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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BIOB2
p. 190.
BPL
pp. 126-127.
EMP
p. 348.
Film Index
30 Apr 1910
p. 12.
LCMP
p. 65, column 1.
LCPP
p. 105.
Moving Picture News
30 Apr 1910
p. 18tl.
Moving Picture World
30 Apr 1910
p. 698ta, 699ts, 703tl, 704tl.
MPW
14 May 10
p. 784tr.
The Daily Worker
pp. 78-79.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 April 1910
Copyright Claimant:
Biograph Co.
Copyright Date:
30 April 1910
Copyright Number:
J141018
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
981
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

“The colloquialism ‘up a tree’ is a metaphor for ‘in a difficulty; in a mess,’ etc. But the victims in this story were up a tree both metaphorically and actually, but there was one of them made so happy that this one event in a measure might condone the perpetrator for his mischief. Jake, young country lout, comes into the possession of a ladder, and plans to have some fun. Placing the ladder against a tall tree, he climbs up and lodges his cap in the branches. Descending, he waits at the foot, and when an old farmer appears, Jake begins to blubber, crying that his cap is in the tree where he tossed it after a bird and, pretending lameness, beseeches the farmer to get it. Up the farmer climbs and dislodges the cap, but when he attempts to descend, he finds that Jake has removed the ladder. He is ‘treed’ and no mistake. The trick worked so well that Jake is encouraged to try it again. This time his victims are a couple of lovers who have quarreled. The beau, in a huff, refuses when the sweetheart suggests he get the boy’s cap, so to shame him she climbs up herself. Fine! The lover follows, paying Jake to do the very he intended—remove the ladder. Of course, the girl is wild, but the lover is in his element. Here they are, ‘treed’ side by side on the limb. Jake seeks another victim further on. This time it is a man with a wagon. Same thing happens,only Jake drives off in the wagon to find another easy mark, which he does in the person of a Jew carrying ... +


“The colloquialism ‘up a tree’ is a metaphor for ‘in a difficulty; in a mess,’ etc. But the victims in this story were up a tree both metaphorically and actually, but there was one of them made so happy that this one event in a measure might condone the perpetrator for his mischief. Jake, young country lout, comes into the possession of a ladder, and plans to have some fun. Placing the ladder against a tall tree, he climbs up and lodges his cap in the branches. Descending, he waits at the foot, and when an old farmer appears, Jake begins to blubber, crying that his cap is in the tree where he tossed it after a bird and, pretending lameness, beseeches the farmer to get it. Up the farmer climbs and dislodges the cap, but when he attempts to descend, he finds that Jake has removed the ladder. He is ‘treed’ and no mistake. The trick worked so well that Jake is encouraged to try it again. This time his victims are a couple of lovers who have quarreled. The beau, in a huff, refuses when the sweetheart suggests he get the boy’s cap, so to shame him she climbs up herself. Fine! The lover follows, paying Jake to do the very he intended—remove the ladder. Of course, the girl is wild, but the lover is in his element. Here they are, ‘treed’ side by side on the limb. Jake seeks another victim further on. This time it is a man with a wagon. Same thing happens,only Jake drives off in the wagon to find another easy mark, which he does in the person of a Jew carrying two live chickens. Jake has visions of a chicken pie, but his dream fades, for the Jew carries the birds up the ladder. Further on, Jake sells the horse, wagon, and ladder to a painter for four dollars. Cheap, of course, but it is velvet to him. With the money, he goes to the summer garden restaurant and purchases four dollars’ worth of May wine. Meanwhile, the man with the wagon has retraced the route taken by Jake and comes upon the treed ones. All are anxious to be rescued except the young lover, who spurns their assistance until his sweetheart accepts him, which she finally does. The victims then band together to wreak vengeance, and fortune soon favors them, for along comes Jake, their persecutor, lame from head to foot. They pounce on him, and after administering chastisement, carry him up into one of the trees, where they leave him to think it over.”—30 Apr 1910 Film Index +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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Trees
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.