I Cover the Waterfront (1933)

70, 72 or 75 mins | Drama | 17 May 1933

Director:

James Cruze

Writer:

Wells Root

Producer:

Edward Small

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Editor:

Grant Whytock

Production Designer:

Albert D'Agostino

Production Company:

Reliance Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to Har , the book that was the basis of this film was Max Miller's autobiography, which covered his life as a reporter on the San Diego waterfront. Har commented that the original "sketchy" story was "not suitable for a picture" and did not have the love story that was at the center of the film. This was the last film of Ernest Torrence, who died before its release. The song "I Cover the Waterfront," written by John W. Green and Edward Heyman, while not in the film, was a big hit. A film based on the same source, entitled Secret of Deep Harbor , was made in 1961 by Harvard Film Corp. and released by United Artists Corp. (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ; ... More Less

According to Har , the book that was the basis of this film was Max Miller's autobiography, which covered his life as a reporter on the San Diego waterfront. Har commented that the original "sketchy" story was "not suitable for a picture" and did not have the love story that was at the center of the film. This was the last film of Ernest Torrence, who died before its release. The song "I Cover the Waterfront," written by John W. Green and Edward Heyman, while not in the film, was a big hit. A film based on the same source, entitled Secret of Deep Harbor , was made in 1961 by Harvard Film Corp. and released by United Artists Corp. (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70 ; F6.4321). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
19 May 33
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
20 May 33
p. 78.
HF
18 Feb 33
p. 12.
HF
4 Mar 33
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 33
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
18 May 33
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Apr 33
p. 26.
New York Times
18 May 33
p. 17.
Variety
23 May 33
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book I Cover the Waterfront by Max Miller (New York, 1932).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 May 1933
Production Date:
mid February--early March 1933
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corp.
Copyright Date:
9 June 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4000
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70, 72 or 75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Reporter H. Joseph Miller has spent five years covering the San Diego waterfront and intensely dislikes it. Hoping that he can get a job on a paper in the East and marry his Vermont sweetheart, Miller plans to break a story about the smuggling of Chinese into the country by fisherman Eli Kirk. When he is sent to investigate a girl swimming naked, Miller learns that the girl is Kirk's daughter Julie and decides to romance her to get the story. After Kirk drops a Chinese man overboard with chains around his ankles when Miller and the Coast Guard arrive to investigate, Kirk tells Julie that they will have to move on, maybe to Singapore, as soon as he gets enough money. Julie encourages Miller's flirting and, during the next two weeks, succeeds in making Miller see the beauty of the waterfront. As they fall in love, Julie inspires Miller to improve the novel he has been working on for five years. The night before Julie is to leave with her father, she sleeps over in Miller's room. At breakfast, after she announces that she is staying, Miller learns from her where Kirk is due to dock and notifies the Coast Guard. At the docks, after Miller rips open the belly of a large shark to reveal a Chinese man inside, Kirk is shot while escaping. Although Miller tells Julie that he really does love her, she sends him away. Miller locates Kirk, who shoots him in the arm. Julie arrives with a motorboat, but says she can't leave Miller to die. Although he is weak and dying, Kirk, seeing that Julie loves ... +


Reporter H. Joseph Miller has spent five years covering the San Diego waterfront and intensely dislikes it. Hoping that he can get a job on a paper in the East and marry his Vermont sweetheart, Miller plans to break a story about the smuggling of Chinese into the country by fisherman Eli Kirk. When he is sent to investigate a girl swimming naked, Miller learns that the girl is Kirk's daughter Julie and decides to romance her to get the story. After Kirk drops a Chinese man overboard with chains around his ankles when Miller and the Coast Guard arrive to investigate, Kirk tells Julie that they will have to move on, maybe to Singapore, as soon as he gets enough money. Julie encourages Miller's flirting and, during the next two weeks, succeeds in making Miller see the beauty of the waterfront. As they fall in love, Julie inspires Miller to improve the novel he has been working on for five years. The night before Julie is to leave with her father, she sleeps over in Miller's room. At breakfast, after she announces that she is staying, Miller learns from her where Kirk is due to dock and notifies the Coast Guard. At the docks, after Miller rips open the belly of a large shark to reveal a Chinese man inside, Kirk is shot while escaping. Although Miller tells Julie that he really does love her, she sends him away. Miller locates Kirk, who shoots him in the arm. Julie arrives with a motorboat, but says she can't leave Miller to die. Although he is weak and dying, Kirk, seeing that Julie loves Miller, takes him to shore, at the risk of getting caught, so that Miller can get a doctor. Kirk then dies. When Miller recovers, he finds that Julie has moved into his room. He tells her the ending of his novel, "he marries the girl," and embraces her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.