Full page view
HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “The closeness of a Quaker family is disrupted when the girl falls in love with a wealthy young man, the victim of an automobile accident, who is brought into her home to recuperate. Her father, very upset because the young man is a concert singer, disowns his daughter and sends her from her home. After she has begun her new life as a young married socialite, ill fortune forces her parents to become inmates of the local poor farm. The daughter learns of their plight, and she and her husband hurry to alleviate it. The father, still obdurate, refuses to talk to her. In the last scenes, the young woman plays her father’s favorite hymn on the organ, and the old man leaves his floor scrubbing to embrace her. The film ends with the little family once more reconciled.”
       The 20 Aug 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “An exhibition of the results of pride which will, perhaps, arouse memories of more or less strength in the minds of a large number of people. A stubborn father, through unreasoning pride, brings much sorrow and many a heartache to his family. When he and his devoted wife are finally driven from their home to the poorhouse he becomes an object of contempt, a common ending of the proud. Then the disowned daughter comes to their rescue and succeeds in subduing her father's pride and thereby re-unites the family. The story is suggestive and causes those who see the film to apply the rule to their own experience, or, perhaps, the experience of someone they have known. ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “The closeness of a Quaker family is disrupted when the girl falls in love with a wealthy young man, the victim of an automobile accident, who is brought into her home to recuperate. Her father, very upset because the young man is a concert singer, disowns his daughter and sends her from her home. After she has begun her new life as a young married socialite, ill fortune forces her parents to become inmates of the local poor farm. The daughter learns of their plight, and she and her husband hurry to alleviate it. The father, still obdurate, refuses to talk to her. In the last scenes, the young woman plays her father’s favorite hymn on the organ, and the old man leaves his floor scrubbing to embrace her. The film ends with the little family once more reconciled.”
       The 20 Aug 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “An exhibition of the results of pride which will, perhaps, arouse memories of more or less strength in the minds of a large number of people. A stubborn father, through unreasoning pride, brings much sorrow and many a heartache to his family. When he and his devoted wife are finally driven from their home to the poorhouse he becomes an object of contempt, a common ending of the proud. Then the disowned daughter comes to their rescue and succeeds in subduing her father's pride and thereby re-unites the family. The story is suggestive and causes those who see the film to apply the rule to their own experience, or, perhaps, the experience of someone they have known. Dramatically, the picture is worked out with attention to details, and, photographically, it is up to the Biograph standard.”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 218.
BPL
pp. 128-129.
EMP
pp. 134-135.
LCMP
p. 25, column 2.
LCPP
p. 190.
Moving Picture News
6 Aug 1910
p. 15tl.
Moving Picture World
6 Aug 1910
p. 309ts, 310tl, 314tl.
Moving Picture World
20 Aug 1910
p. 406tr.
Nickelodeon
1 Aug 1910
p. 76.
The Daily Worker
pp. 86-87.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 August 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
6 August 1910
Copyright Number:
J144012
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
996
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Of all human actions, pride seldom obtains its end; for, aiming at honor and reputation, it reaps contempt and derision. It was the sin that overthrew the angels. It proceeds from the want of sense or the want of thought. The old father in this Biograph story was possessed of such unreasonable pride as to cause much misery and heartache. We cannot consistently call it pride, but rather, narrow prejudice. Mr. and Mrs. Southcomb dearly loved their only daughter Ann, but, being Quakers, had set ideas. Ann was a pretty girl of twenty, bright, vivacious and romantic, and loved her parents devotedly, but she chafed under what she deemed almost parental despotism. They decried any ebullition her youth might induce, and frowned into silence her joyous ringing laughter. This condition told on her and she longed for life’s radiant sunshine, love. It comes at last. Allen Edwards, a concert singer, while driving his auto in the neighborhood of the old Quaker’s farm, meets with a serious accident, and is carried to the Southcomb homestead. He is in such a condition that he cannot be removed to his home for some time, and hence is cared for by the Southcomb family, although the old man openly expresses his aversion for the young man on account of the profession. An attachment springs up between Ann and Allen which ripens into sincere love. The old man is beside himself with rage when they broach the subject of marriage. But Ann is decided and the old man, though he loves his daughter, haughtily drives her from the house, for when pride begins love ceases. He stubbornly refuses to have anything further to do ... +


“Of all human actions, pride seldom obtains its end; for, aiming at honor and reputation, it reaps contempt and derision. It was the sin that overthrew the angels. It proceeds from the want of sense or the want of thought. The old father in this Biograph story was possessed of such unreasonable pride as to cause much misery and heartache. We cannot consistently call it pride, but rather, narrow prejudice. Mr. and Mrs. Southcomb dearly loved their only daughter Ann, but, being Quakers, had set ideas. Ann was a pretty girl of twenty, bright, vivacious and romantic, and loved her parents devotedly, but she chafed under what she deemed almost parental despotism. They decried any ebullition her youth might induce, and frowned into silence her joyous ringing laughter. This condition told on her and she longed for life’s radiant sunshine, love. It comes at last. Allen Edwards, a concert singer, while driving his auto in the neighborhood of the old Quaker’s farm, meets with a serious accident, and is carried to the Southcomb homestead. He is in such a condition that he cannot be removed to his home for some time, and hence is cared for by the Southcomb family, although the old man openly expresses his aversion for the young man on account of the profession. An attachment springs up between Ann and Allen which ripens into sincere love. The old man is beside himself with rage when they broach the subject of marriage. But Ann is decided and the old man, though he loves his daughter, haughtily drives her from the house, for when pride begins love ceases. He stubbornly refuses to have anything further to do with her. He becomes so bitter that he erases her name from the family Bible. To him she is as dead. Many a heartache does the young wife suffer, though Allen has tried time and time again to effect a reconciliation, until one day they receive word that the old Southcomb farm had been seized for debt and the couple were forced to go to the poorhouse. What a shock this is to the young couple! It is the old story of pride defeating its own end by bringing the man who seeks esteem into contempt. The young people make their way to the poorhouse, where the old father is seen scrubbing floors, while the mother bends over a washtub. They are brought to the office to interview their disowned daughter, but the old man is still adamant, and while the mother is inclined to accept Ann’s protection the father stubbornly refuses, going back with hauteur to his scrub pail. Ann now realizes that something more than bare persuasion must be resorted to, and as she views through the half open door her parents’ sad plight, an idea strikes her. Seating herself at the organ, she plays and sings her father’s favorite hymn. The sound of the music halts the old man in his work, and he crawls sobbing to the door to hear the better. Ann continues to play and sing until at last he staggers up to be folded in her arms. He now realizes how unreasonable he has been, not only to her, but to her mother and himself.”—6 Aug 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.