Bonnie Scotland (1935)

80 or 82 mins | Comedy | 23 August 1935

Director:

James W. Horne

Cinematographers:

Art Lloyd, Walter Lundin

Editor:

Bert Jordan

Production Companies:

Hal Roach Studios, Inc., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Kilts , Laurel and Hardy of India and McLaurel and McHardy , and it was re-issued as Heroes of the Regiment . Production on the picture was originally scheduled to begin in late Feb or early Mar, but was pre-empted by a contract dispute between Stan Laurel and Hal Roach. A 16 Mar 1935 HR news item announced that Laurel had left the Roach Studios, and a 23 Mar 1935 HR news item noted that Roach claimed Laurel had left of his own accord due to "story objections" concerning McLaurel and McHardy (as it was called at the time). The news item also reported that Laurel maintained that he "was fired without his contractual sixty days notice, on pretext of insubordination, but that the real difficulty was his failure to agree with the studio on terms of renewing his contract." Contemporary sources noted that Roach intended to star Oliver Hardy with Patsy Kelly and Spanky McFarland in a series of shorts called "The Hardy Family." The first of the series, Their Night Out , was to be directed by James Horne. On 5 Apr 1935, HR announced that Roach and Laurel had signed a new contract, which resulted in the abandonment of "The Hardy Family" shorts. Pre-production planning on McLaurel and McHardy resumed, and a HR news item noted that Horne and Laurel were working with Charles Rogers and Albert Austin on the script. Although many modern sources credit Laurel with working on the comedy team's screenplays, the contribution ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Kilts , Laurel and Hardy of India and McLaurel and McHardy , and it was re-issued as Heroes of the Regiment . Production on the picture was originally scheduled to begin in late Feb or early Mar, but was pre-empted by a contract dispute between Stan Laurel and Hal Roach. A 16 Mar 1935 HR news item announced that Laurel had left the Roach Studios, and a 23 Mar 1935 HR news item noted that Roach claimed Laurel had left of his own accord due to "story objections" concerning McLaurel and McHardy (as it was called at the time). The news item also reported that Laurel maintained that he "was fired without his contractual sixty days notice, on pretext of insubordination, but that the real difficulty was his failure to agree with the studio on terms of renewing his contract." Contemporary sources noted that Roach intended to star Oliver Hardy with Patsy Kelly and Spanky McFarland in a series of shorts called "The Hardy Family." The first of the series, Their Night Out , was to be directed by James Horne. On 5 Apr 1935, HR announced that Roach and Laurel had signed a new contract, which resulted in the abandonment of "The Hardy Family" shorts. Pre-production planning on McLaurel and McHardy resumed, and a HR news item noted that Horne and Laurel were working with Charles Rogers and Albert Austin on the script. Although many modern sources credit Laurel with working on the comedy team's screenplays, the contribution of Rogers and Austin to the completed film has not been confirmed. HR news items reported that William Janney replaced Barry Norton in the role of Alan Douglas, and that the Scottish scenes were filmed on the set built in Laurel Canyon, CA by RKO for their 1934 film The Little Minister . HR production charts include Gilbert Emery and Monte Blue in the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. According to the Call Bureau Cast Service, the Scottish soldiers were played by members of the American Legion, and the Scottish pipers were under the care of John Sutherland. According to a 23 Jul 1935 HR news item, after the film had its preview, the studio decided to "re-shoot about 1,000 feet of the picture, in an effort to eliminate some of the plot, which interfered with the Laurel and Hardy comedy."
       Although other contemporary sources list the picture's running time as 80 or 82 min., the Var review commented: "Preview was 90 minutes on the Coast, and by best eastern daylight saving time, at theater caught, it clocks 70." A number of the reviews noted that Bonnie Scotland was a spoof of Paramount's 1935 picture The Lives of a Bengal Lancer , which also employed Col. W. E. Wynn as a technical advisor. Modern sources state that Wilson Collison contributed to the script and that Roy Seawright drew the cartoon bees in the ending sequence. Modern sources complete the character identifications for Claude King ( General Fletcher ), Carlos J. de Valdez ( Hindu ) and Clive Morgan ( English officer ), and include the following actors in the cast: Jack Hill ( Hotel lobby extra/Newly drafted soldier/Native henchman ); Sam Lufkin, Leo Willis Charlie Hall and Bob O'Conor ( Native henchmen ); Bobby Dunn ( Native henchman/Man handing out flyers for the Twiddle Tweed Co. ); Marvin Hatley ( Soldier with accordian ); Anthony Francis, Raizada Devinder and Nath Bali ( Hindus ); William Moore , Arthur Rowlands , Frances Morris and Mary McLaren . For additional information about Laurel and Hardy's career together, please See Entry for Pardon Us . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 Aug 1935.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jul 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
24 Aug 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 35
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Mar 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 35
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 35
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 35
pp. 2-3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 35
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jun 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 35
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
23 Jul 35
p. 4, 24
Motion Picture Herald
15 Jun 35
p. 71.
Motion Picture Herald
14 Sep 35
p. 35.
New York Times
24 Mar 1935.
---
Variety
28 Aug 35
p. 12.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Pres
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec eng
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Laurel and Hardy of India
McLaurel and McHardy
Kilts
Release Date:
23 August 1935
Production Date:
2 May--15 June 1935
retakes late July 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 August 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5753
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 82
Length(in feet):
7,361
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1055
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a Scottish village, a small group of people have gathered for the reading of wealthy Angus Ian McLaurel's will. While Angus' lawyer, Mr. Miggs, is reading the will, on the other side of town, Angus' American grandson, Stanley McLaurel, arrives with his friend Oliver Hardy. McLaurel's granddaughter Lorna is designated the main heir, with the stipulation that she go to India to stay with Colonel Gregor McGregor, a soldier who is to be the estate trustee and her guardian until she turns twenty-one. Lorna is distraught at having to leave her sweetheart, Alan Douglas, who is Miggs's assistant, but she is comforted by Lady Violet Ormsby, McGregor's sister. When Stan and Ollie arrive at the house, they discover that they broke out of jail and traveled to Scotland only to receive a snuffbox and bagpipes. The penniless pair leave, and after Ollie falls into a stream while trying to show Stan how to use snuff, they return to their inn. Later that night, Stan burns Ollie's pants as he is drying them, while Lady Ormsby and Lorna set off for India. Stan and Ollie are thrown out of the inn after three weeks of not paying the bill, and in their search for clothes, they inadvertantly join the army. Three months later, Alan, upon hearing that the boys will be transferred to India, joins the army and goes with them so that he can find Lorna. In India, Lorna has been misled by the fortune-hunting Lady Ormsby into thinking Alan no longer cares for her, and so she is being courted by McGregor. After their arrival, Stan and Ollie have a ... +


In a Scottish village, a small group of people have gathered for the reading of wealthy Angus Ian McLaurel's will. While Angus' lawyer, Mr. Miggs, is reading the will, on the other side of town, Angus' American grandson, Stanley McLaurel, arrives with his friend Oliver Hardy. McLaurel's granddaughter Lorna is designated the main heir, with the stipulation that she go to India to stay with Colonel Gregor McGregor, a soldier who is to be the estate trustee and her guardian until she turns twenty-one. Lorna is distraught at having to leave her sweetheart, Alan Douglas, who is Miggs's assistant, but she is comforted by Lady Violet Ormsby, McGregor's sister. When Stan and Ollie arrive at the house, they discover that they broke out of jail and traveled to Scotland only to receive a snuffbox and bagpipes. The penniless pair leave, and after Ollie falls into a stream while trying to show Stan how to use snuff, they return to their inn. Later that night, Stan burns Ollie's pants as he is drying them, while Lady Ormsby and Lorna set off for India. Stan and Ollie are thrown out of the inn after three weeks of not paying the bill, and in their search for clothes, they inadvertantly join the army. Three months later, Alan, upon hearing that the boys will be transferred to India, joins the army and goes with them so that he can find Lorna. In India, Lorna has been misled by the fortune-hunting Lady Ormsby into thinking Alan no longer cares for her, and so she is being courted by McGregor. After their arrival, Stan and Ollie have a trick played upon them by the veteran soldiers, while Alan overhears the announcement of Lorna's engagement to McGregor. After discovering that Alan is at the fort, Lorna meets him that night and is heartbroken when he castigates her for never writing to him. The next day, Millie, Lady Ormsby's dismissed maid, gives Lorna Alan's letters, which Lady Ormsby had intercepted. Lorna rushes off to find Alan, but he is on a dangerous mission to impersonate McGregor and his officers at a meeting with Khan Mir Jutra, a native rebel who intends to ambush the fort while the officers are absent. Stan and Ollie have also gone along under the impression that they are attending a luncheon. While Jutra entertains the impersonators, he learns that his rebels are attacking the fort, and, assuming victory, he attempts to make his captives commit suicide. He finds out, however, that the real McGregor was prepared for the attack and captured all the rebels. Stan and Ollie accidentally engineer their escape and run into bee hives in the courtyard. They throw the hives at the natives, who run away at the approach of McGregor's troops, who are in turn covered in bees themselves as Stan and Ollie run toward them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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