and returns her to her husband. While all this may be understood by the person who has read Bocaccio, it is quite probable that a good many in every audience will not know what it means. The sub-titles help, but it must be admitted that unless one is familiar with the origin of the story it is more or less obscure. A golden supper may be quite the proper place in dreamland to return what one most desires, but in motion picture land it requires something more than the scenes and the sub-titles to make it intelligible.”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “The film, based on Tennyson’s poem ‘Lover’s Tale,’ shows a young man as he makes a farewell visit to the tomb of his unrequited love. However, he finds her alive, and courageously sets out to find her husband for her, since after the death of his beloved wife, the grief-stricken husband had abandoned civilization. The film ends as husband and wife are reunited by her admirer’s unselfish act. All of the actors wear fifteenth century Italian costumes. The film was photographed on a Greenwich, Connecticut, estate. The title is followed by a line reading ‘Adaptation from Alfred Lord Tennysen’s poem.'”
       The 24 Dec 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “The theme of this story is well known to all readers as it is told by Bocaccio and as it appears in the sequel to Tennyson’s ‘The Lovers’ Tale.’ It is a love story, made remarkable by the fact that the woman’s former lover restores her to consciousness and returns her to her husband. While all this may be understood by the person who has read Bocaccio, it is quite probable that a good many in every audience will not know what it means. The sub-titles help, but it must be admitted that unless one is familiar with the origin of the story it is more or less obscure. A golden supper may be quite the proper place in dreamland to return what one most desires, but in motion picture land it requires something more than the scenes and the sub-titles to make it intelligible.”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City.
       An advertisement in the 17 Dec 1910 Moving Picture World made clear that The Golden Supper was an “Adaptation from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s Poem.” However, the earlier source was Giovanni Boccaccio's Fourth Novel of the Tenth Day in his fourteenth-century Decameron.
       Biograph reissued this film on 27 Mar 1916. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 255.
BPL
pp. 132-133.
EMP
p. 122.
Film Index
17 Dec 1910
p. 22.
LCMP
p. 23, column 3.
LCPP
p. 189.
Moving Picture News
17 Dec 1910
p. 19tl.
Moving Picture World
17 Dec 1910
p. 1426ts, 1429tl.
Moving Picture World
24 Dec 1910
p. 1478tr.
NFAC3
p. 172.
The Daily Worker
p. 99.
Treasures from the Film Archives
p. 267.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the poem "A Lover's Tale" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1833).
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 December 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
15 December 1910
Copyright Number:
J148744
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
998
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Julian loves his cousin and foster sister Camilla, who is wooed and won by Lionel, his friend and rival. He is a witness to their marriage and after the ceremony he departs heartbroken to his own house. Utopian was the existence of Lionel and Camilla, until some time later Camilla is seized with a serious illness, and Lionel’s grief knew no bounds when he heard ‘That low knell tolling his lady dead.’ ‘She had lain three days without a pulse, all that look’d on her had pronounced her dead. So they bore her—for in Julian’s land they never nail a dumb head up in elm—bore her free-faced to the free airs of heaven, and laid her in the vault of her own kin.’ Julian learns of the death of Camilla, and hastens to the house, arriving in time to see the funeral cortège moving slowly towards the sepulcher. Following in its wake he exclaims, ‘Now, now, will I go down into the grave; I will be all alone with all I love.’ So after the train had departed from the vault, Julian enters ‘and at the far end of the vault he saw Camilla with the moonlight on her face: All the rest of her drowned in the gloom and horror of the vault.’ Bending over, he kisses her hand, and ‘tis then he finds her supposed death is but as sleep, for she revives from out the trance. ‘He raised her softly, and wrapping her all over with the cloak he wore, bore her through the solitary land back to the mother’s house where she was born.’ Conquering his desire, he goes to bring back Lionel, her husband. ... +


“Julian loves his cousin and foster sister Camilla, who is wooed and won by Lionel, his friend and rival. He is a witness to their marriage and after the ceremony he departs heartbroken to his own house. Utopian was the existence of Lionel and Camilla, until some time later Camilla is seized with a serious illness, and Lionel’s grief knew no bounds when he heard ‘That low knell tolling his lady dead.’ ‘She had lain three days without a pulse, all that look’d on her had pronounced her dead. So they bore her—for in Julian’s land they never nail a dumb head up in elm—bore her free-faced to the free airs of heaven, and laid her in the vault of her own kin.’ Julian learns of the death of Camilla, and hastens to the house, arriving in time to see the funeral cortège moving slowly towards the sepulcher. Following in its wake he exclaims, ‘Now, now, will I go down into the grave; I will be all alone with all I love.’ So after the train had departed from the vault, Julian enters ‘and at the far end of the vault he saw Camilla with the moonlight on her face: All the rest of her drowned in the gloom and horror of the vault.’ Bending over, he kisses her hand, and ‘tis then he finds her supposed death is but as sleep, for she revives from out the trance. ‘He raised her softly, and wrapping her all over with the cloak he wore, bore her through the solitary land back to the mother’s house where she was born.’ Conquering his desire, he goes to bring back Lionel, her husband. Meanwhile Lionel, grief-stricken, determines to become a recluse, going to the deserted cliffs overlooking the sea, where he secures from an old mendicant his thatched hut. After a search, Lionel is located through the meeting of the old man and the searching party. He refuses to go back as he is yet ignorant of Camilla’s resuscitation, and so is taken by force. To effect a meeting of Lionel and Camilla without a shock, Julian arranges the Golden Supper, a custom in the East when a man bestowed upon his honored guest his most valued treasure, and acting upon Camilla’s injunction, ‘You have given me life and love again, and none but you yourself shall tell him of it, and you shall give me back when he returns.’ Julian presents Camilla to Lionel during this supper. Lionel at first cannot realize the truth; he seems to be dreaming, but positive material manifestations awaken him to the reality. Julian’s duty performed, he leaves forever.”—17 Dec 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.