Full page view
HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A printer with anarchistic tendencies becomes rude and outright violent when his wealthy employer invites his dinner guests to inspect his publishing plant. The printer is discharged and decides upon revenge. Armed with a pistol, he goes to his employer’s house. Here he finds his boss with his small daughter, a permanent cripple. Touched by the child’s plight and her courage, he finds himself unable to take the revenge he had planned. His employer realizes that his ex-employee has undergone a change of attitude, and rehires him. The film was made on four sets: the wealthy man’s house, the print shop, the laborer’s apartment, and the exterior of the rich man’s house.”
       The 15 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A helpful picture. Not alone is it good dramatically, but it teaches the dissatisfied that wealth does not bring all that may be wanted. Often the dissatisfied working man has what the man of wealth would give all he has to possess. The difficulty is to make the dissatisfied iconoclast understand this. If the poor man could be made to understand the griefs and heartaches and sorrows which often surround the wealthy the way this man found it, anarchism and the worst forms of socialism would cease. A picture which does so much to clear up a misunderstanding has a reason for existence far beyond the mere matter of amusement. The man entered the house to murder. He left it with a chastened spirit and a clearer comprehension of the heartaches that trouble the rich. And he went back to his home and his ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A printer with anarchistic tendencies becomes rude and outright violent when his wealthy employer invites his dinner guests to inspect his publishing plant. The printer is discharged and decides upon revenge. Armed with a pistol, he goes to his employer’s house. Here he finds his boss with his small daughter, a permanent cripple. Touched by the child’s plight and her courage, he finds himself unable to take the revenge he had planned. His employer realizes that his ex-employee has undergone a change of attitude, and rehires him. The film was made on four sets: the wealthy man’s house, the print shop, the laborer’s apartment, and the exterior of the rich man’s house.”
       The 15 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A helpful picture. Not alone is it good dramatically, but it teaches the dissatisfied that wealth does not bring all that may be wanted. Often the dissatisfied working man has what the man of wealth would give all he has to possess. The difficulty is to make the dissatisfied iconoclast understand this. If the poor man could be made to understand the griefs and heartaches and sorrows which often surround the wealthy the way this man found it, anarchism and the worst forms of socialism would cease. A picture which does so much to clear up a misunderstanding has a reason for existence far beyond the mere matter of amusement. The man entered the house to murder. He left it with a chastened spirit and a clearer comprehension of the heartaches that trouble the rich. And he went back to his home and his work, convinced that his lot was not bad and that he might make it better if he would. It is a sermon in ethics and it deserves wide circulation so its teaching may reach to the confines of the country. ”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 235.
BPL
pp. 130-131.
EMP
p. 154.
LCMP
p. 28, column 2.
LCPP
p. 193.
Moving Picture News
8 Oct 1910
p. 11tr.
Moving Picture World
8 Oct 1910
p. 820ts, 828tl.
Moving Picture World
15 Oct 1910
p. 876tr.
Nickelodeon
1 Oct 1910
p. 205.
The Daily Worker
p. 92.
Variety
8 Oct 1910
tr.
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 October 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
5 October 1910
Copyright Number:
J146130
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
992
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Iconoclasm, the attacking of cherished beliefs and theories, has ever been the incitement of discontent, but the iconoclast of to-day may be better termed the socialist. Discontent is rather induced by selfishness, and selfishness is the seed of irrational socialism, nurtured mainly by laziness, and very often, drink. The principal character of this Biograph story is a lazy, drink-sotted printer. He must be urged by his poor suffering wife to leave his cups to go to work. As usual he arrives at the office late, and an argument between him and the foreman ensues, just as the proprietor of the establishment enters, escorting a party of his friends to show them about and introduce them to the mysteries of his printing plant. The sight of these people dressed in sables and silk is extremely odious to this disgruntled workman, and when the proprietor shows a spirit of cordiality, he, galled by the inequality of their stations, repels it, and with a show of anarchism attempts to strike his employer. For this he is discharged, but his wife begs him, for the sake of their children, to try to get his position back, which he endeavors to do, but in vain. By this time he is ripe for anything, and drink-mad, sets about to take a fool’s method of leveling ranks, that is, armed with a pistol he makes his way to his former employer’s home to wreak revenge. We anticipate the printer’s visit to the publisher’s home, by showing the publisher in the depths of despair over the intelligence that his little child, despite the endeavors of surgical experts, is an incurable cripple. This is the scene that greets ... +


“Iconoclasm, the attacking of cherished beliefs and theories, has ever been the incitement of discontent, but the iconoclast of to-day may be better termed the socialist. Discontent is rather induced by selfishness, and selfishness is the seed of irrational socialism, nurtured mainly by laziness, and very often, drink. The principal character of this Biograph story is a lazy, drink-sotted printer. He must be urged by his poor suffering wife to leave his cups to go to work. As usual he arrives at the office late, and an argument between him and the foreman ensues, just as the proprietor of the establishment enters, escorting a party of his friends to show them about and introduce them to the mysteries of his printing plant. The sight of these people dressed in sables and silk is extremely odious to this disgruntled workman, and when the proprietor shows a spirit of cordiality, he, galled by the inequality of their stations, repels it, and with a show of anarchism attempts to strike his employer. For this he is discharged, but his wife begs him, for the sake of their children, to try to get his position back, which he endeavors to do, but in vain. By this time he is ripe for anything, and drink-mad, sets about to take a fool’s method of leveling ranks, that is, armed with a pistol he makes his way to his former employer’s home to wreak revenge. We anticipate the printer’s visit to the publisher’s home, by showing the publisher in the depths of despair over the intelligence that his little child, despite the endeavors of surgical experts, is an incurable cripple. This is the scene that greets the printer at his surreptitious entrance. He finds there are things that wealth cannot buy—health and strength. He steals through the portieres with pistol in hand, intending to satisfy his covetous grudge with the death of this heart-crushed father, who sits weeping for his poor child’s misfortune. The little one realizes her father’s despair and so tries to cheer him, showing how nicely she can walk with the aid of the leg supports. This fortitude of the child makes a stronger appeal than moral suasion, and he turns from his purpose. The publisher, however, sees him and recognizes him as his former employee, and reasoning that now is the turning point in the man’s nature, detains him to persuade him to mend. The child’s mediation causes him to view the world from a different angle. Things could be better with him if he wanted them so, hence his employer gives him another chance by reinstating him in his former position at his printing office.”—8 Oct 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.