The Newlyweds (1910)

Comedy | 3 March 1910

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HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A title indicates that a married couple are getting a divorce. The husband is then sworn into a bachelor’s club that prohibits marriage. On his way home, he bumps into a little girl carrying a package of rice and some spills over him. The next scene shows the divorced man on a train where he is seated next to a lovely young woman who had discouraged several other passengers from sitting beside her. One of the passengers notices the rice on the man, assumes they are newlyweds, and this starts a series of events, which ends when the two people who were brought together on the train agree to marry one another.”
       The 5 Mar 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “Here is one of those funny pictures which are based upon the perversity of fate and the propensity of human nature to do unintended things. To bring a man-hater and a woman-hater together and set Cupid to work in devious and wholly unexpected ways, is worthy the genius of the highest type. In this instance it has been admirably done; and when the friends of the couple begin sending congratulations and presents they seek the wisest way out of the difficulty and determine to let it go at that. The fun lies chiefly in the absurdity of the situations and the fidelity with which they are worked out. The incidental features, like the Anti-Marriage Club, add to the whimsical character of the picture and increase its picturesque and dramatic qualities. It is altogether an unusually pleasing picture.”
       An article in the 29 Jan 1910 ...

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The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A title indicates that a married couple are getting a divorce. The husband is then sworn into a bachelor’s club that prohibits marriage. On his way home, he bumps into a little girl carrying a package of rice and some spills over him. The next scene shows the divorced man on a train where he is seated next to a lovely young woman who had discouraged several other passengers from sitting beside her. One of the passengers notices the rice on the man, assumes they are newlyweds, and this starts a series of events, which ends when the two people who were brought together on the train agree to marry one another.”
       The 5 Mar 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “Here is one of those funny pictures which are based upon the perversity of fate and the propensity of human nature to do unintended things. To bring a man-hater and a woman-hater together and set Cupid to work in devious and wholly unexpected ways, is worthy the genius of the highest type. In this instance it has been admirably done; and when the friends of the couple begin sending congratulations and presents they seek the wisest way out of the difficulty and determine to let it go at that. The fun lies chiefly in the absurdity of the situations and the fidelity with which they are worked out. The incidental features, like the Anti-Marriage Club, add to the whimsical character of the picture and increase its picturesque and dramatic qualities. It is altogether an unusually pleasing picture.”
       An article in the 29 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World, titled “Biograph Company Migrates to the Land of Sunshine and Flowers,” noted that the Biograph Company, with Lawrence Griffith (one of D. W. Griffith’s pseudonyms) as director-in-chief, had arrived in Los Angeles, CA, on 19 Jan 1910, joining two other migrating film operations, the Selig Company and the New York Motion Picture Company (Bison).
       An advertisement in the 5 Mar 1910 Moving Picture World billed this film as “A Comedy of Errors Corrected by Cupid.”
       Moving Picture News and Moving Picture World cite the release date as 2 Mar 1910.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 173
BPL
pp. 124-125
EMP
p. 222
LCMP
p. 41, column 2
LCPP
p. 71
Moving Picture News
5 Mar 1910
p. 15tl
Moving Picture World
29 Jan 1910
p. 120
Moving Picture World
5 Mar 1910
p. 347tl, 348ta, 349ts, 356tl
Moving Picture World
12 Mar 1910
p. 384tr
The Daily Worker
p. 74
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Newly Weds
Release Date:
3 March 1910
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Biograph Co.
7 March 1910
J138954
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
981
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

“Two of the most delectable toys of Cupid are the womanhater and the manhater, and the anti-matrimonial clubs are to him roaring farces. He may play with you as a fisherman plays with a trout, but you are hooked eventually. Dick Harcourt was betrothed to little Alice Vance, and it looked as if the villagers would soon hear the tintinnabulation of wedding bells reverberating through the flower-clothed vales of Southern California. The world is bright for Dick, the flowers take on a brighter hue, the birds sing sweeter and mental sunshine possesses him, when suddenly he is seized with an ominous convulsion. He asks himself, ‘Can this be indigestion?’ No. Little does he know that it is a premonition of a prank of Cupid, for down the lane we see approaching Alice. To our question, ‘Alice, where art thou going, pretty maid?’ ‘To give Dick the mit, sir,’ she said. This she does, hurling poor Dick from the seventh heaven of delight into the depth of despair by giving back the engagement ring. In the glorious country of oranges he has picked a lemon. At that moment he becomes a womanhater, and in resentment joins the anti-marriage club. Meanwhile a similar tragedy is enacted at the home of Dora Dean, who is cruelly jilted by her sweetheart, Harry. Here, of course, we have the manhater. They are unknown to each other and by strange coincidence determine upon a little trip to induce forgetfulness. This has not the desired effect, and a homecoming is resolved upon. Aha! Cupid is still busy—that’s the trouble, and by fortuity the bruised-hearted couple board the same train. Dora, with her extreme loathing for men, ...

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“Two of the most delectable toys of Cupid are the womanhater and the manhater, and the anti-matrimonial clubs are to him roaring farces. He may play with you as a fisherman plays with a trout, but you are hooked eventually. Dick Harcourt was betrothed to little Alice Vance, and it looked as if the villagers would soon hear the tintinnabulation of wedding bells reverberating through the flower-clothed vales of Southern California. The world is bright for Dick, the flowers take on a brighter hue, the birds sing sweeter and mental sunshine possesses him, when suddenly he is seized with an ominous convulsion. He asks himself, ‘Can this be indigestion?’ No. Little does he know that it is a premonition of a prank of Cupid, for down the lane we see approaching Alice. To our question, ‘Alice, where art thou going, pretty maid?’ ‘To give Dick the mit, sir,’ she said. This she does, hurling poor Dick from the seventh heaven of delight into the depth of despair by giving back the engagement ring. In the glorious country of oranges he has picked a lemon. At that moment he becomes a womanhater, and in resentment joins the anti-marriage club. Meanwhile a similar tragedy is enacted at the home of Dora Dean, who is cruelly jilted by her sweetheart, Harry. Here, of course, we have the manhater. They are unknown to each other and by strange coincidence determine upon a little trip to induce forgetfulness. This has not the desired effect, and a homecoming is resolved upon. Aha! Cupid is still busy—that’s the trouble, and by fortuity the bruised-hearted couple board the same train. Dora, with her extreme loathing for men, refuses to share a seat with anyone. Dick is seen absentmindedly sauntering to the station and runs against a child laden with grocery parcels, spilling a bag of rice over the sidewalk. The child in anger throws a handful of the rice at Dick, grains of which repose on his hatbrim and shoulders. After paying the damages, he continues on to the railroad station, entering the coach wherein is seated disgruntled Dora. Hers is the only seat with but one occupant and although she has refused to share it with others, a handsome fellow like Dick has some weight. Another laugh for Cupid. Shortly after the train stops one of the passengers discovers the grains of rice on Dick’s hatbrim: A bride and groom—well! Congratulations are in order. Denials useless. On the train there happens to be a member of the anti-marriage club, who telegraphs ahead the news that Dick is a traitor, requesting the club members to be at the station to give him a reception. Oh, such a reception. Headed by a rube band, the members carry signs reading, ‘Another Good Man Gone Wrong,’ ‘Marriage is a Good Thing, Nit!’ etc. A carriage, to which is hitched a razor-back mule, is waiting. Into the carriage is forced Dora, and on the rail-back of the mule is placed Dick. Through the town they parade towards Dora’s home. Two things may be imagined—the consternation of the Dean family on the arrival of this bizarre caravan; also poor Dick’s condition after his ride on this animated fence rail. This, however, is not the worst of it, for when Dick calls to apologize for the scene in which he was an unwilling actor he finds that a wealth of wedding presents have been received by the groomless bride. He is blamed for it all and her intention is to throw them out, but Dick impresses her that such a course would be shameful—Cupid still busy. Well, the presents are not disturbed nor are the address cards reading, ‘To Mr. and Mrs. Richard Harcourt’ changed. Cupid lands a knockout."—5 Mar 1910 Moving Picture World

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.