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HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A dying woman, endeavoring to take care of her attractive daughter, arranges for her to marry a family friend, an older widower with a young daughter. The wedding is performed at the sickbed and the mother dies almost immediately. As the film continues, the young wife becomes enamored of a handsome young friend of her husband's. Realizing the hopelessness of their love, the young man writes a note, which is seen by the husband. The shock kills him. The young widow now seeks the man she loves, only to learn she is too late, as he has gone off for parts unknown. The last scene is preceded by a title reading ‘The Only Thing Left to Live For’ and shows the young widow embracing her weeping stepdaughter.”
       The 29 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A graphic illustration of a delicate question. It is impossible for one person to help loving another. The reason no man knows, yet examples of misplaced love are so common that they have ceased to excite interest. In the instance illustrated the girl accepts what seems to her the only alternative, and yet fate was unkind to her, since the matter could have been made right had her lover remained near her for only a few hours longer. Possibly this film may seem unreal to some, yet it is unquestionably far too real, and far too true to real life to make it pleasant for many who will see it. One's thoughts almost unconsciously wander to similar cases one may have known, and the almost tragic fate of the ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “A dying woman, endeavoring to take care of her attractive daughter, arranges for her to marry a family friend, an older widower with a young daughter. The wedding is performed at the sickbed and the mother dies almost immediately. As the film continues, the young wife becomes enamored of a handsome young friend of her husband's. Realizing the hopelessness of their love, the young man writes a note, which is seen by the husband. The shock kills him. The young widow now seeks the man she loves, only to learn she is too late, as he has gone off for parts unknown. The last scene is preceded by a title reading ‘The Only Thing Left to Live For’ and shows the young widow embracing her weeping stepdaughter.”
       The 29 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “A graphic illustration of a delicate question. It is impossible for one person to help loving another. The reason no man knows, yet examples of misplaced love are so common that they have ceased to excite interest. In the instance illustrated the girl accepts what seems to her the only alternative, and yet fate was unkind to her, since the matter could have been made right had her lover remained near her for only a few hours longer. Possibly this film may seem unreal to some, yet it is unquestionably far too real, and far too true to real life to make it pleasant for many who will see it. One's thoughts almost unconsciously wander to similar cases one may have known, and the almost tragic fate of the unfortunate girl in this instance arouses sympathy. Technically almost perfect, the picture is almost irresistible in its appeal.”
       Interiors were filmed at the Biograph studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 160.
BPL
pp. 122-123.
EMP
p. 229.
LCMP
p. 42, column 3.
LCPP
p. 206.
Moving Picture World
22 Jan 1910
p. 100ta, 101ts, 109tl, 110tl.
Moving Picture World
29 Jan 1910
p. 128tr.
The Daily Worker
p. 71.
Variety
22 Jan 1910
tr.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 January 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
19 January 1910
Copyright Number:
J137450
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
988
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“Grace [Wallace] was the only child of a widow of decidedly meager means. Mr. Rupert Howland, a widower of considerable wealth, the father of a girl child, and an old friend of the family, often surreptitiously helped them. He dearly loved the young girl, but it was only at the death-bed of Mrs. Wallace that he really showed it. The poor woman at the point of death realized the helplessness of those she was leaving behind--her own aged parents and her daughter Grace. To assure their future she begged Grace to marry their dear friend, and Grace, touched by the man's goodness and her mother's condition, consented. Not content with the promise, she asked that the marriage take place at once by her bedside, and the wish was granted. Poor Grace struggled hard to love the dear old man, but while she admired and respected him, and was profoundly grateful for his kindness, she could not love him. It was not that she loved another, it was simply that their hearts were not affined. Her only happiness was to visit and ameliorate the burden of her grandparents, which she was able to do. Of course, Rupert's little one, Elsie, strongly appealed to her. However, resigned to her lot, she endeavored to make the best of it and hoped for a change in her nature. Here fate intervened, and one day Rupert introduces her to his friend, Mr. Wilson, a young and prosperous author. It was love at first sight, and the more they struggled the tighter they were caught in the net. Each fully appreciated their moral obligations and fought to down the tendencies of their inclination until at ... +


“Grace [Wallace] was the only child of a widow of decidedly meager means. Mr. Rupert Howland, a widower of considerable wealth, the father of a girl child, and an old friend of the family, often surreptitiously helped them. He dearly loved the young girl, but it was only at the death-bed of Mrs. Wallace that he really showed it. The poor woman at the point of death realized the helplessness of those she was leaving behind--her own aged parents and her daughter Grace. To assure their future she begged Grace to marry their dear friend, and Grace, touched by the man's goodness and her mother's condition, consented. Not content with the promise, she asked that the marriage take place at once by her bedside, and the wish was granted. Poor Grace struggled hard to love the dear old man, but while she admired and respected him, and was profoundly grateful for his kindness, she could not love him. It was not that she loved another, it was simply that their hearts were not affined. Her only happiness was to visit and ameliorate the burden of her grandparents, which she was able to do. Of course, Rupert's little one, Elsie, strongly appealed to her. However, resigned to her lot, she endeavored to make the best of it and hoped for a change in her nature. Here fate intervened, and one day Rupert introduces her to his friend, Mr. Wilson, a young and prosperous author. It was love at first sight, and the more they struggled the tighter they were caught in the net. Each fully appreciated their moral obligations and fought to down the tendencies of their inclination until at last an open declaration is made. At first it is delectable to Grace, but in a moment her better self asserts itself and she repulses his advances. Leaving her he goes home, writes her a note that he is going to where she will never see or hear of him again. Sending the note by a messenger, he leaves for parts unknown. This note falls into the hands of Rupert, and the shock proves too much for his weak heart, and he succumbs to the crushing blow. Rupert dead, Wilson gone forever, she feels she is indeed alone in the world. She sits sobbing in her room, when little Elsie, weeping bitterly over the loss of her father, enters. Grace's heart goes out to the child and feels that this is all there is to live for. She will devote her life to it.”—22 Jan 1910 Moving Picture World +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.