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HISTORY

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “The first scene takes place on a set of a living room of a modest house. A little girl attempts to attract her pre-occupied mother’s attention but is ignored, so her father takes her to the beach. He becomes interested in talking with an attractive female acquaintance, and the child, once more ignored, wanders off. She falls asleep on some rocks, where her life is endangered when the tide comes in. A stranger, a strong swimmer, saves her and takes her to her home. The film ends with her parents embracing in happiness over the child’s safe return.”
       The 27 Aug 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “What may result from neglect of children, so far as the physical end is concerned, is shown in this picture. The moral results of neglect cannot be depicted at such an early age, yet they are often more serious than the physical. This picture has little or no dramatic strength, but it depicts, with extraordinary fidelity to facts, numerous domestic scenes. Probably everyone can recall instances similar to this and not a few will wish that certain individuals of whom they are reminded could see it. It may, in a way, apply to substantially everyone, since all children sometimes seem to become troublesome and worry their parents. The picture, while not possessing any claims to dramatic power beyond that which is inherent in the subject will, nevertheless, make a profound impression, because it touches upon something which appeals directly to every home. It is one of the strongest sermons upon the neglect of children that has come out ... More Less

The U.S. Library of Congress catalog gives the following description: “The first scene takes place on a set of a living room of a modest house. A little girl attempts to attract her pre-occupied mother’s attention but is ignored, so her father takes her to the beach. He becomes interested in talking with an attractive female acquaintance, and the child, once more ignored, wanders off. She falls asleep on some rocks, where her life is endangered when the tide comes in. A stranger, a strong swimmer, saves her and takes her to her home. The film ends with her parents embracing in happiness over the child’s safe return.”
       The 27 Aug 1910 Moving Picture World ran the following review: “What may result from neglect of children, so far as the physical end is concerned, is shown in this picture. The moral results of neglect cannot be depicted at such an early age, yet they are often more serious than the physical. This picture has little or no dramatic strength, but it depicts, with extraordinary fidelity to facts, numerous domestic scenes. Probably everyone can recall instances similar to this and not a few will wish that certain individuals of whom they are reminded could see it. It may, in a way, apply to substantially everyone, since all children sometimes seem to become troublesome and worry their parents. The picture, while not possessing any claims to dramatic power beyond that which is inherent in the subject will, nevertheless, make a profound impression, because it touches upon something which appeals directly to every home. It is one of the strongest sermons upon the neglect of children that has come out in a long time.”
       Interiors were shot at Biograph’s studio at 11 East 14th Street in New York City. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 220.
BPL
pp. 128-129.
EMP
p. 285.
LCMP
p. 53, column 2.
LCPP
p. 214.
Moving Picture News
13 Aug 1910
p. 15tl.
Moving Picture World
13 Aug 1910
p. 363ts, 364tl.
Moving Picture World
27 Aug 1910
p. 463tr.
Nickelodeon
1 Aug 1910
p. 76-77.
The Daily Worker
p. 87.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 August 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
12 August 1910
Copyright Number:
J144207
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
980
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“God’s greatest gift to the home is the child, and how often is it scantily appreciated. In this Biograph story is shown the result of this lack of attention toward the child which almost reached a fatal culmination. Mrs. Randall is strongly addicted to the reading of cheap novels, so much so that she has little time for anything in the nature of domestic duties. The care of her ten-year-old girl child is especially odious. Living in their seashore cottage, the little one begs her mamma to take her to the beach, but mamma petulantly tells the child not to bother her. The father enters at this moment, and more to shame the mother than anything else, takes the child for a stroll on the beach. They have hardly departed when the minister calls, and Mrs. Randall sets about to do her utmost to entertain him. While on the beach, Mr. Randall meets a very fascinating and flirtatious young lady, and in a spirit of daring reciprocates her attention. The poor child is now left to its own devices to amuse itself. So, neglected, she wanders across the strand to a distant quiet bay. This portion of the resort is entirely deserted and the child mounts a rock far inland on which she sits to rest. The journey has fatigued her, and overcome by drowsiness she dozes off to sleep. Meanwhile, her carelessly indifferent parents are pursuing the bent of their own inclinations unmindful of what danger their child may be in. Some time has elapsed, and the tide turning, we find the rock on which the child sleeps completely surrounded by water with it still rising until it ... +


“God’s greatest gift to the home is the child, and how often is it scantily appreciated. In this Biograph story is shown the result of this lack of attention toward the child which almost reached a fatal culmination. Mrs. Randall is strongly addicted to the reading of cheap novels, so much so that she has little time for anything in the nature of domestic duties. The care of her ten-year-old girl child is especially odious. Living in their seashore cottage, the little one begs her mamma to take her to the beach, but mamma petulantly tells the child not to bother her. The father enters at this moment, and more to shame the mother than anything else, takes the child for a stroll on the beach. They have hardly departed when the minister calls, and Mrs. Randall sets about to do her utmost to entertain him. While on the beach, Mr. Randall meets a very fascinating and flirtatious young lady, and in a spirit of daring reciprocates her attention. The poor child is now left to its own devices to amuse itself. So, neglected, she wanders across the strand to a distant quiet bay. This portion of the resort is entirely deserted and the child mounts a rock far inland on which she sits to rest. The journey has fatigued her, and overcome by drowsiness she dozes off to sleep. Meanwhile, her carelessly indifferent parents are pursuing the bent of their own inclinations unmindful of what danger their child may be in. Some time has elapsed, and the tide turning, we find the rock on which the child sleeps completely surrounded by water with it still rising until it reaches her, waking her up. There she is marooned on the rock, with no help in sight. Her protracted absence arouses alarm and a search is started, but in vain, until a life-saver strolling this distant beach hears a feeble cry. Looking in the direction from whence it came he espies a small dark object far out from land. This proves to be the child’s head which now alone remains above the surface. He swims to her rescue, and carries her to her distracted parents, who have by this time been taught a bitter lesson as to what their careless indifference resulted in.”—13 Aug 1910 Moving Picture World +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.